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Should i need to avoid DC fast charging for better battery life. I live 1 minute drive(0.5 mile) from EA DC Fast charging location. I prefer DC fast charging than home charging ! should i need to avoid it and go with level 2 ?
 

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Some researchers at the Institute of Mechanical Engineers report from a UC Riverside study that permanent changes occur in the battery after just 25 DC fast charges. I only read that after buying the car! So I am going to use a home Level 2 charger most of the time. Then again, the warranty gives you a new battery if the original falls below 70% during the warranty period, so that gives you some protection. Fast-charging can damage electric car batteries in just 25 cycles (imeche.org)
 

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I’m reading this as I sit charging at an EA station Lol. That said, my level 2 charger should be installed late June/early July.
 

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Happy owner of a blue ID.4 FE
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Some researchers at the Institute of Mechanical Engineers report from a UC Riverside study that permanent changes occur in the battery after just 25 DC fast charges. I only read that after buying the car! So I am going to use a home Level 2 charger most of the time. Then again, the warranty gives you a new battery if the original falls below 70% during the warranty period, so that gives you some protection. Fast-charging can damage electric car batteries in just 25 cycles (imeche.org)
The UV Riverside folks tested this under highly artificial circumstances, not on actual cars and not on actual DC fast chargers. Especially no battery management system. In essence, they were trying out a new charging algorithm that does what an advanced battery management system might already do, or might do in the future. I would not worry about this paper any more than reports about breakthroughs for battery technology.
On the other hand, we have real cars that have fast-charged all their lives for a quarter-million miles, e.g. the Tesla limos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The UV Riverside folks tested this under highly artificial circumstances, not on actual cars and not on actual DC fast chargers. Especially no battery management system. In essence, they were trying out a new charging algorithm that does what an advanced battery management system might already do, or might do in the future. I would not worry about this paper any more than reports about breakthroughs for battery technology.
On the other hand, we have real cars that have fast-charged all their lives for a quarter-million miles, e.g. the Tesla limos.
Thank you.. Good to know that !
 

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I just restrict my EA charging to 80%. On a side note while I was at EA charging tonight a Porsche Taycan pulled into the adjacent charger. Didn’t talk to the kid as a torrential downpour was going on. Also I only had 4 minutes left charging and he took his umbrella in search of a restroom I think.
 

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It is a good idea to use DCFC for situations where it is needed, not just taking advantage of free charging. The Chevy Bolt seemed to not degrade at all from fast charging, but that was >50 KW charging. I would not think one would be doing extreme damage, but definitely putting an additional strain on the battery.
 

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Tesla tells its owners the same about SC. I know several that disregard this and use SC a lot. They tell me they notice no difference in battery wear.
 

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I guess only time will tell. There are several Bolt owners now with over 200k miles, with not much over 10 percent degradation. I think it all comes down to the charging profile and the thermal management. I will use DCFC on mine on trips and times when needed, however I don't have any options near me either. I think it really boils down to how much you care about degradation. I will do the same as I did with the Bolt, charging to 80 percent daily, and limit fast charging, as I plan to keep the car a long time.
 

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Is EA L3 only? Or can I L2 at an EA charging station?
It depends on the installation. The EA near my home offers both Level 3 and 2 charging. However, there are many L2 chargers around town and the cost range from free to 16 cents per KWH so not too bad. About what it costs charging at home.
 

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We have 2 EA sites convenient to us with shopping and restaurants nearby so we do most of our charging there. We always charge to 80% except for one time on a road trip we went to 90%. We have over 6500 miles on this car in less than 3 months without any noticeable degradation so we will rely on the warranty if needed.
 

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VW gave us three years of EA fast charging and tells us the ID4 has 250 to 260 miles range. No way to get that kind of range without charging to at least 90-95%. Time will tell.
 

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We have 2 EA sites convenient to us with shopping and restaurants nearby so we do most of our charging there. We always charge to 80% except for one time on a road trip we went to 90%. We have over 6500 miles on this car in less than 3 months without any noticeable degradation so we will rely on the warranty if needed.
High charge rates will degrade the battery capacity more quickly than lower rates (e.g., 1c vs L2) for the same final SOC.

What is the ID.4 battery capacity warranty; is there one?
 

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VW gave us three years of EA fast charging and tells us the ID4 has 250 to 260 miles range. No way to get that kind of range without charging to at least 90-95%. Time will tell.
Indeed. I predict you will be able to measure your range loss if you do 200+ DCFC charge cycles (50K+ miles).
 

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Some researchers at the Institute of Mechanical Engineers report from a UC Riverside study that permanent changes occur in the battery after just 25 DC fast charges. I only read that after buying the car! So I am going to use a home Level 2 charger most of the time. Then again, the warranty gives you a new battery if the original falls below 70% during the warranty period, so that gives you some protection. Fast-charging can damage electric car batteries in just 25 cycles (imeche.org)
By definition what is considered a DC fast charger? Is there a kwh limit to be considered a DC fast charger?
 

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By definition what is considered a DC fast charger? Is there a kwh limit to be considered a DC fast charger?
I'm not sure about any definition, but I would consider any charge that is supplying DC (L3) vs AC (L1, L2) to the car. Those are typically much faster than the AC charging locations (I am not sure, but I have not heard of any DC charging locations that supply less than 50 kW, nor any AC charging locations that supply more than 12 kW).
 

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VW’s upcoming V2G chargers are DC at 22kW. Those are the lowest DC chargers I’ve read about, and by virtue of being twice as fast as the ID4 AC port would qualify as fast in my book.
 

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VW’s upcoming V2G chargers are DC at 22kW. Those are the lowest DC chargers I’ve read about, and by virtue of being twice as fast as the ID4 AC port would qualify as fast in my book.
That would be awesome to have, but I am sure it would require some serious electrical work to get those installed at your house. Does it specify how much voltage or amps, and is it even something considered for the general public or just something for utility companies to install around town?
 
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