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2021 VW ID.4 Pro (Moonstone Gray)
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Ars Technica has a new write-up about a likely cause of the LG cell failures on the Bolt that's interesting. Misaligned factory robot may have sparked Chevy Bolt battery fires It looks like it has a lot of do with the way the pouch geometry is assembled during automated production, so I'd expect that the ID-series might not have the same kind of issues.
 

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2021 VW iD4 1st Edition Glacier White
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I think 2020 Bolt/Kona use LGX E66A cells, which is the same format used by Taycan. VW iD3/4 use LGX E78, which is also used by newer Renault Zoe models. These cells are larger and more appropriate for simple shape battery packs. LG also has E71 which is used by Mach-e and has the same size as Bolt/Kona but different chemistry.
 

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I also read some article claiming Chevy/Kona cell-to-pouch architecture of the battery pack has something to do with the fire risk. VW has cells confined in individual modules, so there could be better protection from a short circuit in VW pack.

Edit: basically pouch cells go through volume change when charging/discharging. The cells should be confined to minimize movement when this volume change happens. The article claimed Bolt/Kona cells do not have proper confinement or compression pads to avoid cell movement and short circuit potential.
 

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As someone who may be getting out of a 2019 Hyundai Kona with a fried battery, and who is interested in the ID4, since the ID4 also has a battery made by LG Chem, how do we know that the ID4 won't end up with the same recall issue as the Kona and the Bolt? I'm not really concerned about the fire issue, but gun shy that the LG Chem battery could turn out to have similar issues—afterall, there are probably less ID4s on the road than Bolts and Konas and it took a couple of years to have the issue show up.

We are in a situation, where we're awaiting a buyback offer (on a lease) and because of the very long delay with our car (no car since May 10th), Hyundai is also offering use some money if we keep the car with a new battery. Since we only have 1 year left on our lease, we are torn by which offer to take since there may be many more new ID4s and EVs on the market in a year and at the moment it's hard to get the exact ID4 we want now.

Thoughts?
 

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2021 VW iD4 1st Edition Glacier White
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As someone who may be getting out of a 2019 Hyundai Kona with a fried battery, and who is interested in the ID4, since the ID4 also has a battery made by LG Chem, how do we know that the ID4 won't end up with the same recall issue as the Kona and the Bolt? I'm not really concerned about the fire issue, but gun shy that the LG Chem battery could turn out to have similar issues—afterall, there are probably less ID4s on the road than Bolts and Konas and it took a couple of years to have the issue show up.

We are in a situation, where we're awaiting a buyback offer (on a lease) and because of the very long delay with our car (no car since May 10th), Hyundai is also offering use some money if we keep the car with a new battery. Since we only have 1 year left on our lease, we are torn by which offer to take since there may be many more new ID4s and EVs on the market in a year and at the moment it's hard to get the exact ID4 we want now.

Thoughts?
There is more to it than LG Chem battery cells. There are many other models that use LG cells, some of them have been in market for 5 years, Renault Zoe for example (also i-Pace, Audi e-Tron). I think Bolt and Kona pack has a different design flaw that increases the likelihood of battery fires.
 

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VW ID.4 1st (picked up 3/19/21).
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There is more to it than LG Chem battery cells. There are many other models that use LG cells, some of them have been in market for 5 years, Renault Zoe for example (also i-Pace, Audi e-Tron). I think Bolt and Kona pack has a different design flaw that increases the likelihood of battery fires.
Kona reportedly had a folded anode. The Bolt supposedly had a "torn anode tab" and a "folded separator".

It is really hard to know what to make of it - LG doesn't say much at all, and they probably don't want to.
 

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2021 VW iD4 1st Edition Glacier White
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I think we are still in early ages of BEVs. Reliability and safety will improve significantly in a few years. I was in Hawaii recently and became interested in history of flights to Hawaii due to some PanAm posters on our suit wall. PanAm was the pioneer in pacific flights to Hawaii and Asia. Early flights used flying boats and island hopping (stops in Hawaii, Midway Atoll, Wake Island, Guam) to get to the Philippines from US West Coast. Kind of reminded me of the current BEVs that need multiple charges for long road trips. Those early flights were also unreliable (many flying boats were involved in accidents). The whole phase took about 10 years (from 1935 to 1945). By the end of WWII the aviation had progressed so much that flying boats were phased out and jet engines gradually took over with non-stop flights over pacific.
 

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I think Bolt and Kona fire issues are blown out of proportion.
Only light pushback here, but to be fair, Bolt and Kona are the result of known manufacturing defects in the construction of the battery. It is somewhat worse, according to GM, that the battery manufacturer's investigation didn't reveal the extent of the problem until GM independently investigated (more than one manufacturing facilityinvolved). I'm sure that there is more to be learned in the litigation between GM and LG Chem.
 

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Only light pushback here, but to be fair, Bolt and Kona are the result of known manufacturing defects in the construction of the battery. It is somewhat worse, according to GM, that the battery manufacturer's investigation didn't reveal the extent of the problem until GM independently investigated (more than one manufacturing facilityinvolved). I'm sure that there is more to be learned in the litigation between GM and LG Chem.
I am a bit confused here. There has been 21 Bolt fires out of 140,000 cars. That is one fire per 6666 cars (hmmm, suspicious number!). According to IIHS there has been one non-crash fire claims for every 7,002 cars built between 2016 and 2018, and this is by December 2018, so basically 2 year old cars. Am I comparing apples and oranges here? 2016-2018 Tesla Model S/X had 10 fires each for about 40,000 cars sold in the US. That is more than 2 times Bolt fires for cars on average younger than the Bolt fleet.
 
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