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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I am planning to take a road trip from Oklahoma to Minnesota and committed to taking my ID4 (unless there is snow, I will use my ICE car).

With temps expected to be in the mid 30s and overnight in the teens, I am expecting some drop in range.On highway in 50f to 80f I am getting about 170 miles to a 90% charge. What should I expect in freezing temps? Can anyone share their experiences with cold weather hi way range.

Thanks
 

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About 30~35% reduction from 68f weather is perfectly normal if it’s around 15f outside

This is especially the case for shorter trips. For long trips the range should improve once the battery has warmed up.
 

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VW ID.4 1st (picked up 3/19/21).
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Hello everyone,

I am planning to take a road trip from Oklahoma to Minnesota and committed to taking my ID4 (unless there is snow, I will use my ICE car).

With temps expected to be in the mid 30s and overnight in the teens, I am expecting some drop in range.On highway in 50f to 80f I am getting about 170 miles to a 90% charge. What should I expect in freezing temps? Can anyone share their experiences with cold weather hi way range.

Thanks
I would try and avoid DCFC 1st thing in the morning when the batteries are stone cold.
 

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Set yout trip on A Better Route Planner site, then play with all the weather settings (wind, ambient temp, rain) and vehicle setting - such things I would never thought would impact the range.

The ABRP is very conservative, so you will get your worst case scenario. Real range will probably be better than indicated.
 

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Doing 65mph....you will have no problem hitting 200+ miles from 100% SOC. Easy mathematics agresive numbers 2.5 kw per hour 3+ hours of driving 7.5 kw is used for heating....considering you didn't start with bone cold HV Battery....
Only thing that you should be worried is missing exist for charging....if you plan right...it doesn't matter what your efficiency is.
 

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The secret to longer range with EVs is accelerate fast to enjoy your EV and drive slow to extend your range. If you ask me, the fact that EVs, including Tesla, lose range to speeds higher than 65 mph, kill all the joy in taking an EV on long trips. It almost feels like a family should have a larger ICEV or PHEV vehicle for longer trips and a smaller EV for in-town driving, where speeds rarely exceed 65 mph, and if they do, the range easily covers the average miles driven per day.
 

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The secret to longer range with EVs is accelerate fast to enjoy your EV and drive slow to extend your range. If you ask me, the fact that EVs, including Tesla, lose range to speeds higher than 65 mph, kill all the joy in taking an EV on long trips. It almost feels like a family should have a larger ICEV or PHEV vehicle for longer trips and a smaller EV for in-town driving, where speeds rarely exceed 65 mph, and if they do, the range easily covers the average miles driven per day.
What really kills Tesla owners that they can't hit EPA Tesla numbers on highway doing 65 mph.
But on paper it is quite amazing and very good point for bragging rights .
And Auto pilot that is abused by many owners and when they live to say the story to the police and emergency...they will usually blame Tesla Auto pilot for accident to have themselves out of problem.....but it is owners fault if he slammed Fire fighter's vehicle or similar other accidents. There is no such thing as autonomous system so if even 0.5% is chance to fail ( will you put your life or life of your family on the line)
Again stated fact i had observing couple models from Tesla...not just one day but for weeks at the time.
 

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2021 ID.4 Pro, Glacier White
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The secret to longer range with EVs is accelerate fast to enjoy your EV and drive slow to extend your range. If you ask me, the fact that EVs, including Tesla, lose range to speeds higher than 65 mph, kill all the joy in taking an EV on long trips. It almost feels like a family should have a larger ICEV or PHEV vehicle for longer trips and a smaller EV for in-town driving, where speeds rarely exceed 65 mph, and if they do, the range easily covers the average miles driven per day.
Accelerating rapidly does more to shorten range than higher speeds actually

You did hit one nail on the head though - An EV with a 250+ mile range typically has an 80Kw or larger battery and that means they're much heavier than shorter range cars. If you don't regularly make use of that extended range, an EV with a smaller battery would make more sense for you, because it's not hauling around a thousand pounds of battery you're almost never using, so the lighter car is more energy efficient - It will go farther using less energy than the much heavier car. I'm still daily driving my 2012 Mitsubishi iMiEV with it's 16Kw battery and short, 60 to 65 mile range. It's no good on the freeway, though I do use I-110 for about 3 miles each way to get to and from town. For around town use though, it has it all over my ID.4 - It's very nimble and easy to drive, it's much easier to park, it's much easier to get into and out of, it has much better forward visibility (actually, better all around visibility) and for cargo, I can get a full sized washer or dryer in the back with the seats folded down and still close the hatch. Also, I just prefer not to park a $45K car in most parking lots while grocery shopping . . . .
 

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What really kills Tesla owners that they can't hit EPA Tesla numbers on highway doing 65 mph.
But on paper it is quite amazing and very good point for bragging rights .
And Auto pilot that is abused by many owners and when they live to say the story to the police and emergency...they will usually blame Tesla Auto pilot for accident to have themselves out of problem.....but it is owners fault if he slammed Fire fighter's vehicle or similar other accidents. There is no such thing as autonomous system so if even 0.5% is chance to fail ( will you put your life or life of your family on the line)
Again stated fact i had observing couple models from Tesla...not just one day but for weeks at the time.
No one ever gets the promised range in a Tesla if driving at true highway speeds (say 75-85 mph). However, even with the reduced range at these speeds, you still make easily from one supercharger to another, which are usually located at decent shopping/restaurant areas, always function well, and charge you fairly quickly. This is unlike Electrify America chargers that are mostly located at the far ends of the Walmart parking lots with the only shopping /restaurant available within a reasonable walking distance being Walmart itself and whatever the junk food you can get there. Additionally, Electrify America chargers often malfunction or outright broken.

So, even though I haven’t yet taken an EV on an out-of-town trip where I have to use Level 3 chargers, I suspect traveling long distance in an ID.4 will be significantly impaired compared to making the same trip in a modern Tesla. I tried to map out a trip from Georgia (where I live) to Quebec (where I own a summer home), and the usual route via Maine and New Brunswick did not avail me with the Level 3 chargers (on the American side) that would allow me to follow that route in an ID.4, considering its true range. I would have to be diverted to going via Montreal, to be able to make it from one Level 3 charger to another, so a few hundred extra miles would be added to my trip.

I would be able to use the shortest (usual) route if I were driving a modern Tesla, though, because of the carefully and deliberately planted Tesla Supercharger locations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You're only getting 170 miles from a 90% charge? That sounds really, really low to me
This is at Oklahoma turnpike speeds of 80 mph. Nice to get around quickly but not good for the range. I get much better on normal highways.
 

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No one ever gets the promised range in a Tesla if driving at true highway speeds (say 75-85 mph). However, even with the reduced range at these speeds, you still make easily from one supercharger to another, which are usually located at decent shopping/restaurant areas, always function well, and charge you fairly quickly. This is unlike Electrify America chargers that are mostly located at the far ends of the Walmart parking lots with the only shopping /restaurant available within a reasonable walking distance being Walmart itself and whatever the junk food you can get there. Additionally, Electrify America chargers often malfunction or outright broken.

So, even though I haven’t yet taken an EV on an out-of-town trip where I have to use Level 3 chargers, I suspect traveling long distance in an ID.4 will be significantly impaired compared to making the same trip in a modern Tesla. I tried to map out a trip from Georgia (where I live) to Quebec (where I own a summer home), and the usual route via Maine and New Brunswick did not avail me with the Level 3 chargers (on the American side) that would allow me to follow that route in an ID.4, considering its true range. I would have to be diverted to going via Montreal, to be able to make it from one Level 3 charger to another, so a few hundred extra miles would be added to my trip.

I would be able to use the shortest (usual) route if I were driving a modern Tesla, though, because of the carefully and deliberately planted Tesla Supercharger locations.
I do agree with Tesla dedicated network and strategy....where other EV makers are focused on making EV and have nothing after sales...not even building networks to feel it with electrons. Tesla is busting the Party and will open his network for others....
 

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This is at Oklahoma turnpike speeds of 80 mph. Nice to get around quickly but not good for the range. I get much better on normal highways.
Yup. Just taking rolling resistance and air resistance into account at 80 MPH, you couldn't really do any better than about 2.65 mi/kWh at 80 MPH in an ID.4, and that's with perfect conditions, no climate control and 100% efficiency in converting energy in the battery to power to the wheels. In other words, something closer to 2.5 mi/kWh is close to the best you could expect, so your 170 miles of range with initial 90% SOC is pretty much on par in mild weather and no elevation gain or loss. Drop your speed to 60 MPH and you'd gain roughly an additional mile/kWh, though they'd probably banish you to Vermont!!
 

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Be nice to Vermont, the speed limit on unposted roads (which is a lot of them) is 50 MPH. That's pretty fast on a curvy gravel road in the woods. Which is leveraged in the road rally community up there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
To update everyone who may be interested. I made a 680ish mile road trip from Tulsa, OK to Rochester, MN; passing through Joplin, Kansas City, and Des Moines. On the return trip, the temp was 17f and I averaged 1.8 mi/kWh until the temp got over 30f. Other than that, the average was 2.4 mi/kWh

The whole trip was interstate highway with speed limits of 70 - 75 mph. A couple of times, I charged to 100% because of lack of charging stations in the Mid-West. I was well behaved and stuck to the speed limits. Based on the distance covered and remaining miles estimated, 200 miles to a 100% charge may be possible. each leg of the trip was about 110 - 150 miles; only because of the limited number of fast chargers along the route.

Not once did I see an Electrify America charge point. good think I can use them for free!!!!
 
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