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What’s the purpose of installing a juicebox or other EVSE aside from aesthetics? Genuinely curious as I’m planning to just get a 240v outlet installed and call it good.
I think I can offer some insight here as someone who already owns an EV.

The cable that comes with the car is your emergency cable that you want in the car at all times just in case you need to drive further than expected and need to charge. So it must always be stowed in the car.

If that is your only charge cable, every time you charge at home you have to unroll this cable and then neatly pack away the cable back into your car's storage compartment every time you leave the house. These cables are thick and would be a hassle to wrangle with every day if the cable is not tethered to a wall. The solution is an EVSE where the cable hangs on the EVSE or on some kind of hook on the wall, so leaving your house and returning home is simple and easy -- no hassle with uncoiling the cable or winding the cable back up and going on your way.

So while you could make it work with just the cable that comes with the car, life will be easier with one cable easily coiled to a wall and another cable that lives permanently neatly coiled up in a storage compartment in the car for just-in-case emergencies.
 

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What’s the purpose of installing a juicebox or other EVSE aside from aesthetics? Genuinely curious as I’m planning to just get a 240v outlet installed and call it good.
What are you going to plug into the 240V outlet? If you mean the adapter things folks use to make many of the supplied charge cords work on 240, that could work (usually 12A max, even at 240V, so just under 3 kW). Otherwise, the wall charge station beyond safety features (e.g. ground fault, and the EV cord is not live until plugged into the car), provides the needed plug for the car.

All of these (adapter one TBD) can work, so just do what is best for you. Here's a brief comparison:

OEM unit that comes with the car
1.4 kW - usually 12A max - Charge cord with the car 120 outlet (should be in good condition, over the years, many cases of outlets too hot, some browning or melting)
3 kW - same 12A max - adapters where the OEM 120V cord can actually be wired through an adapter for 240V (because so many are actually made to work internationally at the higher voltage).

3.8 kW - 16A - the oldest wall units from the Gen. 1 Chevy Volt days (2011 and later), e.g. Clipper Creek LCS-20, and some lower priced units that plug into 240V outlets.

7.6 kW - 32A - many EVs, especially PHEVs went to 32A, the station can plug into many 240V outlets, runs on a 40A circuit (many types available)

11 kW - 48A - several Tesla models can do 11kW, probably this is the current trend, VW included, hardwired only, runs on a 60A circuit (chargepoint, juicebox, more to follow for sure)

each one of these can be converted into "miles per hour" of charging, usually ranging from about 3 to 36. So, 5 hours at 3 mph (120V/12A) adds 15 miles. 5 hours at 36 mph (240V/48A) adds 180 miles (very rough estimates)
 

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The 11kW would make sense at this point in time and VAG does a good job at "future proofing", especially as it is in their future marketing best interest to do so.

Oh, and typo for me above in that I have a 220V/60A roughed in circuit. I was thinking "in-rush" coverage.
 

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My understanding has been that 6-2 Romex (NM and NMC) is only rated to 55 Amps so I don't think it should be used for a 48 Amp EVSE requiring a 60 Amp circuit. Instead, I've been planning to use 6-2 THHN MC (Metal Clad) with 90C capable temp rating that's suppose to handle up to 75 Amps if I decide to use a 48 or 50 Amp EVSE . Please feel free to correct me if this is wrong.
Thanks! I will do some more reading, but at first scan, I think you are correct. So, looks like I have that first run for other future projects. Other than embarrassing, it is easy enough to add another length of #4.

It looks like 60A breaker / #6 romex is possibly compliant, (60F at 50A, 75F at 65A), but on further thought, possibly would run on the too warm for me side at 48A. Also, I have a long run, 75', so resistive ohmic loss is a concern. The project continues!

(another possible complication is that the chargepoint terminal strip connector is #6 max (irony, because they have 70A and 80A setup options to get from 48A to 50A), so maybe a transition connection from #4 to #6 at the station, ah such fun!)
 

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My understanding has been that 6-2 Romex (NM and NMC) is only rated to 55 Amps so I don't think it should be used for a 48 Amp EVSE requiring a 60 Amp circuit. Instead, I've been planning to use 6-2 THHN MC (Metal Clad) with 90C capable temp rating that's suppose to handle up to 75 Amps if I decide to use a 48 or 50 Amp EVSE . Please feel free to correct me if this is wrong.
The electricians at Mike Holt's forum agree with you, normally it is fine to round up #6 to a 60A breaker, however, continuous load seems to over rule the NEC round up rule. So, it's THHN (probably #6 wires in conduit), or I'm leaning towards just going to #4 wires in conduit because of my long run and I'd like the cable to run a little cooler.

hmm, Or, I could just leave it as, change to a 50A breaker, and derate in the chargepoint flex to 40A, which probably makes the most sense for now.

 

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Thanks for checking Emtonsti! I appreciate the help. I'm certainly trying to learn as much as I can since I'm planning to run the line myself as well.
Funny, part of me really wants to rework the installation to get to 48A, but every time I add up all of the parts, I keep hitting $500+, 80 foot - 4AWG wire x 2, 8AWG ground, 6AWG short pig tails x 2, 4AWG to 6AWG coupler (chargepoint terminal is #6 max), flex conduit to run up the wall and over the garage door, brackets for the conduit, conduit fittings, 70A double breaker ...

OTOH, to be NEC compliant with my 6AWG NMB romex "mistake" (cost $110), all I need to do is to buy a $10 double 50A breaker. So, I get 40A charging, which honestly, I know is plenty good enough for my situation. I guess I will just call it for now, but it feels very frustrating how difficult the incremental improvement is from 40A to 48A!

BTW: (for the 6-2 MC you mentioned, which should be fine too) - I have not used them, but many posts suggest this is a good source: 6/2 Copper MC Cable w/ Ground
 

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There's a tax credit for installing the home charging station in 2020 even tho' the vehicle delivery is not until 2021? Federal or State (or both)? TIA

Great. Thanks! 'll check them out. Although my ID.4 won't be delivered until next year I'm planning to do EVSE install this year just to be sure to get the 30% tax credit. I'm guessing that the credit will be extended again after this year, but I figure why chance it.
...
 

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6-2 MC is still possible. A warm cable run is okay, as long as not hot, but that heat is loss and voltage drop. I should probably just do the spreadsheet and look at the numbers, my run from the box across my basement is 75ft plus, more length, more loss, more voltage drop. Your point is very well taken, in the sense that even chargepoint only provides connections for up to #6AWG max. Thank you so much for your original post about NMB, I bet a lot of electricians will get this wrong too. I did some ac power work at the edge of my work assignments and had some technician time at the before my EE career, both were some years back and I do not routinely work with the code.

It is easy to get silly about loss and warm. For example, the wall stations routinely use a gauge of wire one lower for the cord to the car (which usually does run warm) because it is out in free air (some even say uncoil the cord, even if you only need a few feet, for this reason. It's just algebra, maybe later I'll work the numbers and see what the loss would be if I just go 6-2 MC, that is certainly the lowest cost code compliant solution. THHN wires in conduit would be okay too, but adds the cost of conduit, where some states do not require conduit.

I doubt 4AWG is much in the way of future proof, because already some EV stations to 70A can require or #2AWG or larger diameter for longer runs. If this trend continues, I should probably just ask National Grid if they could run another service line directly to my garage!

Yea, it took me a week to find a SqD 60A double (HOM) too. In researching 70A double SqD HOM, prices range from $29 at some kind of Home Depot professional (not really sure what this site is, but it let me create an account) to well over $100 on eBay. Both Lowes and Home Depot said it was a COVID related factory issue, on the way to some resolution.
 

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There's a tax credit for installing the home charging station in 2020 even tho' the vehicle delivery is not until 2021? Federal or State (or both)? TIA
As I read the wording for the tax credit for home charging stations here in Maine is that you had to have a vehicle to go with the charging station in order to get the credit. I would love to be wrong, please correct me if I am.
 

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I guess 2021 it will be for my tax purposes and as 2020 has been pretty much a write-off year (pun intended) I would hope EV credits would be extended, even tho' I know that hope is not a strategy. ;)
 

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... What's the reason not to just go with a 6-2 MC line? ...
Okay, someone check my numbers (quick estimate of voltage drop and loss for an 80' run). It certainly looks like 6-2 MC does make sense, as a least expensive solution which is still code compliant (fits in the chargepoint flex terminals too).
710
 

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More advice needed, I need a portable EVSE that I could plug into 14-50 Nema plugs at campgrounds while I travel. Would a juicebox works in that case? Also do the chargers protect the cars from overloads in the case of a wonky campground outlet? Thanks!
 

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... 70A breaker ...
Unless there is a Tesla S, or other EV that can accept 50A, just use a 60A breaker for 48A. I was looking at 70A breakers to go with #4, but even then, for EVs a lot of folks downsize the breaker to just what is needed for the EVSE (i.e. 125% of EVSE current) and no more, just a little added safety margin with no nuisance trips by the 80%rule.
 

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I just tried looking up Maine's charging station tax credit to see how Maine would have worded their law, but I couldn't find it. Do you have a link? I'm just curious even though I don't live in Maine. Thanks.
I can't find it doing a quick search. I am heading out now and will go thru my browser history tonight when I get home.
 

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I agree, but other than the cost difference is there a downside to go with the 70 A breaker...to allow for some future proofing?
Cost - about $10 for a SQD double 60A HOM type, Safety, 48A continuous is some pretty serious continuous 11 kW power for a home; even if 70A breaker is allowed, consider going with the lowest 125% rated breaker.

(just ordered 100' 6/2 Copper MC Cable w/ Ground, $206 shipped with coupon code EMAIL5)
 

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More advice needed, I need a portable EVSE that I could plug into 14-50 Nema plugs at campgrounds while I travel. Would a juicebox works in that case? Also do the chargers protect the cars from overloads in the case of a wonky campground outlet? Thanks!
There are lot of good portable solutions, like the ClipperCreek related Amazinge products (still a little pricey, but very reliable and high quality). Also, if you don't need the faster charging, if the VW charger is suitable for use with a 240 Vac adapter (TBD), a lot of other EV and PHEV owners just use the OEM EVSE charge cord with an adapter at RV parks.
 

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Safety, 48A continuous is some pretty serious continuous 11 kW power for a home; even if 70A breaker is allowed, consider going with the lowest 125% rated breaker.
Ok, you convinced me. The cost delta was only $25 for the 70A after tax credit, but it does make me nervous. I'll follow your lead. Thanks.
 

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I pulled the trigger and got the ChargePoint unit (in just 2-days via Amazon!). Although very doable installation myself (ol' EE and an excellent Apple/Nest-like YouTube available, linked) I'm having my local electrician do so mostly for insurance risk-averse purposes. Doing it now to assure the US Fed Tax Form 8911 is still viable.
The already roughed in cable is more than adequate for the charger's full 48A charge capacity and will install a 50A GFCI breaker (no 'locked rotor' electrical inertia in this case so a 2A buffer is fine).
Going to do the hardwired installation as disconnection/replacement is not that much work if needed and hardwired is required per ChargePoint to attain 48A.

 
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