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Does anyone have tips or tricks for fire related safety with regular garaged charging? I’m sure incidents of EV fires while charging are quite low but a fire in the garage could cause severe loss of property or loss of life.

I’m installing smoke detector above the vehicle hooked into home monitoring system. I already have a fire extinguisher in the garage but my understanding is this will do little against chemical fire from battery.
 

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Does anyone have tips or tricks for fire related safety with regular garaged charging? I’m sure incidents of EV fires while charging are quite low but a fire in the garage could cause severe loss of property or loss of life.

I’m installing smoke detector above the vehicle hooked into home monitoring system. I already have a fire extinguisher in the garage but my understanding is this will do little against chemical fire from battery.
I live in a city where night time temperatures in the garage can be 80-100 degrees depending on the month. So far I have had no issues when Level 2 garage charging. I too am concerned because of problems with other makes.

i
 

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Does anyone have tips or tricks for fire related safety with regular garaged charging? I’m sure incidents of EV fires while charging are quite low but a fire in the garage could cause severe loss of property or loss of life.

I’m installing smoke detector above the vehicle hooked into home monitoring system. I already have a fire extinguisher in the garage but my understanding is this will do little against chemical fire from battery.
Generally you don’t want a smoke detector in your garage. That is because the environment in a garage is ripe for false alarms. Having similar thoughts I’ve been doing research and came to the conclusion that you want a heat detector. Either a fixed or rapid rise or combination. I haven’t pulled the trigger on mine yet but am also planning on getting one installed and tied into our alarm monitoring. Since we a generally asleep when charging happens we might not know anything is wrong until it is very far along. While I wouldn’t expect anything to happen sometimes just having that extra peace of mind is enough.
 

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Generally you don’t want a smoke detector in your garage. That is because the environment in a garage is ripe for false alarms. Having similar thoughts I’ve been doing research and came to the conclusion that you want a heat detector.
FWIW, I installed a smoke detector in my garage and haven't had any false alarms. The one time it went off was when I used a new heat gun for the first time, which surprised me as there was no visible smoke and very little to smell. Good idea about the heat detector, though. I'll quickly migrate to that solution if we do ever get false alarms.
 

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A smoke detector in a garage is a bad idea, too high a chance of false alarms. Look for “rate of rise” detectors that alarm if the temperature rises suddenly.

Fire extinguisher is useless against a battery fire (useful against other kinds of fire). Huge quantity of water is the official fire dept method but that really only prevents spread until the battery has finished burning.

Get your family out quickly, stay at a safe distance until the fire department have done their job, is the only sensible course of action. Takes discipline because it’ll seem like the fire dept take a long time to arrive and you’ll have fight/flight adrenaline compelling you to do something.

Chances of a battery fire are very low. VW would have taken steps to learn from the mistakes of others.
 

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Does anyone have tips or tricks for fire related safety with regular garaged charging? I’m sure incidents of EV fires while charging are quite low but a fire in the garage could cause severe loss of property or loss of life.

I’m installing smoke detector above the vehicle hooked into home monitoring system. I already have a fire extinguisher in the garage but my understanding is this will do little against chemical fire from battery.
ICE fires are far far more common. The Chevy Bolt fires are less than 20 vehicles world wide out of over 140k Bolts sold, that’s statistically a very small number. Listen to this recent excellent podcast from a auto journalist veteran who touches on the subject, It should give you peace of mind. I owned a Chevy Bolt 2017, a Prius Prime, TM3, and now a ID 4 all have been charged in same garage, no issues.
‎Winning In Asia: A ZoZo Go Podcast: John McElroy, Founder, Autoline TV: Where Is the Global Auto Industry Going And Which Company Will Take Us There Fastest? on Apple Podcasts
 

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Until the recent Bolt debacle, this was never an issue at all because the odds of a car burning down a garage (and/or a house) were a thousand to one more likely to happen with ICE's than with EV's

Recall the Ford problems about 15 years ago where some parked, not running vehicles burned down a few buildings

For EV's, I'm trusting that any unusual problems (like the Bolt) will come to life and be well known before it takes out my garage. With a battery fire there really isn't much you could do with detectors or extinguishers - The only hope would be that you parked it outside that night

Don
 

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A smoke detector in a garage is a bad idea, too high a chance of false alarms. Look for “rate of rise” detectors that alarm if the temperature rises suddenly.
In Massachusetts they're required in new construction. Of all the false alarms I've had so far they've all been from the detector close to the kitchen! No surprise there. I'm happy having a detector inside my garage, especially since I am charging a car inside it.
 

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As others have said, heat detectors are best for the garage. The best course of action for a fire anywhere in your home is to get all occupants out and call 911. Property can be replaced but lives can't. Let the professionals fight the fire.
 

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In Massachusetts they're required in new construction. Of all the false alarms I've had so far they've all been from the detector close to the kitchen! No surprise there. I'm happy having a detector inside my garage, especially since I am charging a car inside it.
You've misunderstood.

It is essential to fit the correct fire-detection device for the environment. A rate-of-rise detector looks exactly like a smoke detector but detects sudden increases in temperature rather than smoke.

Interestingly in many jurisdictions it is not permitted to construct garages from combustible materials.
 

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You could rig up a system that automatically pulls your burning car out of the garage. Or build a ramp in the garage that slopes towards the door.

ICE cars catch on fire frequently but nobody worries about them burning down the house.
 

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You could rig up a system that automatically pulls your burning car out of the garage. Or build a ramp in the garage that slopes towards the door.

ICE cars catch on fire frequently but nobody worries about them burning down the house.
ICEV fires are comparatively easy to put out and take a very long time to get going. Real life isn't like Hollywood. BEV fires (while rare) are exceptionally fierce and very difficult to extinguish.

It is much better just to not build a garage from combustible materials in the first place.
 

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ICEV fires are comparatively easy to put out and take a very long time to get going. Real life isn't like Hollywood. BEV fires (while rare) are exceptionally fierce and very difficult to extinguish.

It is much better just to not build a garage from combustible materials in the first place.
Not feasible in many cases. I have a two story suburban home with a bedroom above the garage. The garage is really an integrated part of the home itself.
 

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Until the recent Bolt debacle, this was never an issue at all because the odds of a car burning down a garage (and/or a house) were a thousand to one more likely to happen with ICE's than with EV's

Recall the Ford problems about 15 years ago where some parked, not running vehicles burned down a few buildings

For EV's, I'm trusting that any unusual problems (like the Bolt) will come to life and be well known before it takes out my garage. With a battery fire there really isn't much you could do with detectors or extinguishers - The only hope would be that you parked it outside that night

Don
More Ford fire recalls. Engine Fires Linked To 4.6M Recalled Fords
Even recently with 2020 Explorer.
Ford recalling 2020 Explorer for fire risk
 

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You've misunderstood.

It is essential to fit the correct fire-detection device for the environment. A rate-of-rise detector looks exactly like a smoke detector but detects sudden increases in temperature rather than smoke.
I do understand, and I don't disagree that rate-of-rise detector may in fact be a better solution for a garage, but when the Fire Inspectors arrive and tell you a smoke and fire detector is required by state law, you install one or you don't get an occupancy permit. :confused:
 

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If your charger circuit is properly wired chance of fire while charging is very low. Much lower than dying in a car accident. So the easiest thing that you can do is to first check your circuit/wiring/circuit breaker and make sure they are up to the task. Second is to use a lower charging rate, for example if you are using a 30 amp circuit you can charge at 20 instead of 24 amp. Leaving more headroom in the charger/circuit and car charger will reduce heat buildup and improve safety.
 

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If your charger circuit is properly wired chance of fire while charging is very low. Much lower than dying in a car accident. So the easiest thing that you can do is to first check your circuit/wiring/circuit breaker and make sure they are up to the task. Second is to use a lower charging rate, for example if you are using a 30 amp circuit you can charge at 20 instead of 24 amp. Leaving more headroom in the charger/circuit and car charger will reduce heat buildup and improve safety.
Much smarter people than myself developed EV chargers/technology and a very competent licensed electrician installed mine. Tesla home charger: 48amp output with 11.5kW ID 4 on board charger with 40-44mph charging speeds. I am not neutering it’s capability because of FUD 😱. "The greatest risk is of risk less living". Steven Covey
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Safest thing to do is park your car (EV or ICE) in the middle of a field, 100+ feet away from your house.

Also, hide under bed next to your gold bars, while wearing tinfoil hat and asbestos PJs.
 
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Not feasible in many cases. I have a two story suburban home with a bedroom above the garage. The garage is really an integrated part of the home itself.
In which case it is VERY, VERY, important that the garage is fully fireproof.

That arrangement is very common where I live, but there are very strict rules about habitable space above a garage. The construction would have to be brick/fire board, with fire-doors between the garage and house,
 

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The construction would have to be brick/fire board, with fire-doors between the garage and house,
The same thing is building code required for most of the US (and even for any garage that is attached to the house), but we have very poor to no enforcement of the codes in many places.
 
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