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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, it is early but some incentives and decided the best way to have a super mild winter is to spend way too much money on tyres.

I don’t really have to have them, but around here is it often right near freezing so very slick ice around. I think worth having them, just in case.
I bought wheels/tyres all mounted and balanced with lugs etc. I can swap in my garage pretty easily.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Locking hubs Tread

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Automotive lighting
 

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Any specific reason you went with those wheels? I'm going to use the 18" Enkei XM-6's or PX-10's because of weight and the design is open enough so that if wet snow or ice gets stuck in the wheel(causing it to go out of balance) I can more easily remove it.
 

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Any specific reason you went with those wheels? I'm going to use the 18" Enkei XM-6's or PX-10's because of weight and the design is open enough so that if wet snow or ice gets stuck in the wheel(causing it to go out of balance) I can more easily remove it.
This is why I advise metal wheels for winter, wheels will mange better snow from sticking on the wheels and most important aspect it will keep heat inside much better than aluminum. Heat is important for winter tires if you are after maximum grip. And they are way more rigid for road potholes that show up from nowhere on the roads.
 

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Well, it is early but some incentives and decided the best way to have a super mild winter is to spend way too much money on tyres.

I don’t really have to have them, but around here is it often right near freezing so very slick ice around. I think worth having them, just in case.
I bought wheels/tyres all mounted and balanced with lugs etc. I can swap in my garage pretty easily.

View attachment 15260
View attachment 15261
We have these at about $ 80 more expensive in CAD ($1200CAD) but they give you $120 off when you purchase 4. So about same price.
 

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This is why I advise metal wheels for winter, wheels will mange better snow from sticking on the wheels and most important aspect it will keep heat inside much better than aluminum. Heat is important for winter tires if you are after maximum grip. And they are way more rigid for road potholes that show up from nowhere on the roads.
The metal wheels are significantly cheaper but they weigh a lot. Given I only get about 2.1mi/Kwh in winter I'm choosing efficiency over durability. Hopefully I don't dent my shiny new wheels this winter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was thinking of the Michelins- but the Blizzaks have worked so well for me.
I would have gotten steel wheels, but I did not see any listed with TireRack. Since they mount/balance and ship for ‘free’- plus I’ve had excellent results with them, I chose to buy from them.

I have the same tyres on my 2004 Chyrsler Pacifica AWD I inherited. I almost didn’t buy any since I still have the car- but I will just use when really nasty out. Economy is pretty poor (it is in suberb condition, but not really worth much).
I know that buying these was not the smartest thing in the world.
 

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I was thinking of the Michelins- but the Blizzaks have worked so well for me.
I would have gotten steel wheels, but I did not see any listed with TireRack. Since they mount/balance and ship for ‘free’- plus I’ve had excellent results with them, I chose to buy from them.
I'm mulling the same thing. My Jetta's winter tires were Blizzaks and they really worked well. The Michelin's are rated very well but are more expensive. I'm going to pull the trigger by the end of this month.
Can I ask is that a 80's Honda six cylinder?
 

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It is a Benelli 750 sei. First production six motorcycle. I did a complete restoration myself. Pretty fun.
Not to transition to far off the main thread but where on earth do you get parts for a 1970's/80 bike? I remember the Honda six was one of the first bikes to use the engine block as part of the frame(it was also a royal pain to tune).
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
the big Benelli is quite easy to get almost every part. Most new parts ended up in Germany, but I did use a lot of new parts. I didn’t really need a lot of them, but I bought one new and I wanted this one to be as close mechanically to that as I could. With improvements in ignition, charging and wiring.
The Vincent in the 50s had the engine as a stressed member. A buddy of mine a a few of them and restoring one right now. Pretty interesting engineering.

Back to wheels/tyres- I got those wheels since they were the cheapest of the correct size. I don’t care much how they look, but seem fine. I chose to go 19” and same size all around. (Mine has 20” wheels stock)
 

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This is why I advise metal wheels for winter, wheels will mange better snow from sticking on the wheels and most important aspect it will keep heat inside much better than aluminum. Heat is important for winter tires if you are after maximum grip. And they are way more rigid for road potholes that show up from nowhere on the roads.
In addition, steel wheels do not shatter in severe impact scenarios. They might get bent but generally you can still drive. If using cast wheels in the winter I would go at least with forged wheels. They would have a better chance of surviving a severe pothole than a basic cast aluminum wheel.
 
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