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I did a test drive and really loved it. When it comes to comfort and handling, I personally think it's much better the Model Y.

However, I did notice one odd thing. After I parked the car, I noticed the car was still using power. It kept creeping up to 1.8 kW (or "kWh/h" in VW speak) when I had to exit the car. It could very well be the power drain would have increases even further had I stayed in the car longer.

As you can see from the photo, the A/C was off, seat heating was off and (as said) the car was parked, not driving. Outside temperature was 50F (10C). I do see 74 and 70F underneath the seat icons, but I don't know if that means the heating is on. Even if the heating was on, 1.8kW seems a bit excessive. What could possibly be using 1.8kW?

I saw a video from an ID.3 owner in the UK or Ireland a while ago that showed the car always heats the battery to I think 13C, even for short trips, and that's why the ID.3 gets like a horrible 70 or 80 miles range when used in winter for only short trips (with enough time in between the trips for the battery to cool down). We were the first ones to drive the ID.4 that day. Could it be that the ID.4 was still pre-heating the battery from 10C to 13C after 37 minutes of test driving?

Has anyone who already owns an ID4 seen this behavior?

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Does that number reflect instantaneous usage or is it a rolling average? I'm thinking it's a rolling average over X minutes and that's why VW uses the awkward kWh/h instead of just kW. Just speculating though.
 

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Not having an ID.4, I can only speculate as well, however, I wouldn't be too concerned, there are many system that still operate even after you first stop the car. The fact that the screen was still on, the car was still on. The car could still be heating or cooling components or could be charging the 12V battery. It could also just be the way the ID.4 calculated the kWh/h. A better indication is observing longer period - just note the percentage charge left when shutting down the vehicle and check again when first start up the next day (although that is not accurate either as I have had instances when the battery percentage was higher after the off period then at the end of the previous drive - the percentages/ranges/consumptions are just guesses by the computer).
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Does that number reflect instantaneous usage or is it a rolling average? I'm thinking it's a rolling average over X minutes and that's why VW uses the awkward kWh/h instead of just kW. Just speculating though.
The 1.8 is the current usage (in Kw) I saw the number creep up while parked, the average in the bottom right corner (2.7 mi/kWh).
 

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However, I did notice one odd thing. After I parked the car, I noticed the car was still using power. It kept creeping up to 1.8 kW (or "kWh/h" in VW speak) when I had to exit the car. It could very well be the power drain would have increases even further had I stayed in the car longer.

As you can see from the photo, the A/C was off, seat heating was off and (as said) the car was parked, not driving. Outside temperature was 50F (10C). I do see 74 and 70F underneath the seat icons, but I don't know if that means the heating is on. Even if the heating was on, 1.8kW seems a bit excessive. What could possibly be using 1.8kW?

I saw a video from an ID.3 owner in the UK or Ireland a while ago that showed the car always heats the battery to I think 13C, even for short trips, and that's why the ID.3 gets like a horrible 70 or 80 miles range when used in winter for only short trips (with enough time in between the trips for the battery to cool down). We were the first ones to drive the ID.4 that day. Could it be that the ID.4 was still pre-heating the battery from 10C to 13C after 37 minutes of test driving?

Has anyone who already owns an ID4 seen this behavior?

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I see a couple of things: The immediate 1.8kWh/h is likely from a combination of keeping the car's computer energized as well as possibly some battery heating.

The 2.7mi/kWh figure is low because it's 50F outside, and you've only driven 17 miles. The battery heating killed you here. If you've got an EVSE available - or even just a granny plug - you can preheat the car before you leave while it's still plugged in to help with those numbers. I think you'll still only be in the 3.3-3.4 mi/kWh range at best at 50F though. I've had my car for 1000 miles between 60-88F, and I'm averaging 3.7 mi/kWh with mostly 35-45MPH local roads, about 1/4 of the miles are freeway miles at 70MPH or so.

Yea, there are more efficient cars out there, and Tesla is the best at it. They've had a decade to get better at it, VW is just getting started. I wish it was better, but it's fine for now. Better stuff coming.
 

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Yea, there are more efficient cars out there, and Tesla is the best at it. They've had a decade to get better at it, VW is just getting started. I wish it was better, but it's fine for now. Better stuff coming.
Tesla, but also Hyundai/Kia. The Ioniq (not to be confused with the new Ioniq 5 which has not been tested) is the most efficient EV around. And the Kona and Niro both do very well (easily beating their advertised ranges). My Kona never gets below 3 miles/kWh even in the dead or winter. Right now it’s between 4.8-5 (ideal conditions).

The major things playing against the ID.4’s favor in terms of efficiency is curb weight (+200 lbs vs the Y), fairly high ground clearance (+1.6 vs Y and 2.5” vs Mach-E), and rear hatch/greenhouse design which is less egg shaped - the ideal shape for low wind resistance/efficiency at speed.


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Tesla, but also Hyundai/Kia. The Ioniq (not to be confused with the new Ioniq 5 which has not been tested) is the most efficient EV around. And the Kona and Niro both do very well (easily beating their advertised ranges). My Kona never gets below 3kw/mile even in the dead or winter. Right now it’s between 4.8-5 (ideal conditions).

The major things playing against the ID.4’s favor in terms of efficiency is curb weight (+200 lbs vs the Y), fairly high ground clearance (+1.6 vs Y and 2.5” vs Mach-E), and rear hatch/greenhouse design which is less egg shaped - the ideal shape for low wind resistance/efficiency at speed.


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All good points!

Alas, the less egg-shaped rear hatch/greenhouse design is exactly why I bought the ID.4 over the Y and Mach - E; I find it much more useful for transporting stuff.
 

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All good points!

Alas, the less egg-shaped rear hatch/greenhouse design is exactly why I bought the ID.4 over the Y and Mach - E; I find it much more useful for transporting stuff.
Agreed! I was definitely willing to trade some efficiency for the greater practicality and cargo carrying ability. My ID.4 will be used for trips up to the lake w/ the occasional air mattress thrown in the back and maybe towing of a jet ski (if I can convince my other half to let me get one lol).

My apologies for straying off topic.


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My Kona never gets below 3kw/mile even in the dead or winter.
3kW[h]/mile is terrible!!!! (and that's the best it will get?) :) That would only give you 21 mile range on the 64 kWh battery. Guessing it should be Miles/kWh.
 
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