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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Discussion on the ID.4's current battery pack made by LG. I recently purchased a Pro S and after seeing transportation evolved talk about another Chevy Bolt fired it's got me worried about the LG battery pack in the ID.4.
 

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I have not heard of any ID.4 fires. Don't worry, be happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have not heard of any ID.4 fires. Don't worry, be happy.
I'm comfortable with my car. Doesn't mean I won't raise some points of concern. Especially since Chevy has been reluctant to replace the batteries. This is something Volkswagen should address to quell concerns by the average consumer.
 

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I'm comfortable with my car. Doesn't mean I won't raise some points of concern. Especially since Chevy has been reluctant to replace the batteries. This is something Volkswagen should address to quell concerns by the average consumer.
Same. I had a Kona before - that had an issue similar to the Bolt. As best as anyone can tell, and as best as anyone would admit, the problem was a manufacturing defect in one specific plant in China, which has since been corrected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Same. I had a Kona before - that had an issue similar to the Bolt. As best as anyone can tell, and as best as anyone would admit, the problem was a manufacturing defect in one specific plant in China, which has since been corrected.
That's the biggest point I'm trying to figure out. I had a Chevy bolt premier before I traded it in. Would be nice if they would state what's the issues causing vehicles to cash fire.
 

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For the Kona, it was claimed to be a folded anode tab.


We were waiting for Hyundai to talk about the LG Energy Solution (LGES) statement on Kona Electric fires for a while, but now InsideEVs has an official explanation for them. According to Hyundai, it was indeed a folded anode tab in the batteries that caused the fires. Remember that these folded anode tabs could also be on the Chevrolet Bolt EV, which uses LG Energy Solution cells and also experienced fires recently.
 

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Just for a fact even Tesla is using LG cells for EU market....How some EV companies work closely and how they follow battery manufacturers guidelines are different between each and every EV maker. If someone is worried about this type of thing.....reports do showh higher rate of ICE cars getting on fire than EV in general. And I'm quite positive on government agencies in all different countries not just US would stop EV maker from producing any EV if there is enough evidence for safety of end user.
 

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As a point of reference, my neighborhood is chock full of EVs — lots of Tesla, over a dozen i3s, Priuses and Leafs all over, quite a few Bolts and Volts, and a sprinkling of Konas, Niros, and even a ID.4 or two.

I'm not familiar with a single one catching on fire. And I'm pretty sure if it happened, I'd be reading about it on Nextdoor.

That's not to say the risk isn't there, but it certainly isn't any more of a concern than a kitchen fire (probably less so, actually!) or a backyard propane grill fireball incident.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just for a fact even Tesla is using LG cells for EU market....How some EV companies work closely and how they follow battery manufacturers guidelines are different between each and every EV maker. If someone is worried about this type of thing.....reports do showh higher rate of ICE cars getting on fire than EV in general. And I'm quite positive on government agencies in all different countries not just US would stop EV maker from producing any EV if there is enough evidence for safety of end user.
I don't think we have enough data to make that calculation on eve fires vs ICE.
As a point of reference, my neighborhood is chock full of EVs — lots of Tesla, over a dozen i3s, Priuses and Leafs all over, quite a few Bolts and Volts, and a sprinkling of Konas, Niros, and even a ID.4 or two.

I'm not familiar with a single one catching on fire. And I'm pretty sure if it happened, I'd be reading about it on Nextdoor.

That's not to say the risk isn't there, but it certainly isn't any more of a concern than a kitchen fire (probably less so, actually!) or a backyard propane grill fireball incident.
I don't there's enough Eves to make that calculation. There's close to a billion vehicles in the world that run a gas. Eves are no where near as available. So the data is going to favored eves vs Gas. I believe we need to wait until there's way way more eves before we can confirm that there is less fires then gas vehicles. Just my opinion
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

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I've responded to a gasoline fire in a parking lot at work (no collision) , a co-worker long ago watched her car combust in a shopping mall parking lot (no collision), I watched a Bronco on the street spit fuel (presumably) and shoot an under hood flame (didn't stick around to watch what unfolded), and I personally blew up a canister vac while sucking debris from a gas fume filled tank. I also presume most of the cars or charred remains neatly parked on the shoulder of the freeways on a regular basis weren't wrecks, but lit up while traveling.

All it takes is a steady dripping of fuel onto a hot manifold.

So no, an ICE vehicle doesn't need to be wrecked to burn.
 

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In 2014 when i was living back in my country Germany....my brand new 2014 X5 BMW after only 4 days of ownership burst in flame seating in front of my house.....but that is normal no media was involved in because it happens....When some EV goes in flames it is all around the media...
So relax people and enjoy your life and if it happens there is insurance and firefighters to resolve issues
 

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I hung one of these in my garage to sleep a bit easier. Burning cars is nothing new, but after watching a neighbor's detached garage burn to the ground a couple of years ago (likely an ICE car, but I didn't nose in to find out) I figured a trip up the ladder to install a smoke detector was worth the effort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've responded to a gasoline fire in a parking lot at work (no collision) , a co-worker long ago watched her car combust in a shopping mall parking lot (no collision), I watched a Bronco on the street spit fuel (presumably) and shoot an under hood flame (didn't stick around to watch what unfolded), and I personally blew up a canister vac while sucking debris from a gas fume filled tank. I also presume most of the cars or charred remains neatly parked on the shoulder of the freeways on a regular basis weren't wrecks, but lit up while traveling.

All it takes is a steady dripping of fuel onto a hot manifold.

So no, an ICE vehicle doesn't need to be wrecked to burn.
I didn't say it only happened during a accident. Or since you're trying to sound fancy, during a collision. Yeah if you can manage to lite the gasoline it will catch on fire. I've seen vehicle cash on fire. Luckily gasoline is a lot easier to put out then a battery fire. Plus I'm a bigger fan of diesel since it takes a lot more lite then gas and is more energy dense. All I'm going to say is I can leave a gallon of gasoline in a properly stored container and so long as no outside force effects it Im not worry about it liteing up. The battery with coolant lines and actively monitor by the computer no so much. Plus this is a discussion on finding out if Volkswagen made sure LG didn't screw up the battery like in the Chevy bolt or Kona EV. I love my ID.4 and being open about it's strengths and weaknesses is the best way to improve it so more people flock to it and many other evs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I hung one of these in my garage to sleep a bit easier. Burning cars is nothing new, but after watching a neighbor's detached garage burn to the ground a couple of years ago (likely an ICE car, but I didn't nose in to find out) I figured a trip up the ladder to install a smoke detector was worth the effort.
Not going to lie I should probably have one in there. Not because I'm worried about my car catching fire but I've been in many house and it doesn't seem common for fire alarms to be in the garage. But I also want to purchase a good fire extinguisher.
 

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It doesn't state what causes the fire. I'd be comfortable to assume it's during a accident that catches a ICE vehicle on fire. so far I've seen eves as the only one that catches fire not involving a accident.

I didn't say it only happened during a accident. Or since you're trying to sound fancy, during a collision. Yeah if you can manage to lite the gasoline it will catch on fire. I've seen vehicle cash on fire. Luckily gasoline is a lot easier to put out then a battery fire. Plus I'm a bigger fan of diesel since it takes a lot more lite then gas and is more energy dense. All I'm going to say is I can leave a gallon of gasoline in a properly stored container and so long as no outside force effects it Im not worry about it liteing up. The battery with coolant lines and actively monitor by the computer no so much. Plus this is a discussion on finding out if Volkswagen made sure LG didn't screw up the battery like in the Chevy bolt or Kona EV. I love my ID.4 and being open about it's strengths and weaknesses is the best way to improve it so more people flock to it and many other evs.
Sorry to confuse you with fancy words.

You started this thread saying VW should make a statement about EV battery fires happening to another brand of cars.

That would be an insane marketing strategy. "The 2021 ID.4 -- It Probably Won't Catch Fire."

Then you said there's not enough data to indicate EVs don't burn disproportionately to internal combustion.

Then you said that, yeah, ok ICE vehicle burn but mainly they have to be in a wreck (not too fancy, eh?).

Then you said that well at least burning gasoline is easy to put out, but you like diesel better.

...but batteries with coolant lines concern you.

And now you want to get back on topic?

How's this? VW shouldn't feel compelled to make a statement about battery fires until they have a problem with battery fires.
 

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I hung one of these in my garage to sleep a bit easier. Burning cars is nothing new, but after watching a neighbor's detached garage burn to the ground a couple of years ago (likely an ICE car, but I didn't nose in to find out) I figured a trip up the ladder to install a smoke detector was worth the effort.
I have a garage detector as well. Rather than the unit you've linked to, I have a similar unit that does a wireless interconnect with the other 5 detectors in my house. I think that's especially useful in the garage, since it's very possible I won't hear the alarm from my bedroom if it only sounds in the garage.
 

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I believe the Chevy Bolt and Hyundai Kona both used LG cells with chemistry 622. As mentioned before, there appears to be a manufacturing defect at the core of the Kona problems. Unclear on Chevy Bolt cell. Chevy has switched from 622 to 712 chemistry.

VW ID.4 uses LG pouch cells with 712 chemistry. So different cells, different chemistry than those discussed for "fires" : Volkswagen MEB details - 🔋PushEVs
 
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