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Most of ours (MD) was a good read, but I get the feeling a deadline loomed. The main section was fine. If I'm hyper-critical, things got a bit loose in the appendix with stuff like the chart below. Even looking at the pages before and after I have no idea what this was trying to communicate. To be fair, this was the only completely borked chart.
Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel
 

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Most of ours (MD) was a good read, but I get the feeling a deadline loomed. The main section was fine. If I'm hyper-critical, things got a bit loose in the appendix with stuff like the chart below. Even looking at the pages before and after I have no idea what this was trying to communicate. To be fair, this was the only completely borked chart.
View attachment 15693
I got uninterested after 10 or so minutes (also MD). I'm planning to save it for "throne room" reading.
 

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I got uninterested after 10 or so minutes (also MD). I'm planning to save it for "throne room" reading.
I confess I skimmed through the initial read. But the parts that caught my eye were on pages 17 and 22, and kinda page 6.
  • Page 17 illustrates current chargers with the red dots representing chargers that meet Federal specs (150+ kW). There's nothing in Southern MD or the Eastern Shore, and very few in Western MD. Only the 95 and 270 corridors are well served. This basically matches Plugshare if you filter for CCS of 120+ kW. Side note: It's depressing how well built out the Supercharger network is in comparison.
  • Page 22 has the locations required to meet minimum spacing for Federal alternative fuel routes.
 

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I confess I skimmed through the initial read. But the parts that caught my eye were on pages 17 and 22, and kinda page 6.
  • Page 17 illustrates current chargers with the red dots representing chargers that meet Federal specs (150+ kW). There's nothing in Southern MD or the Eastern Shore, and very few in Western MD. Only the 95 and 270 corridors are well served. This basically matches Plugshare if you filter for CCS of 120+ kW. Side note: It's depressing how well built out the Supercharger network is in comparison.
  • Page 22 has the locations required to meet minimum spacing for Federal alternative fuel routes.
For eastern shore, the Delaware plan is better, but that only gets you so far. I haven't looked at Virginia yet - maybe they threw us a bone.
 

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All the ones I care about were underwhelming.


Almost like they couldn't include Tesla superchargers because they aren't yet NEVI compliant, but states are hedging their bets that Tesla will add CCS connectors soon and become compliant stations, thus letting those states off the hook on rollouts.
 

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For eastern shore, the Delaware plan is better, but that only gets you so far. I haven't looked at Virginia yet - maybe they threw us a bone.
They didn't address 460 between Richmond and Lynchburg. 🤦‍♂️
 

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All the ones I care about were underwhelming.


Almost like they couldn't include Tesla superchargers because they aren't yet NEVI compliant, but states are hedging their bets that Tesla will add CCS connectors soon and become compliant stations, thus letting those states off the hook on rollouts.
On the other hand they didn't address broken 50kW chargers that are unlikely to ever be repaired. They listed them to illustrate what is currently "available".
 

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Almost like they couldn't include Tesla superchargers because they aren't yet NEVI compliant, but states are hedging their bets that Tesla will add CCS connectors soon and become compliant stations, thus letting those states off the hook on rollouts.
So many questions here.
  • Considering Tesla use CCS in Europe, will they switch here to standardise manufacturing?
  • Tesla v1 and v2 superchargers are too slow to meet FHWA specs even with a CCS handle, will they be replaced with v3 (or v4)? Just checked PlugShare and it appears that they already have a lot of v3's deployed.
  • What is Tesla's long tern strategy? So far they're ahead of the market (at least in my neck of the woods), but will they remain that way in 5-10 years. 5 years ago EA didn't have a single charger deployed.
  • Will Tesla go beyond adding a few CCS to each charging location and convert their cars to CCS?
 

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So many questions here.
  • Considering Tesla use CCS in Europe, will they switch here to standardise manufacturing?
  • Tesla v1 and v2 superchargers are too slow to meet FHWA specs even with a CCS handle, will they be replaced with v3 (or v4)? Just checked PlugShare and it appears that they already have a lot of v3's deployed.
  • What is Tesla's long tern strategy? So far they're ahead of the market (at least in my neck of the woods), but will they remain that way in 5-10 years. 5 years ago EA didn't have a single charger deployed.
  • Will Tesla go beyond adding a few CCS to each charging location and convert their cars to CCS?
The European CCS plug is different than the one that we have, and that's mainly because the top part (the J1772) plug is different in Europe. Mainly to support 3-phase AC power, which is rare in US households.

We don't know Tesla's long term strategy. To some extent it is driven by the whims of Elon, and whatever notion percolates to the top of his brain and somehow escapes from his mouth. They have made statements that they will support charging CCS cars in the US, but absolutely no details have emerged as to how they might implement this.

The only reason that Tesla switched to CCS in Europe is that they were forced to. Without government forcing them to switch here, they won't do it unless there are strong technical reasons. Maybe for 800V? Maybe to better support even higher charging powers? Maybe Cybertruck (will we ever see that thing - I am starting to have my doubts)?
 

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I checked Wyoming's plans because I would like them to finish the I-80 corridor because I have reason to drive through there on occasion. Talk about dragging their feet. It's full of exemption requests for the distance between station requirements. Lots of bellyaching about how these will never be economically viable and how nobody there wants to host them. Then the federal DOT response is to deny all by two of their exemption requests. Bureaucratic drama at its finest.
 

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I checked Wyoming's plans because I would like them to finish the I-80 corridor because I have reason to drive through there on occasion. Talk about dragging their feet. It's full of exemption requests for the distance between station requirements. Lots of bellyaching about how these will never be economically viable and how nobody there wants to host them. Then the federal DOT response is to deny all by two of their exemption requests. Bureaucratic drama at its finest.
Yeah, some EV-unfriendly or EV-neutral states want to feed at the trough of big federal NEVI $$$ but don’t want to follow the rules. Good to see the feds sticking to their guns.
 

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The European CCS plug is different than the one that we have, and that's mainly because the top part (the J1772) plug is different in Europe. Mainly to support 3-phase AC power, which is rare in US households.

We don't know Tesla's long term strategy. To some extent it is driven by the whims of Elon, and whatever notion percolates to the top of his brain and somehow escapes from his mouth. They have made statements that they will support charging CCS cars in the US, but absolutely no details have emerged as to how they might implement this.

The only reason that Tesla switched to CCS in Europe is that they were forced to. Without government forcing them to switch here, they won't do it unless there are strong technical reasons. Maybe for 800V? Maybe to better support even higher charging powers? Maybe Cybertruck (will we ever see that thing - I am starting to have my doubts)?


it's already announced that they ARE adding CCS cables to their network. that was a condition of this federal money they've applied for. i'm hoping they use it to retrofit existing stations, instead of building new ones.


look up the pilot program in Europe. it was easier to do there (because CCS was forced on them), but they're gathering data from that pilot, to hopefully use here in the US. it will take some time, but between Chargepoint, EVgo, EA, and Tesla, we'll have very good coverage in most places.
 

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<SNIP>
The only reason that Tesla switched to CCS in Europe is that they were forced to. Without government forcing them to switch here, they won't do it unless there are strong technical reasons. Maybe for 800V? Maybe to better support even higher charging powers? Maybe Cybertruck (will we ever see that thing - I am starting to have my doubts)?
Not just Europe, most of Oceania use CCS, and China uses a third (GB/T).
And if they're already adding CCS to superchargers... it may not be as big of a leap.
 
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