Volkswagen ID Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered User
2021 ID.4 Pro S Gradient
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I say cool weather because that is all we really get in central Alabama.

I have a WallBox EVSE programmed to charge between 9:01pm and 4:59am 7 days/week. This is when I get the kwh rate reduction from my Power Company.
My ID.4 is in an enclosed building on 3 sides and with a roof. But the building has no door and it a very old cypress shed with plenty of flow through ventilation. Zero insulation and plenty of air flow. It doesn't get rained on is really the only protection.

Night before last it got down to 30-32F and at 5:30am CarNet showed it was charged to 80% and a range of 171 miles.

This morning it is 31F and it is 5:30am. CarNet showes it charged to 80% with a range of 198 miles. What is the difference between the two charging sessions? After the charge started last evening at 9:01pm I opened the WallBox app and deleted the scheduled charging schedule. The charging continued as previously programmed, but with the scheduling turned off the ID.4 can draw power as needed. The difference in this example is a cool 27 miles.

I can imagine now the major difference those of you in cold climates have to live with looking at this relatively minor impact on me.
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
71 Posts
The difference in estimated range at 80% has more to do with the efficiency you got while driving the vehicle right before charging. The car calculates the "miles added per hour of charging" based on this ever-changing number. This efficiency number is dependent on a number of different variables, including ambient temperature, terrain, how fast you were driving, how aggressively you were driving, wind resistance, etc. The number of "miles" added to the car while charging is always an estimate. If you want to test whether or not your charging is actually slower (i.e. adding fewer kWh over a certain time) in colder weather, you'd have to find the number of kWh added and how long it took to add them.

This is why I generally find "miles added per hour of charging" a not very useful metric — because it's always changing depending on the season, the weather, the terrain, and what type of driving you've been doing. I'm much more interested in the number of kWh added and what my recent efficiency (miles per kWh) has been in certain conditions — e.g. if the car shows that I've been getting 3.8 miles per kWh recently driving locally at under 45 mph on flat roads in warm weather, and I have an upcoming trip planned where I'll be driving mostly 70 mph on the freeway in cold weather up into the mountains, I know my efficiency numbers will drop and whatever the guess-o-meter range is displaying based on my 3.8 miles per kWh will be wrong to use for the freeway trip. But having driven my car before in freeway conditions, I know I usually get 3.0 miles per kWh in those conditions, so I can calculate in my head what my expected range should be, and as I drive up into the mountains, the car will recalculate the range on the fly. When I go to charge that night, the "miles added per hour" will then be calculated based on the 3.0 miles per kWh efficiency, and the range estimate will only be accurate if I'm going to do the same type of driving.

(Source: I've charged and driven an EV in three-going-on-four New England winters)
 

·
Registered User
2021 ID.4 Pro, Glacier White
Joined
·
394 Posts
The difference in estimated range at 80% has more to do with the efficiency you got while driving the vehicle right before charging. The car calculates the "miles added per hour of charging" based on this ever-changing number.
Bingo!! - The numbers on the GOM have nothing to do with how the car was charged or how long it took to charge. They are a 'guess' of how far you can go on the charge currently in the battery based on your recent driving efficiency and those numbers will change all the time. If your most recent driving was at lower speeds, the GOM will think you can go farther than if your last trip was all freeway, because it assumes you'll be doing the same sort of driving when you leave home this time . . . . but it has no idea what you'll do of course, so it's frequently wrong
 

·
Registered User
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
When you travel across country and you are in cold weather conditions example 20-27°F ....whenever you hit 22% SOC it will remind you to search for charging.
Your actual efficiency will still be over 3.2 miles/Kw driving at 65 MPH.... But Climatronic will continue calculation on how much energy it will take from battery during the trip....and continues to lower available miles you can actually use .
Expect 0.5- 0.9 miles per kWh of battery for heating. Try to keep shorter legs between charging and try to calculate end of driving ( getting to next charging within 10-15% SOC or use something like ABRP app).
This way you will keep battery in good temperature condition and will not use onboard battery heater.
So far i didn't have problems keeping my comfort at 75°F and traveling 2800 miles across the country with temperature 24-60°F .
Insulation is quite amazing on ID4 vs other EV i have tried in the winter .
Keep tires at 42 PSI and try to stay at 65mph and you will always have energy to spare before hitting next charging location.
ICE cars are no different in the winter
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top