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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've seen a few reports of dimensions for the ID.Buzz but nothing specific recently. I saw one early report of 4650mm long, 1910mm wide and 1870mm high and another of 4942 x 1976 x 1963. Any more recent data?

In case it helps VW :), I'd vote for "not too large, please". We used to have a Toyota Previa and we loved it. It was 4749 x 1803 x ~1803 (187" x 71" x ~70"). The layout in the Previa was very efficient: the third row seats folded to the sides and away so we usually used it as a 4 seater (us + 2 kids) with plenty of extra space for stuff.
 

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187". So that is 15 1/2' long. As long it is long enough for 3 rows of seating, storage behind 3rd row, and long enough to hold a long range battery in a low profile form factor.... I'm good. ;>

Width-wise, my sister had to search for weeks to locate an SUV that was wide enough to hold two child seats, and still fit mom in the middle. Perhaps VW would care to capitalize that you don't seem to find such form factors on every street corner. ;>
 

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The information confirming production schedule of the ID Buzz for both Europe and The US mentioned two different length versions. Europe will get both and US the longer one with larger battery (111 kWh if I recall right). Which is probably the right call since all smaller vans in The US (remember how small the Honda Odyssey was in the 90s) are now bigger or no longer sold here.

I think that the ID Buzz is going to be more special (unique) than the ID.4 and have a cult following for years to come. Just have no real need for a vehicle that big. As I struggle with the idea that ID.4 is to big for me already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I can see the benefit of a larger battery in the US as 6-8 hour trips at highway speeds are common, but I'd rather have a more compact size. The Previa is mid-engine with a nice flat floor. We had 4 bucket seats and in that configuration we had a huge space behind the second row. Adding the 3rd row added seating for 3 people / kids, and still left space behind the 3rd row. The second row could be removed with some work. Compared to the Previa, the ID.Buzz supposedly will have an even more flexible seating layout and a more space-efficient power platform; I doubt I'd need any bigger car than that.

We will see... I'm crossing my fingers. I loved the Previa. It was surprisingly useful even around town; at least here in California. It also had a lot of personality :)
 

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The information confirming production schedule of the ID Buzz for both Europe and The US mentioned two different length versions. Europe will get both and US the longer one with larger battery (111 kWh if I recall right). Which is probably the right call since all smaller vans in The US (remember how small the Honda Odyssey was in the 90s) are now bigger or no longer sold here.

I think that the ID Buzz is going to be more special (unique) than the ID.4 and have a cult following for years to come. Just have no real need for a vehicle that big. As I struggle with the idea that ID.4 is to big for me already.
I'm on the opposite side of this. As an Odyssey owner with kids I'm going to need something large enough to haul people and gear around. Hitch and roof racks are a must, as well and folding seats. You are right, the new Odysseys are a cavern, and most owners buy them for the practicality and immense interior volume. I grew up with a Westy and would love to see a camper conversion or pop roof on the Buzz eventually.
 

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I think it also come down to weight and efficiency. Hopefully whatever size the van is it will be an optimal blend of strength to weight. Sandy Munroe is doing a walk-through of the ID.4 right now and I have to say, although it is a beautiful looking car it is not being terribly efficient with its use of materials. This of course is not an ID.4 sub-forum, but in both Sandy's post and another recent youtube video that compares the ID.4 to a Tesla Model Y (which the ID.4 loses on virtually every measure) I couldn't help but to notice that the ID.4 has room for some engineering iterations. I am hopeful that the ID.BUZZ will be a more iterated vehicle than the ID.4.

This is not to dis the ID.4! I am gratified that an automaker is producing something that slips into the Model Y's nitch (price range, specs, etc). It's a very narrow field at present. ;>
 

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I'd suggest reading through that thread discussing Sandy's observations to get a more well-rounded perspective on his points. One of them relevant to your concern is that the ID4 is on the MEB platform, which will also be the same for the AWD (an extra motor in the front thereby filling that "empty" space he criticized the RWD ID4 for having) and the Buzz.

The MEB is the iterated platform :)

The Buzz is going to need to have enough room for a couple 10'+ longboards. The only thing I don't like from what I've seen are that the two front seats aren't completely removable. They slide to the rear and swivel. We should be able to put a front bench in place of a captain's seat!
 

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I'd suggest reading through that thread discussing Sandy's observations to get a more well-rounded perspective on his points. One of them relevant to your concern is that the ID4 is on the MEB platform, which will also be the same for the AWD (an extra motor in the front thereby filling that "empty" space he criticized the RWD ID4 for having) and the Buzz.

The MEB is the iterated platform :)
Good idea. I had neglected to go through the comments, although I do know the comments section can really add context to the point of view the video producer is putting forth. But even after reading through quite a few of them I'm not sure my original take is tempered much. For example we now know that an EV can have its components optimized to allow for a "frunk". Some new EVs have mimicked Tesla (in a good way) and have extra storage up front. It was noteworthy that the ID.4 does not.

Sandy has another video out today covering the under carriage of the car. In several areas this does not look much like a clean-sheet design. For instance, VW seems to have saved money by opting for old style drum brakes on the rear wheels, but then splurges (unnecessarily, according to Sandy) on the pricey aluminum suspension components. Other examples were cited. So, yes, the ID.4 is an iterated design, but in my humble view there's more than can be done, and I would LOVE it if further design refinements show up in the Microbus.

The Buzz is going to need to have enough room for a couple 10'+ longboards. The only thing I don't like from what I've seen are that the two front seats aren't completely removable. They slide to the rear and swivel. We should be able to put a front bench in place of a captain's seat!
Good point! I really think that the more "extensibility" they build into this vehicle (like taking a page from the Rivian and Canoo), the more successful the BUZZ will be. I have to say I am gratified though to learn from you that the front seats will swivel. I have owned two Westies, and it is a delight to be able to swing the chairs around and swing the dinner table out to enjoy a meal with friends aka restaurant booth style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
re: drum brakes - my understanding is that drum brakes work better than disc brakes when they are used very infrequently - which is what happens under some use patterns with a regenerating system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
As an Odyssey owner with kids I'm going to need something large enough to haul people and gear around.
I did a quick check on CarConnection between a 1997 Previa and a 2021 Sienna and their database says that the Previa is substantially shorter but has substantially more internal cargo volume.

The comparison may not be 100% fair. The crash standards have improved since 1997 and the Sienna has bigger seats, more insulation, and other comfort features. Plus there there may even be changes in measurements by TheCarConnection. Still, I hope that the MEB platform will yield a very efficient envelope, like the mid-engine of the Previa did.

Links

Previa
Length: 187.0
Width: 70.8
Height: 70.5
Cargo volume to Seat 1: 157.8
Cargo volume to Seat 2: 85.5
Cargo volume to Seat 3: 32.5

Sienna 2021
Length: 203.5
Width: 78.5
Height: 68.5
Cargo volume to Seat 1: 101
Cargo volume to Seat 2: 75.2
Cargo volume to Seat 3: 33.5

Anyhow, looking forward to an ID.Buzz... ideally one I can afford :)
 

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re: drum brakes - my understanding is that drum brakes work better than disc brakes when they are used very infrequently - which is what happens under some use patterns with a regenerating system.
Sandy liked the fact they had drum brakes. He mentioned car companies switched to disk brakes as they "grab" better and didn't fade, however, with ABS and other technologies now, there is no reason for companies not to go back to the cheaper drum brakes (and I don't think he was referring to just EVs).
 
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I initially thought the same until I did more research. Turns out the rear drum brakes are awesome, they are fully enclosed maintenance free closed system. Done because with regenerative breaking you don’t need the power of a disk, and with such infrequent use, you don’t get the corrosion and depletion that you would otherwise get. I live is a harsh climate with salt covered roads half of the year, having a closed braking system and aluminum suspension is a dream.
 

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Sandy signed off on the rear drums with no problem. I would think that even with regen braking supplementing normal stops, it really comes down to a question of stopping power in an emergency. It had always been my perception that disc brakes have more stopping power, on the basis that with drums the shoes are pushing outward against the rotating drum from only one side, but with discs you are squeezing/pinching the pads against both sides of the rotor and they get a better grip. I still tend to thinks that's true, but I doubt that any auto maker would produce a car with less emergency stopping power. Since the majority of the braking is performed by the front wheels that may be how they can pull it off.

Also, I have changed a lot of drum brakes in my career as a backyard mechanic and at least the older systems anyway were not sealed. I suspect that a drum brake that goes unused (due to regen) will rust up, just as a disc rotor will (unless the rotor/drum material is made out of a more expensive alloy that GM developed to retard rusting). The EV industry claims that one reason EVs are less polluting is due to emitting less brake dust into the environment. But they may be referring strictly to disc brakes.
 
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