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My take from reading countless threads is that many owners consider hardwired "permanent" or "more difficult" or "not DIY friendly."

Really, it's none of those. I would consider installing a receptacle more labor intensive than splicing 6 AWG copper using a split bolt, and if the wiring can be extended from the breaker directly to a terminal block inside the EVSE (no splice) even better!

The thinking should be reversed: default to hardwired unless there's a necessity for a plug-in, namely that it's going to need to be unplugged from time to time. Hardwired really isn't that much different than removing a 12 volt battery from a car -- tools are required, a little bit of time is necessary, but it's not particularly difficult.
 

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...I presume that the reason for this is to prevent one from disconnecting the device and moving to a location served by a different utility.
Maybe. I would expect if the utility is requiring hardwiring to take part in their program, it's because they want to promote a safer and more reliable installation. Is some lowlife wants to take advantage of the program and pocket the rebate, I can't imagine a little twist-twist / snip-snip wouldn't be much of a deterrent.
 

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So do you think there are a large percentage of “lowlifes” among the population of EV owners?
No, that's why I think they stipulate hardwired installations for safety reasons. I can't imagine they're really worried about being hoodwinked by their customers in any meaningful way.
 

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Clipper Creek, for one, has a "Share2" 64A dual-EVSE that feeds off of one 80A circuit. So for a household with two or three EVs, this one high capacity circuit would allow simultaneous charging of two vehicles.
 

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With every car manufacturer release new EVs do really believe they will never have an EV that can charge at 80amps again? In 5 years every EV may be able to charge at that rate.
I don't think it's a matter of "can they/will they."

I look at it from the user perspective. I think it's safe to say that most users don't need 80 amps for one vehicle.

Most users can fully recharge overnight with just 24 amps.

I expect we're at a battery sweet spot, and they're not going to grow much larger in capacity. I doubt most cars aren't going to get any less efficient. Most drivers' average daily mileage isn't going to change.

Then there's the impracticality of higher rates: today's battery technology is better off with a lower rate of charge. The electrical grid is certainly better of if every house on the block isn't suddenly pulling 80 amps at midnight.

I'm not suggesting 80 amp service isn't warranted, just that for any single vehicle in most daily usage cases it's unnecessary, even if it's capable.
 

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That's still going to be the exception, not the norm.

The norm is going to be two or more EVs per household, so again, 80 amp service is warranted, but in most cases not for any one vehicle.

I can't italicize most any more then I already have.
 

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I'm in the same boat with cat 5 cable and pots telephone copper at the tail end of a way too long remodel.

At least if wireless car charging ever catches on, the need will remain for these EVSE circuits we're installing to power the charging pads.
 
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