Volkswagen ID Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered User
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Brief relevant background. I grew up in Quebec so I know that the skill set is far more important for driving in snow (or on gravel roads) than the number of driven wheels.

I've also been a VW owner since a split-screen van in the 70s in Europe with a Bug, a Passat and a bunch of Golfs since.

So, I've signed up for an id.4. But I'm unconvinced that the AWD, with the consequent loss of range, and greater turning radius is worth the better 0-60 time and marginally better cornering at the ragged edge of performance. I no longer play boy racer at stop lights.

But, maybe I missing something. I'm here to be enlightened. For a mostly urban driver in Texas, what benefits does AWD offer that justify the price and the trade-offs. Many thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered User
2021 ID.4 First Edition (Dusk Blue)
Joined
·
310 Posts
I wouldn't buy the AWD if I lived in Texas. Not worth the money, disregarding all the rest.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
694 Posts
The AWD version gets you; AWD, heated windshield, bumper hitch, better acceleration, larger turning radius, slightly less range. To me, the difference in range is meaningless, for others it is important. If you don't care about the better acceleration and I suspect you don't need the AWD or heated windshield in Texas. Then it comes down to the bumper hitch and larger turning radius. $3.8K seems like a lot to spend to get a bumper hitch. I reserved an AWD version as I presently live in Maine on a dirt road that doesn't get plowed by the town. But, we just bought a place in Virginia so I am considering changing my reservation to a RWD Pro S. In VA I don't need the AWD or the heated windshield, the question becomes how badly do I want a bumper hitch? I could always spend the $800 and install the AWD bumper carrier that has the mount for the hitch that the RWD version does not. Although I am not sure what would be needed for trailer wiring on the RWD version. Decisions decisions
 

·
Registered User
2021 ID.4 First Edition (Dusk Blue)
Joined
·
310 Posts
If they just want the hitch, they can just buy a FE that's sitting on the lot somewhere. Someone posted one in Colorado that was listed for 3800 under MSRP 😄
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
... as I presently live in Maine on a dirt road that doesn't get plowed by the town. But, we just bought a place in Virginia so I am considering changing my reservation to a RWD Pro S.
ixlr08 .... Thanks, you frame the issue well. And, if I was on a dirt road in Maine or similar, the AWD would be my choice too even if the range penalty was much greater.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
222 Posts
i drove rear wheel drive cars in the snow when it was mainly only Saabs that had FWD. There were a lot of Saabs up there at the time, too. I wouldn't want to do RWD again in snowy climates.

Big caveat here is the possibility that traction control, and computerized 'other stuff' may have eliminated this problem. I know physics hasn't changed.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
5 Posts
The range tradeoff of 10 miles to get the AWD is a good one. Low-speed acceleration difference between the RWD and AWD is pretty negligible but at freeway speeds, the RWD lacks any sort of appreciable kick while the AWD offers a measure of safety to quickly get out of the way.
  • Passing power going around someone going 5mph under the limit on a two lane highway or when a passing lane opens up and the jackass ahead of you decides to speed up. Having that extra HP to scoot around is really helpful.
  • AWD is also much safer if you spend any time trying to start moving from a dead stop on a wet hill (Seattle, San Francisco, etc).
 

·
Registered User
Glacier White/Lunar Grey 1st Edition with 19" Wheels
Joined
·
166 Posts
i drove rear wheel drive cars in the snow when it was mainly only Saabs that had FWD. There were a lot of Saabs up there at the time, too. I wouldn't want to do RWD again in snowy climates.

Big caveat here is the possibility that traction control, and computerized 'other stuff' may have eliminated this problem. I know physics hasn't changed.
An EV RWD should be much better in snow than the old ICE RWD cars due to more balanced weight distribution. AWD will be better, but the RWD ID.4 should suffice if you live in a place with dependable snow clearing infrastructure. Especially if you invest in some winter tires.
 

·
Registered User
Glacier White/Lunar Grey 1st Edition with 19" Wheels
Joined
·
166 Posts
The range tradeoff of 10 miles to get the AWD is a good one. Low-speed acceleration difference between the RWD and AWD is pretty negligible but at freeway speeds, the RWD lacks any sort of appreciable kick while the AWD offers a measure of safety to quickly get out of the way.
  • Passing power going around someone going 5mph under the limit on a two lane highway or when a passing lane opens up and the jackass ahead of you decides to speed up. Having that extra HP to scoot around is really helpful.
  • AWD is also much safer if you spend any time trying to start moving from a dead stop on a wet hill (Seattle, San Francisco, etc).
I used to drive a V6 Honda Accord and a hybrid Toyota Camry. I noticed a significant difference in highway power between the two and felt much more in control navigating difficult highway scenarios with the V6. I've driven about 2500 miles on the highway since getting my ID.4 a month ago. IMO, There is a surplus of power available in the 70-85 mph range to scoot around someone or out of dicey situations.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
... ... I've driven about 2500 miles on the highway since getting my ID.4 a month ago. IMO, There is a surplus of power available in the 70-85 mph range to scoot around someone or out of dicey situations.
Timbobh .... very useful direct knowledge ... much appreciated
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
267 Posts
For me, AWD gives the extra power that the RWD is lacking. I don’t need AWD and I don’t drive fast but I want that extra ummph and effortless acceleration that I’ve got in my Tesla.
 

·
Registered User
On order ID4 Pro AWD
Joined
·
50 Posts
An EV RWD should be much better in snow than the old ICE RWD cars due to more balanced weight distribution. AWD will be better, but the RWD ID.4 should suffice if you live in a place with dependable snow clearing infrastructure. Especially if you invest in some winter tires.
Totally agree. Watch the 2nd half of this 4 min video to see how well RWD ID4 performs in snow/ice. Good Winter tires make the difference.

In Texas, you probably don’t need the AWD.

In North America, the trend has become for all SUVs to be AWD, but on the RWD ID4 MEB platform, it seems like it’s not as necessary. AWD has some extra benefits. But good winter tires will give you stability & traction.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Totally agree. Watch the 2nd half of this 4 min video to see how well RWD ID4 performs in snow/ice. Good Winter tires make the difference.
SexyB ... thanks, great vid. Took my 08 Rabbit (then with with 100K miles) up the Alaska Highway to see friends in Whitehorse during the 2017 winter and confirmed (again to myself) that driving skills, VW handling in general, and winter tires in particular were far more important than AWD in low-friction conditions. Texans spinning their monster 4x4s into ditches during last February's (not-really-that-bad) ice storm while the Rabbit deftly moved along confirmed that bias. In any event, thanks again for the vid.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
17 Posts
Brief relevant background. I grew up in Quebec so I know that the skill set is far more important for driving in snow (or on gravel roads) than the number of driven wheels.

I've also been a VW owner since a split-screen van in the 70s in Europe with a Bug, a Passat and a bunch of Golfs since.

So, I've signed up for an id.4. But I'm unconvinced that the AWD, with the consequent loss of range, and greater turning radius is worth the better 0-60 time and marginally better cornering at the ragged edge of performance. I no longer play boy racer at stop lights.

But, maybe I missing something. I'm here to be enlightened. For a mostly urban driver in Texas, what benefits does AWD offer that justify the price and the trade-offs. Many thanks in advance.
I reserved an AWD but after some thought I decided to lease a RWD 1st edition. I'm 68, don't speed much anymore and I'm retired so I don't have to drive in snow. I expect the AWD will deplete the battery quicker too. That reminds me I have to cancel my reservation. Good luck. Hopefully by the time you get yours VW will have fixed the issues with the infotainment system.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just pre ordered a 2021 ID4 AWD Pro here in Ontario, Canada, and I asked about the functionality regarding the dual motor and AWD, and was told that it's RWD, and switches to AWD only when needed. Same goes for the dual motor. When puttering around town, you're only using the single motor until you punch it.

This would explain why the range is negligible between the two options because if it was full time AWD and dual motor, the range would be significantly less.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
3 Posts
i drove rear wheel drive cars in the snow when it was mainly only Saabs that had FWD. There were a lot of Saabs up there at the time, too. I wouldn't want to do RWD again in snowy climates.

Big caveat here is the possibility that traction control, and computerized 'other stuff' may have eliminated this problem. I know physics hasn't changed.
A big difference is that the battery pack I believe adds most of its weight over the rear wheels of the ID4 giving it good traction in snow.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
540 Posts

·
Registered User
Joined
·
190 Posts
What you guys have experienced driving ICE cars in the winter RWD all of this is irrelevant.
Electric EV with almost 50:50 distribution on weight and good winter tires will do extremely well..because EV are more heavy than ICE and have much more faster response time that are not just controlled by electronic brake controlls ....but also EV has inverter controlled electric motor that is way more faster to react to slipping or applying power.
Before you jump ship for AWD try first RWD with winter tires in the snow or ice....
For AWD crowd...
AWD has advantages over RWD in deep snow and extreme weather conditions.....
Is it really necessary.
Yes if you living at places where is a lot of hills and roads are poorly maintained in the winter.
If you don't mind spending money for winter set of tires you will do better in the snow than ID4 AWD with out winter tires...
And EV AWD are not true full time distribution...it is on demand front motor applying power.
Before people start replying....All EV makers with EV doing this and it is to make more miles per charge running one motor most of the time.
So someone driving in the winter with AWD is still be driving on RWD and only feel the front engaged if there is quite high loss of traction on the RWD side.
Only ture AWD EV is if you have option in the menu that gives you to choose keeping F and R motor active non stop.
 

·
Registered User
Pro S w/Gradient AWD
Joined
·
70 Posts
We live in Washington State the West side of the mountains, so it doesn't snow here much. But when it does, those 2 snow plows have a big job to do. I like to additional security of the AWD, the additional acceleration and all the added features the come with the AWD model.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top