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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reviewing some of the video's on the ID.4 and it looks like one needs to remove a structural brace in order to remove/replace the 12v battery. Did anybody else notice this? Am I seeing things? It only looks like about 10 bolts, but it is something I would rather not have to do.
 

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I have been reviewing some of the video's on the ID.4 and it looks like one needs to remove a structural brace in order to remove/replace the 12v battery. Did anybody else notice this? Am I seeing things? It only looks like about 10 bolts, but it is something I would rather not have to do.
Can you post a screenprint or two of what you are seeing?

At least for some period, it's VW's problem if we need a 12V battery replacement. What is the warranty on the 12V battery? Most are 1 to 3 years bumper to bumper warrantees these days.

Looks like it's relatively out in the open to me, left (driver) side near firewall:

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Screen Shot 2020-10-26 at 2.52.00 PM.png
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The battery looks open and easy to get at, but not easy to remove with the brace in place. I saw this pic elsewhere on this forum, maybe I am missing something. Can't wait to see the car in person.
vw-id-4-honey-yellow-battery.jpg
 

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2021 ID.4 1st Edition (on order), 2012 CC Sport, 1986 Golf (former), 1967 Beetle (former)
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I think the battery is under a plastic cover and not under the brace. Seems simple enough to get and and swap.
 

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I think the battery is under a plastic cover and not under the brace. Seems simple enough to get and and swap.
That's what I thought too, but now I don't know. maybe it is in the back? Definitely looks like a round battery clamp for a battery terminal back there. Very odd if that is where it is. That must mean the box on the side is the fuse box?

@ixlr08 very interesting!

814
 

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My $.02 is that we’re overthinking here. Looks like there’s a latch on the left side of the 12v battery cover. I’d be willing to wager the cover lifts off and the 12v is then pretty easy to remove. Also, and it could just be the picture being distorted, but it looks like the 12v may be a smaller-than-normal battery. I seem to recall my i3 had a small 12v, too (it makes sense, as it’s not cranking a starter or anything).

EDIT: seems the black box on the right side of the pic may not be the 12v battery. Weird, it looks like a battery cover.
 

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@ixlr08 is correct about the battery hidden back there (the sway bar removal TBD), sharp eyes! I searched on ID.3 battery, and check this out! Battery location at 3:21. (Also, this shows how important it is to carry a Li pack in an EV.). The plastic cover is most likely the fuse box cover, the box doubling as terminal connections.

Volkswagen ID.3 Joins The Club Of EVs With 12V Battery Issues
 

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Not the ideal packaging choice, but then I have to take apart a number of things to get at my TTS battery in the trunk-well too. There's only so much space and designers have to make compromises based on reliability & maintainability factors and replacing the battery is relatively infrequent (five years this month on my TTS battery with no issues). Loosening the strut brace is not a huge deal but again not ideal. I carry a Li-ion boost pack and will continue to do so with the ID.4

I'm more interested in the availability-longevity and maintainability-ease of replacement of the main propulsion battery. ;)

For those R&M types:
Availability = MTBF / (MTBF + MTTR)
[mean time before failure (MTBF) and mean time to repair (MTTR)]
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@ixlr08 is correct about the battery hidden back there (the sway bar removal TBD), sharp eyes!

Volkswagen ID.3 Joins The Club Of EVs With 12V Battery Issues
I don't think it is a sway bar that needs to be removed. It looks to me to be a structural brace. I definitely want to learn more about how the 12v battery is kept charged.
 

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The question on charging is a good one. Reports from other EV makes are that some 12v batteries are having early mortality due to the charging scheme. Apparently, a "normal" lead-acid battery can develop sulfate coating on the plates with certain kinds of charging strategies. Some are arguing that the mini-12v battery should be something other than lead-acid (save some weight, too).
 

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I don't think it is a sway bar that needs to be removed. It looks to me to be a structural brace. I definitely want to learn more about how the 12v battery is kept charged.
If it’s like other EV’s, there’s an inverter that charges the 12v while the car is powered on. The 12v basically just needs enough “juice” to power on the electronics and the HV takes over from there.
 

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If it’s like other EV’s, there’s an inverter that charges the 12v while the car is powered on. The 12v basically just needs enough “juice” to power on the electronics and the HV takes over from there.
Yes DC to DC converter. The variability is WHEN the 12v battery is charged. As you say, some charge when the car is powered on. Better is if it happens anytime the 12v battery needs a charge. This is good for when the car is left alone for some longer period of time. I have two neighbors with Model 3's who just got back from 6 months away. Both cars were not plugged in during time and both still had 20% range on return, plus 12v batteries were OK. If I left my former Porsche 911 for 6 months without a battery maintainer, it would be toast on return. I think there is a variability on how manufacturers are implementing 12v charging and it's very difficult to determine just what it is from publicly-available info.
 
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