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I concur with all you say.
My observation is that the heater is using far more energy today than the AC in the hottest of summer days.
This is certainly true of heat pumps for houses. Our mitsubishi mini-splits use almost no energy in summer to cool the house, but they suck power like it's going out of style during winter. It costs us about $20 per month to cool during hot weather, and close to $400 month to heat in the coldest winter months. With solar panels however we typically start winter with a large credit with our power company and don't pay anything until around February.
 

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Have you also had this issue where you aren't displaying the usual range?
Oh yes.
Charged today, start 54 miles and 15%. Max charge rate 95 kW. End 206 miles and 80%. 47 kWh delivered in 37:22 min.
Charged last Aug, start 62 miles and 14%. Max charge rate 123 kW. End 245 miles and 80%. 54 kWh delivered in 33:47 min.
 

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This is certainly true of heat pumps for houses. Our mitsubishi mini-splits use almost no energy in summer to cool the house, but they suck power like it's going out of style during winter. It costs us about $20 per month to cool during hot weather, and close to $400 month to heat in the coldest winter months. With solar panels however we typically start winter with a large credit with our power company and don't pay anything until around February.
In the summertime, you are dropping the temp in the car from 95 F to 75 F, 20 degree delta. In the wintertime, you are raising the temp from 35 F to 75 F, 40 degree delta.
A heat pump is almost always better than resistance heating.
BEVs, to me, are not good cold weather transportation 😬.
 

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BEVs, to me, are not good cold weather transportation 😬.
I still charge 90% of the time at home, so charging speeds really only are interesting to me on road trips. I am kind of wondering what's going on with slower charge rates that people are starting to report at EA stations.

Running the heat is an interesting question - in the Kona, I would sometimes have to make longer trips with minimal heat, but my recollection is that while the heat would run full blast for a few minutes, eventually the cabin temperature stabilized, the electric draw from the heater dropped to a far more reasonable level. Preconditioning can reduce this initial draw considerably.

The hardest challenge for a BEV would be longer road trips in the winter, where need DCFC, where you may wish to run the heat, and DC and when charging speeds are reduced when the batteries are cold. Shorter trips can still be easily done with L2 and with the heat set to a comfortable level.
 

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BEVs, to me, are not good cold weather transportation 😬.
I'm going into my 4th New England winter using a BEV (2018 VW e-Golf) with winter tires, and to me it has been not just good but great cold weather transportation. The trim I have uses a heat pump, which makes a difference, I think, but the big advantage for me is the ability to pre-heat the cabin and defrost the windows before heading out to the car. Doing so actually makes a pretty big positive impact on range because the car only needs to maintain the cabin temperature. The extra weight of the car from the batteries together with the winter tires helps to keep the car very well grounded, even on ice and snow. (Still don't understand why VW didn't at least make the heat pump an option for the ID.4s in the U.S. trims.) And even with the reduced range that cold weather brings, my e-Golf still has plenty of range for what I need it to do.

I do agree that BEVs have challenges in colder weather simply because they use energy very efficiently and so there's very little waste heat to use in heating the cabin. Thus, they have to use energy from the battery to create heat (and the battery is already not at its best in colder weather). In this regard, ICE vehicles have an advantage because they waste around 60-70% of the fuel they burn on generating heat rather than moving the vehicle, and some of this waste heat can be easily repurposed to heat the cabin in winter. Personally, I don't see these challenges as insurmountable for BEVs (Norway seems to be coping pretty well), but I guess it depends in the end on what you need to use the vehicle for. There are definitely many use cases (towing long distances, e.g.) where a BEV is just not there yet for winter (or any other) use.
 

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One way to cope with the effects of winter weather is to wear a coat! So many people I know get into their ICE cars wearing nothing but a light jacket (if that even). Expecting the vehicle to keep the interior temp. at 75°F is half the problem. I pre-heat my ID.4 and drive with the interior temp set at 60° because I wear appropriate clothing, and I expect it to be cool in the car. The heater pulls way less energy trying to hold temp, and I'm perfectly comfortable driving. And it's not uncomfortable wearing a fleece top and a hat. Especially if you heat the seats and wheel. Dressing appropriately is one of the ways that people living in Norway/Sweden/Canada/etc. manage their EV's and so much more. A pair of fleece lined pants is good for an extra 50 miles of range!
 

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Thats kind of what I did with my Kona. But sometimes the windows would fog up, and I would need to boost the heat to keep the windows clear.
 

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Thats kind of what I did with my Kona. But sometimes the windows would fog up, and I would need to boost the heat to keep the windows clear.
My 1976 Plymouth Volare had a leaking heater core. So I just bypassed it. I only had a 5 mile commute. Sometimes the driver door wouldn't latch closed 😳 and I'd have to scrape the frost off the inside of the windshield. Steering with the left hand and holding the door closed with the right hand.
Those were the days 🤣😂🤣.
 

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My 1976 Plymouth Volare had a leaking heater core. So I just bypassed it. I only had a 5 mile commute. Sometimes the driver door wouldn't latch closed 😳 and I'd have to scrape the frost off the inside of the windshield. Steering with the left hand and holding the door closed with the right hand.
Those were the days 🤣😂🤣.
When I was in high school, I had a friend with an old beater of a car where the wiper mother had burned out. He had a cord that he ran in through the wing window (how many of the young uns even know what that is) that he would pull to get the wiper blades to wipe the windshield. The things we used to do...
 

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When I was in high school, I had a friend with an old beater of a car where the wiper mother had burned out. He had a cord that he ran in through the wing window (how many of the young uns even know what that is) that he would pull to get the wiper blades to wipe the windshield. The things we used to do...
That's truly hysterical. But only because that's something I would have done too.
 

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I’ve had my id4 since May. Going on 6 months now. Charging from 30 or 40% to 80% to 90% at home every night. At 90% I would start the day with about 235-240 miles. Now it only charges to 200 miles at 90%.

I get that the battery might loose power over time but only after 6 months? Where am I gonna be in another 6?

Anyone else encounter this yet? I wonder if this might fall under the battery warranty.
As it gets colder the battery isn't as efficient.

Putting on snow tires? That eats up power.

Not having the car in a tempered garage means less battery efficiency if temps drop at night.

Heating the car uses a lot of energy.

I've gone from 4+ miles/kwh to less than 3 in winter (not in an ID.4). Even when it gets down into the 30s* at night. When it really gets snowy and cold I figure 1/3 drop in range with snows on.

How to keep your range up? Don't set the heater temp above 70* and put it on recirculate. And don't blast the air. Keep the fan at lower speeds to get warmer air earlier. Use your seat heater at a low setting. Once it warms up a bit put the air on the windshield and upper body. If the windshield starts fogging go only with windshield. If you have trouble keeping it clear crack a rear window just a smidge for outside air. It will lower the humidity enough. But don't be taking outside air through the heater. But at all costs keep the windshield clear even if you have to blast it in really cold weather. And keep your tire pressure up as it gets colder.

Set your charging for TOD and your battery will be warmer from the charging. Also 'condition' your car before you leave and AFTER it's finished charging. This will use power from the cord, not your battery to warm up the car - and battery if it's cold enough.

Good luck

Your range will go up if you're militant about this. But it may take a longer trip or several chargings for the range 'brain' to calculate a longer range based on your past behavior.
 

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This past Ides of March when I took delivery we still had a month of cold, but not frigid, weather. I used the seat and steering wheel heaters more than cabin heater (all of course radiant electric in nature in USA). The seat/wheel heating was more than adequate, especially as I didn't realize for some time that dealer prep hadn't opened my vents. 🤦‍♂️

I'm still waiting for very cold weather to form a final opinion but I expect with proper Winter attire, and thereby lower cabin temp setpoint, all will be well in my typical driving.
One way to cope with the effects of winter weather is to wear a coat! So many people I know get into their ICE cars wearing nothing but a light jacket (if that even). Expecting the vehicle to keep the interior temp. at 75°F is half the problem. I pre-heat my ID.4 and drive with the interior temp set at 60° because I wear appropriate clothing, and I expect it to be cool in the car. The heater pulls way less energy trying to hold temp, and I'm perfectly comfortable driving. And it's not uncomfortable wearing a fleece top and a hat. Especially if you heat the seats and wheel. Dressing appropriately is one of the ways that people living in Norway/Sweden/Canada/etc. manage their EV's and so much more. A pair of fleece lined pants is good for an extra 50 miles of range!
 

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I'm still waiting for very cold weather to form a final opinion but I expect with proper Winter attire, and thereby lower cabin temp setpoint, all will be well in my typical driving.
Thats where I am. I use L2 90% of the time, and we have an attached garage that stays a good bit warmer than the outdoors.

We had the shade open yesterday, so the sun warmed us up a good bit. We got that little bonus too. With heater set to 62 degrees, I haven't noticed much drop in range at all, in fact.

It is really only the occasional road trip where DCFC becomes important.

When I had the Kona, I learned how awful winter charging could be if you naively did a DC charge 1st thing in the morning after having been parked outdoors overnight.
 

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Most folks don't like wearing hats, since Pres. Kennedy ditched his, but it makes a very significant positive difference in keeping warm in cold climates. "Don't leave home without it." -AMEX ;) Proper footwear almost as much.

My pano-roof shade is now open for the duration of cold wx operation. 🌞⛄
Thats where I am. I use L2 90% of the time, and we have an attached garage that stays a good bit warmer than the outdoors.

We had the shade open yesterday, so the sun warmed us up a good bit. We got that little bonus too. With heater set to 62 degrees, I haven't noticed much drop in range at all, in fact.

It is really only the occasional road trip where DCFC becomes important.

When I had the Kona, I learned how awful winter charging could be if you naively did a DC charge 1st thing in the morning after having been parked outdoors overnight.
 

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Most folks don't like wearing hats, since Pres. Kennedy ditched his, but it makes a very significant positive difference in keeping warm in cold climates. "Don't leave home without it." -AMEX ;) Proper footwear almost as much.

My pano-roof shade is now open for the duration of cold wx operation. 🌞⛄
With the shade retracted, sometimes you need a hat to keep the sun from overwhelming your vision.
 

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I threw a stocking cap and gloves in the car yesterday. It remains to be seen how well the controls work with gloves on - I wasn't able to test that in March.

There exist special gloves that work with smartphone screens - thats now a thing, and it may be needed. Something about the fingertips is different.
 

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Plan ahead and don't hesitate to use heater to stay in comfort... i drive with t shirt in the winter no matter how cold is outside temperature.
With one person in the car Climatronic is quite smart to keep driver happy and use minimal power to run heater.
If you living ID4 for long time and battery heater needs to kick in to warm battery....consider this as additional energy lost...
Adjust to the car and how it behave in the winter and there will be no need for trying to keep yourself self from freezing cabin environment.
 

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Adjust to the car and how it behave in the winter and there will be no need for trying to keep yourself self from freezing cabin environment.
And thats fine, but I always keep hat, gloves and blanket in the car in the winter, just as a precaution against something weird happening. Even if I never need to use it, I always keep it in the car.
 

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And thats fine, but I always keep hat, gloves and blanket in the car in the winter, just as a precaution against something weird happening. Even if I never need to use it, I always keep it in the car.
I'm no different....I do in the winter with EV a lot of things regular people will never try and keep Honda generator just if there is no way getting juice any other way.
And blankets are always part of my safety gear
 

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Hi everyone, I witnessed the range change yesterday when I drove on I-75 north to Ocala Florida. When I charged on way back to 90%, I was showing only around 200 miles. I thought it was the charger, but now it makes sense. I was driving at higher speeds and the range I was getting was typically less on freeway driving. I assume it will reset daily as your driving style changes.
One thing many people aren't aware of is that wind resistance doesn't double if you go twice as fast - it quadruples. Resistance is a squared function. My EV gets good mileage at 60 mph. At 70 it falls off quite a bit. If everyone else is doing 75 I will do 65 if there are good sight lines. If it's very crowded I'll go the speed everyone else goes in the outside lane or two. I want to minimize the speed differential as much as possible as many people don't think ahead much - or at all - and are unpredictable.

Even on a conventional piston engine the stresses at 3 times the rpm are 9 times greater. That's why piston engine cars have to have multiple geared transmissions. Electrical motors are subject to the same laws but have a lot less stress to begin with and the range of motion is confined to a small radius, resulting in smaller forces. Just think of a piston at rpms not only ismoving very fast at the end of a rod but TOTALLY REVERSES DIRECTION many times a second with high heat.

Just wanted to throw that out there as those principles are still at work on an EV but at a much lower level, resulting in extreme efficiency compared to a conventional engine. But speed on the highway acts the same on all cars, EV or not.
 
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