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Registered User
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

If I charge VW ID4 with the default cable in my garage, how fast does it to get fully charged? Do I need to install a 240v charging station? Thanks!
 

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Registered User
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217 Posts
How many miles do you drive a day? You only need to replenish what you used in the day.
 

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ID.4 FE GW
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506 Posts
The usable capacity of the VW ID.4 battery pack is 77 kWh.
The on-board charger can charge at 11 kW or lower power.
If you installed a 240V, 50 A circuit (about the highest current circuit installed in homes), it would supply 40A with a 20% safety overload factor). If you buy a 240V, 40A EVSE (the home power box that goes between the outlet / circuit and the car, it could charge at 9.6 kW. Assuming 10% loss in efficiency, that would charge the car in 8.8 hours.

You may be able to use an existing 240A circuit (like for a dryer) which could save some money, but it might charge more slowly (less current) and you would still need to buy a 30A EVSE.

Realistically, you would never charge from absolutely empty to absolutely full. It is best to not charge more than 80% full, and you will probably never deplete the battery to fully empty.

There is some more info about ID.4 charging here:

It looks like the ID.4 comes with a Level 1 (120V), low power EVSE cable that adds about 3 mi of EPA range per hour charged.
 

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Happy owner of a blue ID.4 FE
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With that mileage it’s easy to recharge your car on any 240V charger in a few short hours, regardless of circuit or choice of box.
Full battery every morning without even trying, you’ll love it!
 

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Proud FE owner
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It's less about charging than preconditioning the cabin, for comfort, and battery to optimize your range. You'll want a convenient plug-in option, whether it be your provided cable or a Level 2 and wall box.
 

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ID.4 FE GW
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It's less about charging than preconditioning the cabin, for comfort, and battery to optimize your range. You'll want a convenient plug-in option, whether it be your provided cable or a Level 2 and wall box.
What? I don't understand that.

Yes, the car's software will balance the charging between the battery cells when charging. That primarily optimizes longevity, but I guess that impacts range too.

Or are you talking about running the battery and cabin heater before you get in and drive? I haven't ever done that in my car, but it may make sense in a cold climate. The supplied Level 1 EVSE ( aka "charge cord") will be totally inadequate for that - my current car draws 7.4 kW for that when I tried it as an experiment, and I suspect that the ID.4 will draw that much or more power.
 

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ID.4 Pro S Gradient AWD pre-ordered 9/23/2020
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What? I don't understand that.

Yes, the car's software will balance the charging between the battery cells when charging. That primarily optimizes longevity, but I guess that impacts range too.

Or are you talking about running the battery and cabin heater before you get in and drive? I haven't ever done that in my car, but it may make sense in a cold climate. The supplied Level 1 EVSE ( aka "charge cord") will be totally inadequate for that - my current car draws 7.4 kW for that when I tried it as an experiment, and I suspect that the ID.4 will draw that much or more power.
ErickF is likely talking about preconditioning from the app and/or a pre-scheduled departure time. Doing so will precondition the cabin and (I think) battery. For most folks, it's best to precondition while the vehicle is plugged into an active charging source, whether that be L1 or L2. That way, you're pulling power from the electrical grid to precondition the cabin/battery, and not the battery. On that note, preconditioning while plugged into L1 likely will still pull some power from the battery, since L1 can only deliver so much energy to the vehicle.

My recommendation for at-home charging is to get the highest capacity L2 EVSE you can comfortably afford. It's not necessarily about the ID.4 itself, but about the future. You don't want to pay a licensed electrician good money to install a 32-amp L2 EVSE (requires 40-amp 240v circuit) in your home, and then a few years down the line, after you're hooked on EV's and you get another/a new one, and you want or need an L2 EVSE that can deliver more power to the new car (e.g., 9 kW or 11 kW, or higher). I say this because putting in an L2 EVSE that's capable of delivering more energy to the EV likely requires different wiring, and depending, a different plug or hardwire connection. That is to say, you should future-proof as mush as is reasonably possible. The cost difference between a 32-amp L2 EVSE, a 40-amp L2 EVSE, and a 48-amp L2 EVSE (the last of which is capable of feeding the ID.4's 11 kW onboard charger to the max) is generally not much. However, they require different circuits (40-amp, 50-amp, and 60-amp, respectively), different minimum wire gauges for the electrical run, and different connections (the former two can be plugged in, generally into a NEMA 14-50 outlet, and the latter must be hardwired to your panel).

At-home charging with an L1 EVSE (which is what the ID.4 comes with in the U.S.) is slowwwww and will only net you about 3 miles for every hour of charging. This is likely sufficient for overnight charging for most folks' work commutes, but if you ever get into a situation where you only have a couple/few hours to charge up, then you're basically SOL and will either have to deal with less available range or hit up a public charger (whether that's L2 or DCFC). Also, it's important to note that not all regular 120v circuits and/or outlets in your home can deal with long periods of EV charging. Generally, folks who need to utilize L1 for long periods of charging will change the outlets to heavy duty outlets. Otherwise, there are plenty of cases of melted outlets and such. Long periods of charging generate a lot of heat in the 120v wires and outlets.
 
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