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Discussion Starter #1
I am wondering if someone can help me out here.

I just purchased a Juicebox 40 and I am now unsure if an electrician will be able to install a 240V outlet with 50A in my garage. There is a panel, but no room for a double pole 50A circuit breaker. Therefore, I am thinking a sub panel would need to be installed which I am thinking will be too expensive. Also I don’t own my house so putting in a bunch of money for this doesn’t make sense.

So I started to look at other options and I found Neocharge. My dryer is in a room right next to my garage where I will be able to charge my car. The Neocharge allows you to plug in the dryer and a charger for the car. However, I am guessing that my 240V outlet for the dryer is only 30A. So would my Juicebox 40 be able to even use that outlet? Or should I try to return it for something that will work on 30A?

Here is more info on the Neocharge.

 

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2021 ID.4 1st Edition (on order), 2012 CC Sport, 1986 Golf (former), 1967 Beetle (former)
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Do you drive more than 50 miles a day? If not, you might get by without a wallbox.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you drive more than 50 miles a day? If not, you might get by without a wallbox.
Funny enough I used to drive 60 miles a day, but thankfully not anymore. I just want something that is faster than an L1. But maybe I should put this on the back burner for awhile. The federal incentive is a pain to miss, but I shouldn’t spend more money just for that.
 

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I have a zero commute, but got caught up in the incentives of the fed tax credit and rebate from my utility company. I am two miles from an EA station and there are several dozen free public L2 chargers in the business parks near my house (generally left idle due to COVID office closures).
 

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I am wondering if someone can help me out here.

I just purchased a Juicebox 40 and I am now unsure if an electrician will be able to install a 240V outlet with 50A in my garage. There is a panel, but no room for a double pole 50A circuit breaker. Therefore, I am thinking a sub panel would need to be installed which I am thinking will be too expensive. Also I don’t own my house so putting in a bunch of money for this doesn’t make sense.

So I started to look at other options and I found Neocharge. My dryer is in a room right next to my garage where I will be able to charge my car. The Neocharge allows you to plug in the dryer and a charger for the car. However, I am guessing that my 240V outlet for the dryer is only 30A. So would my Juicebox 40 be able to even use that outlet? Or should I try to return it for something that will work on 30A?

Here is more info on the Neocharge.

That Neocharge is an interesting find! Given that the thing is smart on its own, why bother with a Jukebox or other wall charger? You could plug a 240V capable J1772 cable straight into the Neocharge.
 

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I am wondering if someone can help me out here.

I just purchased a Juicebox 40 and I am now unsure if an electrician will be able to install a 240V outlet with 50A in my garage. There is a panel, but no room for a double pole 50A circuit breaker. Therefore, I am thinking a sub panel would need to be installed which I am thinking will be too expensive. Also I don’t own my house so putting in a bunch of money for this doesn’t make sense.

So I started to look at other options and I found Neocharge. My dryer is in a room right next to my garage where I will be able to charge my car. The Neocharge allows you to plug in the dryer and a charger for the car. However, I am guessing that my 240V outlet for the dryer is only 30A. So would my Juicebox 40 be able to even use that outlet? Or should I try to return it for something that will work on 30A?

Here is more info on the Neocharge.

Look at your panel and read the breaker rating (e.g. "30") on the double pole breaker in the panel for the dryer.

The load can only be 80% of the breaker rating, so if for example, it is a double pole 30, your charge station can only run continuous up to 24A, no more.

You may not need a Neo if you are comfortable just unplugging the dryer, and plugging in the EVSE charge station as needed. You cannot run them both at the same time.

Another possibility is that most EVs come with a 120V L1 charge cord. However, most of them were built for international voltages and can work also at 240 V with an adapter (mass market now for each car where it works). ID.4 TBD. The current is usually limited to 12A or 8A, but at least it is 240V "L2" charging. When people first started doing this (Chevy Volt Gen. 1), I argued against it, but they all seem okay, and I have not heard about a single safety incident related to a well built adapter. Technically, the adapters probably violate some code, but once proven, they all seem fine. Slower than a high current wall station, better than 120V charging. (The adapter is internally wired to let you plug the 120V OEM charge cord plug into a 240V outlet, like a dryer outlet). Not sure how people do the OEM and adapter if it does not reach, ideally it would be some kind of heavy duty cord rated for a 240V circuit (not a regular 120V extension cord).

Otherwise, consider a wall station of 24A or less (if the dryer breaker is "30A"), or a charge station that can be set (there are some by a switch). Not suggesting it necessarily (and maybe the juicebox is configurable too?), but by way of example, a chargepoint flex can be set by 24A.
 

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That Neocharge is an interesting find! Given that the thing is smart on its own, why bother with a Jukebox or other wall charger? You could plug a 240V capable J1772 cable straight into the Neocharge.
Or, this. Or just plug the 240V capable J1772 cable straight into the dryer outlet (the Neo turns off the car charge while using the dryer, that could be convenient).

The 240V capable J1772 still has to be a "EVSE" with all the safety stuff and electronics that tells the car the how much power it can use, like these, just for example, Amazing e / Clipper Creek (looks like only 16A or 32A?). The 16A might be a good option.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That Neocharge is an interesting find! Given that the thing is smart on its own, why bother with a Jukebox or other wall charger? You could plug a 240V capable J1772 cable straight into the Neocharge.
I was thinking of this too. Problem is the way my dryer outlet is situated it is right in a corner. I would have room to plug the dryer into one side of the NeoCharge, but not the car in the other. I am going to email the NeoCharge people to see if they have any suggestions. I am unsure if it would be safe to plug the NeoCharge into the outlet via a 240V extension cord.

Look at your panel and read the breaker rating (e.g. "30") on the double pole breaker in the panel for the dryer.

The load can only be 80% of the breaker rating, so if for example, it is a double pole 30, your charge station can only run continuous up to 24A, no more.

You may not need a Neo if you are comfortable just unplugging the dryer, and plugging in the EVSE charge station as needed. You cannot run them both at the same time.

Another possibility is that most EVs come with a 120V L1 charge cord. However, most of them were built for international voltages and can work also at 240 V with an adapter (mass market now for each car where it works). ID.4 TBD. The current is usually limited to 12A or 8A, but at least it is 240V "L2" charging. When people first started doing this (Chevy Volt Gen. 1), I argued against it, but they all seem okay, and I have not heard about a single safety incident related to a well built adapter. Technically, the adapters probably violate some code, but once proven, they all seem fine. Slower than a high current wall station, better than 120V charging. (The adapter is internally wired to let you plug the 120V OEM charge cord plug into a 240V outlet, like a dryer outlet). Not sure how people do the OEM and adapter if it does not reach, ideally it would be some kind of heavy duty cord rated for a 240V circuit (not a regular 120V extension cord).

Otherwise, consider a wall station of 24A or less (if the dryer breaker is "30A"), or a charge station that can be set (there are some by a switch). Not suggesting it necessarily (and maybe the juicebox is configurable too?), but by way of example, a chargepoint flex can be set by 24A.
These are definitely good points. My dryer outlet is on a double pole 30A breaker. I was thinking of just unplugging the dryer and using a 24A EVSE, but the way it is situated it is a chore to get to the outlet. I would have to pull out the dryer and then pull out the washing machine to get to the outlet.

Or, this. Or just plug the 240V capable J1772 cable straight into the dryer outlet (the Neo turns off the car charge while using the dryer, that could be convenient).

The 240V capable J1772 still has to be a "EVSE" with all the safety stuff and electronics that tells the car the how much power it can use, like these, just for example, Amazing e / Clipper Creek (looks like only 16A or 32A?). The 16A might be a good option.
Thanks, I will look into those!

Thank you, I will look into these as well!

Thanks for your help everyone. I will keep you updated.
 

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One last thought, maybe the electrician could move the 240V outlet to a slightly better place (although the dryer still has to plug in, so possibly less helpful). At least we have some time to delivery.
 

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Another alternative to Neocharge is Dryer Buddy (Plus)...


(There is currently an extremely annoying halloween theme pumpkins on the website so couldn't stay on too long but hopefully page goes back to normal on 11/1.)

Whichever product you choose, if you want to share the the outlet with the EV & the dryer, I would highly recommend getting one of the splitters. Those 240 volt plugs are not really designed for constant unplugging and re-plugging.

The 30A outlet (24A maximum output) will only get you to 5.7 kW but that is still good for 140-150 miles added over 8 hour charge. Unless you drive an insane amount each day or have very short off-peak rate window, 5.7 kW is more than enough to charge daily.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
One last thought, maybe the electrician could move the 240V outlet to a slightly better place (although the dryer still has to plug in, so possibly less helpful). At least we have some time to delivery.
Definitely an option as well.

Another alternative to Neocharge is Dryer Buddy (Plus)...


(There is currently an extremely annoying halloween theme pumpkins on the website so couldn't stay on too long but hopefully page goes back to normal on 11/1.)

Whichever product you choose, if you want to share the the outlet with the EV & the dryer, I would highly recommend getting one of the splitters. Those 240 volt plugs are not really designed for constant unplugging and re-plugging.

The 30A outlet (24A maximum output) will only get you to 5.7 kW but that is still good for 140-150 miles added over 8 hour charge. Unless you drive an insane amount each day or have very short off-peak rate window, 5.7 kW is more than enough to charge daily.
I was reading about the Dryer Buddy, but this review made me nervous:

But I see they have those Plus and Plus Auto options now, so that is also something to think about.

I am definitely looking at a 16A or 24A L2 charger now.
 

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I was reading about the Dryer Buddy, but this review made me nervous:
I don't have one personally so can only speak to what others have said, however, that is why I referenced the Dryer Buddy Plus.

When the Dryer is off it is drawing little to no amps so the EVSE outlet is switched on allowing your EV to charge. If the Dryer is turned on at any time then the EVSE outlet is switched off, when the Dryer is done, power is restored to the EVSE outlet and if your EV needs charging it will resume charging.

It is more expensive than the standard version but well worth the extra cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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I received an update from NeoCharge, they are really responsive. They said that I can use this extension cord if needed to plug in the NeoCharge to my outlet:


NeoCharge will cost more than the DryerBuddy Plus Auto, but I am unsure if DryerBuddy is UL certified.
Unclear what the quality is on that one, but if they suggested that specific one, it is probably okay. Also, a little odd that there is only one U.S. review (may be a non-issue). At least there are heavy duty 240V extension cords that might solve the problem.

One last thought, it may be legal to have an electrician add another wire and 240V outlet tied to the original one near the dryer. In that possibility, you might be able to get another 240V 30A outlet closer to the garage, or even in the garage. Of course, it is still only one at a time, dryer or car charge, not both. It might not be a bad idea to have an electrician just check the condition of the dryer outlet anyway, especially if you go 24A.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Update. I ordered the NeoCharge and had to get a 240v extension cord to plug it in due to how my dryer outlet is situated. I will probably get the Lectron 16A. The car won’t charge fast, but I think it is the best option for what I have to work with at the moment.
 

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Another possibility is that most EVs come with a 120V L1 charge cord. However, most of them were built for international voltages and can work also at 240 V with an adapter (mass market now for each car where it works). ID.4 TBD. The current is usually limited to 12A or 8A, but at least it is 240V "L2" charging. When people first started doing this (Chevy Volt Gen. 1), I argued against it, but they all seem okay, and I have not heard about a single safety incident related to a well built adapter. Technically, the adapters probably violate some code, but once proven, they all seem fine. Slower than a high current wall station, better than 120V charging. (The adapter is internally wired to let you plug the 120V OEM charge cord plug into a 240V outlet, like a dryer outlet).
I had a Chevy Bolt EV. The included charge cord had a 3-prong plug for Level 1 charging, but it was made clear (on the Bolt forum) that the charge cord would work when plugged into a 240V Level 2 outlet. You just need an adapter, which I bought on Etsy. When charging on Level 2, the default rate is 8 amps but if you slog through the car's menus you can find a screen where (after you have promised that your house wiring is sound) you can set the charging rate to 12 amps. Significantly better than Level 1, and low cost ($50 or so for the adapter). I would use this technique again if I could find a Bolt charging cord. (My cord was returned with the car when the lease ended.)
 

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I had a Chevy Bolt EV. The included charge cord had a 3-prong plug for Level 1 charging, but it was made clear (on the Bolt forum) that the charge cord would work when plugged into a 240V Level 2 outlet. You just need an adapter, which I bought on Etsy. When charging on Level 2, the default rate is 8 amps but if you slog through the car's menus you can find a screen where (after you have promised that your house wiring is sound) you can set the charging rate to 12 amps. Significantly better than Level 1, and low cost ($50 or so for the adapter). I would use this technique again if I could find a Bolt charging cord. (My cord was returned with the car when the lease ended.)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I had a Chevy Bolt EV. The included charge cord had a 3-prong plug for Level 1 charging, but it was made clear (on the Bolt forum) that the charge cord would work when plugged into a 240V Level 2 outlet. You just need an adapter, which I bought on Etsy. When charging on Level 2, the default rate is 8 amps but if you slog through the car's menus you can find a screen where (after you have promised that your house wiring is sound) you can set the charging rate to 12 amps. Significantly better than Level 1, and low cost ($50 or so for the adapter). I would use this technique again if I could find a Bolt charging cord. (My cord was returned with the car when the lease ended.)
This is another possibility for me. Does anyone know how long the L1 charging cable is that comes with the car?
 
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