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Given the ID4 has 5 klw of buffer in its 82 klw battery, will VW likely increase its range by a OTA future software update? For example, if they added 3 more klw how many additional miles could they get? Seems this could be an advantage over the Tesla Standard Range MY w/ only a 50-60 klw battery?
 

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It might. Audi seems.to be doing so with their eTron in new year models. For some reason though they're not updating software on older year models.
 

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VW ID.4 1st Max | Mangan Gray
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i would think they would update their drivetrain and battery management system[bms] first before they are asking for their reserve capacity. time will tell
 

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You get 250 miles on the 77kwh, which gives you 3.25 miles/kwh.

At that rate, an extra 3 kwh would only add about 10 miles. Adding back all 5kwh would give about 16. Not a whole lot, really.
 

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ID.4 1st Blue
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I think range improvements are very well possible. For one, we know all subsystems can be updated over the air. So rollout is eventually trivial enough. Second, it is highly likely that efficiencies for the MEB platform itself, and also with the ID.4 body on top of it, are not fully realized. Tesla shows that even years into a model, drivetrain efficiency gains are possible. For VW I expect decent gains in better interplay of subsystems as software further matures. Third, there is the extra battery capacity as mentioned above. Finally, VW can choose to run the more extensive EPA range test suite, and tailor their software to it a bit more, as Tesla does. I suppose real-world experience might make them more adventurous in that department.
All told, I hope to see a 15% range gain over the lifetime of my car. (emphasis on hope)
 
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Do we know if we'll be able to charge our ID.4 to 100% because it has the reserve? Or are we supposed to only charge to 90% for every day use (like Tesla) resulting in a real world range of less than 250 miles?
 

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ID.4 1st Blue
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My understanding is that 100% = 77 kWh. And that yes, we can charge to any level we desire. It is simply better for battery life to charge to less than 100%.

My own plan is to charge overnight to 80% for regular use. The night before a long drive I will let it charge to 100% at home. During a long road trip it is more advantageous to stop more frequently and charge, say, from 10% to 50% or so. This allows you to exploit the high charge rate at low levels of charge, and thus minimizes total trip time. During a longer lunch break you can let it go higher of course.
 

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Makes sense. So, if I charge to 90% on a daily basis, this is essentially the same as charging to 85% of the full battery (i.e. 90% x 77 kWh = 69.7 kWh. And 69.7 kWh / 82 kWh = 85%). Wouldn't this be plenty conservative?
 

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Makes sense. So, if I charge to 90% on a daily basis, this is essentially the same as charging to 85% of the full battery (i.e. 90% x 77 kWh = 69.7 kWh. And 69.7 kWh / 82 kWh = 85%). Wouldn't this be plenty conservative?
Probably okay, but the ID.3 manual says to do what @ChristophW has been proposing, 80% for regular use. The manual ID.3 also discourages DC fast charge (DCFC) as less desirable than L1 or L2 to 80%. The ID.4 EU manual is the same, as probably will be ours when VWoA releases an ID.4 manual.

I don't think the manual directly addresses his 10% to 50% strategy, but that certainly makes sense too, to get the fastest DC fast charge times.
 

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ID.4 1st Blue
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I took the 10-50% idea from this video, where he showed that he charged an extra 1.5 full charges with the same amount of total charging time over a 2000 mile trip:
 
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His videos are good. I guess the only complication for driving in less covered areas is if something goes wrong at the first charge station, would you still have enough charge to just go one to the second? That is certainly one area where Tesla generally has us beat, at least for now.

In my limited 6 months with Chevy Bolt (the smaller battery), there were several short legs, but more than once something went wrong. The most annoying, but easiest to fix was an EVgo (one spot) down on one side of the highway, and having to go to the next exit, turn around, charge at the working EVgo on the wrong direction rest stop, then go to the next exit to get back on the highway in the correct direction, passing the first one on my way out again. So, some tens of lost miles, at night, tens of miles lost from that next leg.

It's been a very long time, I think in my small jet, it was something like enough fuel to get to the alternate airport, plus another 20% for possible delays. That can be pretty tough for an EV, especially in areas where L3 charge stations are few and far apart. Back up plan is L2 for enough charge to get to the next L3 station, but L2 can be very slow when traveling as opposed to when the car is in the garage overnight at home while sleeping.
 
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