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What EVs can pull higher than 48 amps when charging? I thought none of them did. Early Teslas did, but not new ones.

What’s the reason to install an 80 amp circuit at home?
 

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I will try to price out a 100 amp circuit and compare it with the 60 amp circuit price.

I wanted to get a Tesla Gen 2 charger with the J1772 connector, but they are suddenly gone from the Tesla site (not just marked as “out of stock” but gone altogether). They were introduced on November 1, so I’m not sure what happened there. I had to buy a 48 amp a Tesla Gen 3 adapter ($85 more), but it’s still a bargain. However, now I need to get a Tesla to J1772 adapter, and those are expensive.
 

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An 80 Amp circuit is very large for a home. Most homes have 200 Amps total coming into the house. Older homes less. Unless you routinely need to charge in a time that is less than overnight a 50A circuit absolutely fine. And, remember the faster you charge the harder it is on the battery, so fast charging at home really buys you nearly nothing.
You can’t charge at Level 2 with more current than the vehicle requests. Both Tesla and ID.4 can pull 48 amps from the circuit and not any higher regardless of what the charger is capable of.

However, as many have pointed out, the newer vehicles will enable 80 amp charging. For a standard sub-100 kWh battery, charging at 48 amps or even 40 amps would fill the battery from near 0% to near 100% overnight, so the battery would be charged by the time you wake up.

However, what if you need to charge a 200 kWh battery (like in the new Hummer EV or in a CyberTruck)? If you are going to use a 48 amp charger (at 240 V), you will be charging at about 11 kW, which would take you something like 18 hours to charge the battery fully. An 80-amp charger would be charging at about 19 kW, which would charge the battery from 0% to 100% in under 11 hours.

No one actually charges from 0% to 100% at home, so we are talking about 8-9 hours to charge a 200 kWh battery on a 80 amp charger, whereas a 48 amp charger would take 15-16 hours or so, which is already problematic.

I will definitely get a quote for a 100-amp circuit to future proof it for an 80 amp charger if I ever need one.
 

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That's going to be one heck of a quote! o_O Most USA folks now have 200A service, but many still at 100A and your quote would be for a circuit handling half or all of that. So in addition to heavier EVSE-feed wire gauge and breakers likely heavier grid-entry wire and larger capacity entry panel, bordering on commercial application!!

Related: most of the homes in my 3-year old retiree-downsized development have 100A service. When I roughed-in for a 48/40A EVSE during construction that alone drove me to an interior 200A panel. Thankfully the line off the transformer to my current NEC exterior disconnect was already sufficiently robust.
My electrician had told me that I have a 250 amp service to the house with less than 150 being used, so I think I can swing a 100 amp circuit to the charger. I don't know the price, but also if I have it installed before the end of 2021, I will get 30% off the installation price as a tax credit. I don't think anyone knows if this credit will be extended in 2022.
 
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