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ID.4 Pro S Gradient AWD pre-ordered 9/23/2020
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I've been saying this all along about the rear drums. My i3's brakes (particularly the rear) were constantly corroded and made noise because of it.
 

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I've been saying this all along about the rear drums. My i3's brakes (particularly the rear) were constantly corroded and made noise because of it.
But people in US want drilled aftermarket discs and painted pad cylinders....it is all about standing out...not so much that a lot of people will face driving in salty conditions completely unusable and need premature replacement because of that.
It is much better from engineering standpoint but there is a lot of people who test it for Car magazines complaining about something they have no clue why it was choosen in first place...
Same thing applies to unnecessary big rims with very skinny tire sidewall..... that kill efficiency and it is great opportunity for dealers to sell you road hazard insurance or new tire and rim when you hit pothole driving on Interstate.
 

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I'm happy for the drums. My wife's Ioniq EV rear brakes get super rusty due to non-use. I have to "bed" them in occasionally when I drive it with the regen off just so they stop making a grinding sound. Drums are the way to go on non-performance EVs.
 

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I'm also happy that it has rear drums. When I started my research into BEV I read that maintenance costs would be less than an ICE vehicle. One of the potential savings was the brakes. So I am thinking that with regen braking the rear brakes will get less use & that will not be good for the rear disks. Here in Canada rear disk brakes do not do well & require a lot of maintenance. I have a 2006 Toyota Tundra with rear drum brakes. I am the original owner & besides the occasional inspection & lube they are still OK They have around 50% of the brake shoes left. When the truck was new there was a Ford or Chevy ad saying what is wrong with Toyota using drum brakes We are better we have disks on the 4 corners. But in real-world tests, the tundra stopped in a shorter distance. So overall system design is as important as just having disks on the 4 corners
 

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ID.4 1st Edition
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Let's be reminded that the ID.4 rear drum brakes aren't your grandfather's drums design (or father's in my case). ;) Far better pad material technology as well.

And given how relatively little they're employed I respect the designer's decision to innately drum-encapsulate them against the elements. We wouldn't profit much from disc's on the rear and more maintenance as well.

In the VAG world disc brakes are auto-applied periodically to keep the disc's themselves clear of flash rust and to dry them so another potential range-reduction element, even if minor.
 

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And given how relatively little they're employed I respect the designer's decision to innately drum-encapsulate them against the elements. We wouldn't profit much from disc's on the rear and more maintenance as well.
I've learned over the years that design decisions that don't seem prudent to me at first glance usually have good reasons behind them.
 

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That's the engineer in us. ;)

Of course I, as most designers, understood but still didn't like beancounter reductions ("value engineering").
However again the drum brakes in this case wasn't cost cutting, but a rather inspired course of design.
I've learned over the years that design decisions that don't seem prudent to me at first glance usually have good reasons behind them.
 

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2021 Moonstone Grey ID.4
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But people in US want drilled aftermarket discs and painted pad cylinders....it is all about standing out...not so much that a lot of people will face driving in salty conditions completely unusable and need premature replacement because of that.
It is much better from engineering standpoint but there is a lot of people who test it for Car magazines complaining about something they have no clue why it was choosen in first place...
Same thing applies to unnecessary big rims with very skinny tire sidewall..... that kill efficiency and it is great opportunity for dealers to sell you road hazard insurance or new tire and rim when you hit pothole driving on Interstate.
I, personally, can't disagree with this enough. My cars are always stock, as are the cars of most people I know. Sure, there is a (small & vocal) group of people who want the bling, but I think the vast majority of people in the US that just want their cars to work, who don't put any money into their cars other than maintenance & repair items.
 

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I agree. The folks on automotive forums are commonly enthusiasts and therefore far more likely to modify a vehicle than the average person out there. In the various neighborhoods where I've lived over the years I've always been the only one who worked on my own vehicle and/or modded it. Well, exception the few years I lived in SoCal of course. ;)

But then if you compare Brit's with Americans on average we're far more apt to modify, and that's taking into account their "men in sheds." So, as always perspective.

In fairness to VW TECHNICIAN however I've been guilty of installing [unnecessary] drilled/slotted rotors and intakes myself. 🤦‍♂️ But in my case it was more that I enjoyed the installation process. 🔧
I, personally, can't disagree with this enough. My cars are always stock, as are the cars of most people I know. Sure, there is a (small & vocal) group of people who want the bling, but I think the vast majority of people in the US that just want their cars to work, who don't put any money into their cars other than maintenance & repair items.
 

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Let's be reminded that the ID.4 rear drum brakes aren't your grandfather's drums design (or father's in my case). ;) Far better pad material technology as well.

And given how relatively little they're employed I respect the designer's decision to innately drum-encapsulate them against the elements. We wouldn't profit much from disc's on the rear and more maintenance as well.

In the VAG world disc brakes are auto-applied periodically to keep the disc's themselves clear of flash rust and to dry them so another potential range-reduction element, even if minor.
This feature is on Audi but not much on VW models....unless they make it happen with EV offers.
 

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I agree. The folks on automotive forums are commonly enthusiasts and therefore far more likely to modify a vehicle than the average person out there. In the various neighborhoods where I've lived over the years I've always been the only one who worked on my own vehicle and/or modded it. Well, exception the few years I lived in SoCal of course. ;)

But then if you compare Brit's with Americans on average we're far more apt to modify, and that's taking into account their "men in sheds." So, as always perspective.

In fairness to VW TECHNICIAN however I've been guilty of installing [unnecessary] drilled/slotted rotors and intakes myself. 🤦‍♂️ But in my case it was more that I enjoyed the installation process. 🔧
I'm not Judging anyone....just trying to explain why drum brakes are there as final.
Making a Car look the way you want is what some people like and don't mind spending money.... but it is really worth only person who is doing it would answer this.
Many aftermarket offerings especially for ICE cars are fake and misleading...example open style air filter....that actually suck hot air under the hood while driving and killing your engine power. But when they test on dyno it is always with hood open.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition
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Yes, I was more trying to make the point that disc brake rotors can get flash rust & wet and therefore again the rear drum setup is far better in that regard.

I've also seen folks place conical 'performance' air filters within an ICE engine bay without any regard for actually pulling in cold air.
And also too-wide tires that cause "railroading" and thereby kill maneuverability.
🤷‍♂️
After-marketing in the USA especially is quite enticing and many buy before due diligence research into their own application, or common sense for that matter.
This feature is on Audi but not much on VW models....unless they make it happen with EV offers.
 

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For anyone who wants to learn what it takes to get ICE engine efficient watch Gale Banks YouTube videos and what it takes to design good part for selling in aftermarket world. Companies like him are things that you want to buy. I have personally meet him while living in CA now and working here.
 

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Eventually some day there will offering for EV aftermarket world. But it weed out all fake and cheap wanna be suppliers. For designing and making more rpm capable electric motor rotor and controllers will take great experience and knowledge in various metal methods and controllers design...to make your EV more powerful.
 

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This feature is on Audi but not much on VW models....unless they make it happen with EV offers.
Actually this is not true. My e-Golf had this option. Many other regular Golfs had this function as well. It is triggered to dry the discs when it is raining. Using a VCDS tool, I actually turned off this function to save some range. But I don’t think if I ever got significant range improvement.


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2021 VW ID.4 1st Edition, Dusk Blue <3
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Actually this is not true. My e-Golf had this option. Many other regular Golfs had this function as well. It is triggered to dry the discs when it is raining. Using a VCDS tool, I actually turned off this function to save some range. But I don’t think if I ever got significant range improvement.


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Yeah, my 2017 Golf Alltrack SE had this feature as well. Maybe it's pretty much only been a Golf thing, though?
 

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Actually this is not true. My e-Golf had this option. Many other regular Golfs had this function as well. It is triggered to dry the discs when it is raining. Using a VCDS tool, I actually turned off this function to save some range. But I don’t think if I ever got significant range improvement.


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How you actually read my comment before correcting my statement. This forum consists people in other markets beside US ....so what you get to know in EU or US are not likely to be the same across the VW portfolio .
 

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How you actually read my comment before correcting my statement. This forum consists people in other markets beside US ....so what you get to know in EU or US are not likely to be the same across the VW portfolio .
Dude, chill. You did say VW doesn’t have that feature but Audi, and didn’t reference any specific region. I just gave an example that this is not true. It doesn’t matter which region.


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