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I'm not an electrician, but this usage makes me feel nervous. Would the included charger really hold up under this load over time? What happens if the plug is wired for more than 20 amps?
 

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I'm not an electrician, but this usage makes me feel nervous. Would the included charger really hold up under this load over time? What happens if the plug is wired for more than 20 amps?
You may want to refer to this thread. Full discussion there. @DanM did the main evaluation. The charger won't pull more than 10 amps regardless of your outlet circuit.

Here's where test result was first posted: US ID.4 included EVSE charger
 

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Any device that you plug into an outlet won't draw more current than it is capable of drawing unless it is broken. For example, if you plug a TV that needs 1 amp to run into a 120 volt socket, it is going to draw 1 amp even though that receptacle can deliver 15 amps. EVSEs are designed to have a maximum current draw -- for example, the Grizzl-e charger has internal dip switches that you set to adjust the current draw to either 16, 24, 32 or 40 amps. Once those switches are set, it won't draw more than that setting even if the outlet you plug into provides greater amperage.
 

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What happens if the plug is wired for more than 20 amps?
A cynical electrician might say that the fire would be between the receptacle and the car, not inside the wall.

The plug pictured is an NEMA 6-15P. (15 Amps) It will fit into a NEMA 6-15R or 6-20R receptacle.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition White / Lunar Grey
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I'm not an electrician, but this usage makes me feel nervous. Would the included charger really hold up under this load over time? What happens if the plug is wired for more than 20 amps?
Remember that our EVSEs are not chargers, and don't do anything with the incoming electricity other than pass it through to the car (and monitor it) .

The wire and contactor on the neutral side is exactly the same gauge and capacity as on the hot side of a 120 volt unit. So if it's designed for dual voltage, the neutral side is every bit capable of handling the 2nd 120 volt line.

This is a setup I use regularly, and frankly am more comfortable with the quality of electronics VW provides vs. my rather generic unit.
 

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BTW that adapter pictured in the first post, when the blades are both oriented in line like that, is a 15 amp configuration.

Beyond that, my problem with block adapters like that one is they extend out the plug, and may not fit properly inside a weatherproof enclosure. Plus the extra leverage of the adapter + plug + cord can pull these loose, particularly if the ground pin is oriented on the bottom.

For my 120 to 220 adapter, I assembled my own pigtail from these two pieces:

This has three benefits, but also a downside.
+ 90° plug allows use inside of most weatherproof enclosures
+ 90° plug hangs naturally and is resistant to being pulled out of receptacle
+ weatherproof receptacle end (bonded to cord)
(-) only fits one orientation (ground pin up or ground pin down); need to build and cary two of these if you anticipate using this in unexpected places

4071
 
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