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I was going to buy a Clipper creek unit. But the 16-20 week wait wasnt going to work for me. So I ordered a unit from Wattzilla. Went with the 48 Amp unit. I was going to hard wire it but when it arrived, it had a plug on the end of the cable. Ended up installing a 60 amp receptacle. Works just fine
 

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What EVs can pull higher than 48 amps when charging? I thought none of them did. Early Teslas did, but not new ones.

What’s the reason to install an 80 amp circuit at home?
An 80 Amp circuit is very large for a home. Most homes have 200 Amps total coming into the house. Older homes less. Unless you routinely need to charge in a time that is less than overnight a 50A circuit absolutely fine. And, remember the faster you charge the harder it is on the battery, so fast charging at home really buys you nearly nothing.
 

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An 80 Amp circuit is very large for a home. Most homes have 200 Amps total coming into the house. Older homes less. Unless you routinely need to charge in a time that is less than overnight a 50A circuit absolutely fine. And, remember the faster you charge the harder it is on the battery, so fast charging at home really buys you nearly nothing.
You can’t charge at Level 2 with more current than the vehicle requests. Both Tesla and ID.4 can pull 48 amps from the circuit and not any higher regardless of what the charger is capable of.

However, as many have pointed out, the newer vehicles will enable 80 amp charging. For a standard sub-100 kWh battery, charging at 48 amps or even 40 amps would fill the battery from near 0% to near 100% overnight, so the battery would be charged by the time you wake up.

However, what if you need to charge a 200 kWh battery (like in the new Hummer EV or in a CyberTruck)? If you are going to use a 48 amp charger (at 240 V), you will be charging at about 11 kW, which would take you something like 18 hours to charge the battery fully. An 80-amp charger would be charging at about 19 kW, which would charge the battery from 0% to 100% in under 11 hours.

No one actually charges from 0% to 100% at home, so we are talking about 8-9 hours to charge a 200 kWh battery on a 80 amp charger, whereas a 48 amp charger would take 15-16 hours or so, which is already problematic.

I will definitely get a quote for a 100-amp circuit to future proof it for an 80 amp charger if I ever need one.
 

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That's going to be one heck of a quote! o_O Most USA folks now have 200A service, but many still at 100A and your quote would be for a circuit handling half or all of that. So in addition to heavier EVSE-feed wire gauge and breakers likely heavier grid-entry wire and larger capacity entry panel, bordering on commercial application!!

Related: most of the homes in my 3-year old retiree-downsized development have 100A service. When I roughed-in for a 48/40A EVSE during construction that alone drove me to an interior 200A panel. Thankfully the line off the transformer to my current NEC exterior disconnect was already sufficiently robust.
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I will definitely get a quote for a 100-amp circuit to future proof it for an 80 amp charger if I ever need one.
 

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Seems to me the overall question relates to how efficient the cars are. If the expectation is that everybody drives the same amount they do now, but in a huge, boxy pickup truck, there will be a need for bigger charging capacity. But if people get efficient EVs and drive the same amount they do now, the daily charging need doesn't depend on whether the car has a 60 or a 100 or a 200 kWh battery.

Recent history suggests that people will buy huge, boxy pickup trucks and drive them even faster than they do now. :(
 

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That's going to be one heck of a quote! o_O Most USA folks now have 200A service, but many still at 100A and your quote would be for a circuit handling half or all of that. So in addition to heavier EVSE-feed wire gauge and breakers likely heavier grid-entry wire and larger capacity entry panel, bordering on commercial application!!

Related: most of the homes in my 3-year old retiree-downsized development have 100A service. When I roughed-in for a 48/40A EVSE during construction that alone drove me to an interior 200A panel. Thankfully the line off the transformer to my current NEC exterior disconnect was already sufficiently robust.
My electrician had told me that I have a 250 amp service to the house with less than 150 being used, so I think I can swing a 100 amp circuit to the charger. I don't know the price, but also if I have it installed before the end of 2021, I will get 30% off the installation price as a tax credit. I don't think anyone knows if this credit will be extended in 2022.
 

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Faster L2 home charging times seems like a bragging rights contest if you ask me
I'd say, if you have to put in a circuit for a charge point then put in the biggest cable you can justify. I got a 6 guage (I think) and have a 40amp breakers for a 30 amp service and going to 48 amps 5 years later with 50 amp breakers. Plan for the future. It's cheaper.
 

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Yep, I'm always amazed when I see USA statistics and re-realize there are more pickup trucks sold each year than anything else, and by a wide margin.

Yes, one should try to "future proof", to a degree. But I'm reminded that in my prior (much larger 300A) home, built in 2001, I personally installed miles of ethernet-coax-audio cable from every room/exterior camera/attic antennas and home-run to basement panel. It served me very well for 17 years but the latter years the world went to WiFi/Bluetooth so in one view of life I wasted a lot of money and effort. "Difficult to see the future; always in motion it is." -Yoda
[I did still run ethernet/coax to multiple rooms 2018 in present smaller home, as I still prefer from a shielded signal security perspective; and the 6-50 EVSE line to garage.]
Seems to me the overall question relates to how efficient the cars are. If the expectation is that everybody drives the same amount they do now, but in a huge, boxy pickup truck, there will be a need for bigger charging capacity. But if people get efficient EVs and drive the same amount they do now, the daily charging need doesn't depend on whether the car has a 60 or a 100 or a 200 kWh battery.

Recent history suggests that people will buy huge, boxy pickup trucks and drive them even faster than they do now. :(
My electrician had told me that I have a 250 amp service to the house with less than 150 being used, so I think I can swing a 100 amp circuit to the charger. I don't know the price, but also if I have it installed before the end of 2021, I will get 30% off the installation price as a tax credit. I don't think anyone knows if this credit will be extended in 2022.
 

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I'm in the same boat with cat 5 cable and pots telephone copper at the tail end of a way too long remodel.

At least if wireless car charging ever catches on, the need will remain for these EVSE circuits we're installing to power the charging pads.
 
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