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Just got my electric bill for the month of May, 2021. My detailed bill showed the five highest usage days. My Pulsar Plus EVSE keeps a detailed record of charging sessions so I am able to quickly see what days I have charged, for how long and the amount, based on CPS Energy's $.06 kw rate. The five highest days coincided with ID.4 charging and cost approximately $30. The cost of gasoline in my previous 2017 Malibu Hybrid averaging 41 mpg would have been about $122 for the same 2,000 miles I drove. $30 of electricity is quite the savings.

I also want to editorialize here: I feel as though we, the early ID.4 owners, have been used as beta testers for an unfinished project. There is so much good with this new vehicle yet so much unfinished or broken. This is not just a get behind the wheel and drive off model.
 

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The electrical rates in California are so much higher. It is actually more pensive to drive a aEV then a good fuel efficient car even at these high gas rates. And in the summer when you are paying .40 per kw it is better to drive a 1970 s model gas guzzler. It’s the dirty little secret that you do not save money with electric vehicles.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition
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No, it's not (at least not yet). But as someone who tries to take a positive perspective I get a bit of pageantry out of the experience. It's I imagine a very wee bit like a 60's Mercury space launch .... without all the switches. ;)
...

I also want to editorialize here: I feel as though we, the early ID.4 owners, have been used as beta testers for an unfinished project. There is so much good with this new vehicle yet so much unfinished or broken. This is not just a get behind the wheel and drive off model.
 

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It's 9 cents where I'm at. I did some math and the best case is $3k of saving in 5 years offset by $1k to $2k of one off costs such as wall charger.

(Not counting free EA charging)
 

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Just got my electric bill for the month of May, 2021. My detailed bill showed the five highest usage days. My Pulsar Plus EVSE keeps a detailed record of charging sessions so I am able to quickly see what days I have charged, for how long and the amount, based on CPS Energy's $.06 kw rate. The five highest days coincided with ID.4 charging and cost approximately $30. The cost of gasoline in my previous 2017 Malibu Hybrid averaging 41 mpg would have been about $122 for the same 2,000 miles I drove. $30 of electricity is quite the savings.

I also want to editorialize here: I feel as though we, the early ID.4 owners, have been used as beta testers for an unfinished project. There is so much good with this new vehicle yet so much unfinished or broken. This is not just a get behind the wheel and drive off model.
Your Beta comment is certainly spot on.
 

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ID.4 RWD Pro S Dusk Blue
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It's 9 cents where I'm at. I did some math and the best case is $3k of saving in 5 years offset by $1k to $2k of one off costs such as wall charger.

(Not counting free EA charging)
For me, with the TOU plan I have, and accounting for the backend provider's extra charge (not the provider I buy from, but the one that actually provides the electricity where I am at), my rate at night is $0.077/kWh, and based on my math compared to my previous car (Fusion 24mpg) I am saving ~1.2K/year on fuel costs (and that is only accounting for last year's gas prices, it will be even more savings with the current prices).

Plus I don't have to do the other maintenance that I had to do with my previous car (oil changes, transmission flush, radiator flush [maybe still this one, not sure], spark plug replacement, engine tune-up, etc), so those cost savings are also a factor.

Also, my EVSE (WB Pulsar Plus) was only $600, and the cost of the 50A NEMA plug install was only $150, for a total of $750 to charge my car at home. That will be made up in less than 8 months of fuel savings.

Hopefully I am able to keep this car for 10 years.
 

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Flip side of the coin is likely more expensive tires. Level 2 installation is also likely to eat up a lot of the savings. I haven’t done it so far but costs that I know of. First the EVSE was $650, second just rewiring from the power company pedestal to my house is $600. Second does the current breaker box have to be replaced to meet current regulations? Third will I have to replace all of the existing but old breakers to meet current regulations ( 1972 house) ? Fourth install a new 50 amp breaker. Fifth run about 60 feet of wire from the back left of my house to the front right where the driveway is.
 

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Flip side of the coin is likely more expensive tires. Level 2 installation is also likely to eat up a lot of the savings. I haven’t done it so far but costs that I know of. First the EVSE was $650, second just rewiring from the power company pedestal to my house is $600. Second does the current breaker box have to be replaced to meet current regulations? Third will I have to replace all of the existing but old breakers to meet current regulations ( 1972 house) ? Fourth install a new 50 amp breaker. Fifth run about 60 feet of wire from the back left of my house to the front right where the driveway is.
Don’t forget - the federal gov’t will fund 30% of those costs (up to $1000) - that’ll help in your calculations.
 

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Don’t forget - the federal gov’t will fund 30% of those costs (up to $1000) - that’ll help in your calculations.
Don’t forget the astronomical increase in building material costs an building labor costs within the past year.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition Blue (acquired 4/20/2021)
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Don’t forget the astronomical increase in building material costs an building labor costs within the past year.
You’ll need all the variable in your calculation…. 🧮. Bought/installed my ESVE for ~$500 (and an hour of my labor), so I guess it really depends on each person’s specific scenario. But having all the factors will definitely help come to the real $.
 

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Maybe its naive, but I'm thinking that a L2 EVSE install (or at least the wiring and plug) in a garage will increase the home value a touch. If EVs really do become a significant market share, it would be added value for the buyer if they didnt have to go through the hassle and costs of installing a L2 EVSE when moving into their new home. Obviously these gains are speculative and cant be realized until selling the home, but it could offset the cost eventually while you amortize it through daily use :).
 

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I figured it couldn't hurt resale. At the least would show someone who was forward looking and willing to add value to their home, which might be attractive qualities to buyers.
Maybe its naive, but I'm thinking that a L2 EVSE install (or at least the wiring and plug) in a garage will increase the home value a touch. If EVs really do become a significant market share, it would be added value for the buyer if they didnt have to go through the hassle and costs of installing a L2 EVSE when moving into their new home. Obviously these gains are speculative and cant be realized until selling the home, but it could offset the cost eventually while you amortize it through daily use :).
 

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It doesn't hurt it but it doesn't increase the value at all. Similarly with solar panels only there you have to also convince the appraiser of their value so it tends to work against the seller. We would have been better off stripping our last home of all the smart things before selling for all the good it did and the ensuing frustration afterwards. Do it for yourself not for any prospective future owners. I was reading comments on another board about solar installs because my wife and I are in the process of doing it all again and someone pointed out they buy dividend stock from the electric provider in LA and that paid their electric bill with excess. I ran the numbers and that person was right and with CA moving to NEM 3.0 it's getting increasingly difficult to break even let alone benefit from rooftop solar. They effectively killed rooftop solar in AZ already.

That said, in this current market you just need four sticks and a stone and you'll have a caravan of willing bidders.
 

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I did a lot of whole house audio, security, and significant network integration on my prior home and yes, it has caused me as well to have to answer a lot of technical questions since sale (even tho' I left very good homemade 'tech manuals' in addition to those that came with the gear). So even tho' they were initially impressed with same ....
But I still think it doesn't hurt resale to have an EVSE. "Hey honey, did you see they had a car charger." ;)
It doesn't hurt it but it doesn't increase the value at all. Similarly with solar panels only there you have to also convince the appraiser of their value so it tends to work against the seller. We would have been better off stripping our last home of all the smart things before selling for all the good it did and the ensuing frustration afterwards. Do it for yourself not for any prospective future owners. I was reading comments on another board about solar installs because my wife and I are in the process of doing it all again and someone pointed out they buy dividend stock from the electric provider in LA and that paid their electric bill with excess. I ran the numbers and that person was right and with CA moving to NEM 3.0 it's getting increasingly difficult to break even let alone benefit from rooftop solar. They effectively killed rooftop solar in AZ already.

That said, in this current market you just need four sticks and a stone and you'll have a caravan of willing bidders.
 

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Glacier White/Lunar Grey 1st Edition with 19" Wheels
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I did a lot of whole house audio, security, and significant network integration on my prior home and yes, it has caused me as well to have to answer a lot of technical questions since sale (even tho' I left very good homemade 'tech manuals' in addition to those that came with the gear). So even tho' they were initially impressed with same ....
But I still think it doesn't hurt resale to have an EVSE. "Hey honey, did you see they had a car charger." ;)
Yea, I mean, we are talking about approximately $1-2k to buy a L2 EVSE and get it installed. Just like many home improvement projects, you don't typically expect >=100% ROI. So say a conservative estimate of 50% ROI, that would only be a $500-$1000 boost in home value. This might not be noticeable since you don't itemize your home value to the public when you sell it. Nonetheless, it can be a minor selling point that contributes to the overall asking price you set, which is hopefully higher than what you bought it for :). With that being said, my chargepoint is plugged in, so I will take it with me when I sell the house...unless the buyers make me an offer to include it.
 

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It doesn't hurt it but it doesn't increase the value at all. Similarly with solar panels only there you have to also convince the appraiser of their value so it tends to work against the seller. We would have been better off stripping our last home of all the smart things before selling for all the good it did and the ensuing frustration afterwards. Do it for yourself not for any prospective future owners. I was reading comments on another board about solar installs because my wife and I are in the process of doing it all again and someone pointed out they buy dividend stock from the electric provider in LA and that paid their electric bill with excess. I ran the numbers and that person was right and with CA moving to NEM 3.0 it's getting increasingly difficult to break even let alone benefit from rooftop solar. They effectively killed rooftop solar in AZ already.

That said, in this current market you just need four sticks and a stone and you'll have a caravan of willing bidders.
I'm not saying you'll get rich installing EVSEs in garages or that you will even recoup your investment in a home sale. But no increase in value at all? Hard to say it doesn't increase value at all since value is largely subjective. Ultimately, a house is worth what someone is willing to pay for it. If someone with an EV sees a house in a hot market, they might value one with a L2 EVSE already installed more than the house down the street without. This could lead to a more aggressive bid to secure the property than you might not have received otherwise. Sure, they could buy the house without and get one installed, but why go through the trouble when your house has already taken care of it for them? Minor consideration yes, but the buyer's pro/cons list dictates their offer, so who really knows?
 

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Even remodeling a home doesn't increase the value of a home during a real estate transaction. A particular feature can drive the sale but that's not the same as impacting (or increasing) value. Values is driven by comparable sales. Someone might bid on a house because they like the fact it has an EVSE installed but they are going to bid according to the current market conditions and pay, ultimately, what the appraiser and bank conclude the market value actually is.

Also, in order to increase value the property would have to sell for more than it cost to install whatever feature is being touted as the value add. Sellers of these kinds of systems, EVSEs, solar power, security, etc. pump their resale potential but the harsh reality is that they become a hindrance in the sale. Your hypothetical buyer who owns an EV already has an EVSE. If they aren't bringing it along, they already know what it costs to install one--and when they do install one they are going to buy whatever the newest tech is (same logic with all the other hi-tech "value" adds). Unless it's permanently installed it's not even a fixture that comes with the property anyway but that's a minor point.

While there is an appraiser section for energy updates, EVSEs wouldn't generally fit into that category and any positive adjustments would be completely outpaced by what appraisers call, "functional obsolescence." Wife and I currently own a handful of rentals in San Diego area and we've gone through this process when we remodeled our last primary home and know how long the permitting process is in the area (months). So while I think people asking on the forums were planning on using licensed electricians for their EVSE installs, I doubt many of them went through a permitting process. It's not a big deal in SoCal--if you exclude non-permitted work you're going to exclude nearly every property for sale--but it does mean you're going to have a difficult time asking for anything regarding the install. As soon as you try to list it as a feature, a savvy agent is going to push back with you either include for free or rip it out at your own cost.

Of course, everything I'm saying is regarding a normal market. In the past year's market many homes are going under contract without the buyer even seeing inside and closing without an inspection (and then paying cash over appraised value). If you're approaching this discussion from a value perspective, you'll get that $500 dollars much easier by spending $20 bucks on a gallon of paint. If I was your buyer I certainly agree I would notice and appreciate a permanently installed EVSE. It would tell me a little something about what kind of owner you were. I would also be more likely to bid on your house if an exact match down the road was missing the EVSE all other variables being equal. That said, I wouldn't pay you more for the house because of it and I haven't met or heard of a buyer doing it in practice, either. It could come in handy during negotiations (I noticed that old water heater and would like a seller's credit; how about we convey the EVSE to you instead?).

People do this with cars, too. They add up all the maintenance and aftermarket additions and come up with a figure based on those factors rather than what other similar vehicles with same mileage are selling for and their car sits around waiting for the mythical buyer who is going to appreciate all of their personalized touches that created value and joy for the owner. If you happen to come across a buyer who buys into the notion that you've added value with your modifications (to home or vehicle) fantastic! My advice, however, is do your upgrades for you not the next owner.
 
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