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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
TRAPPED IN A HOT CAR

On June 15th my old dog was with me in my ID.4. She has cancer and a bad heart. I am 84 and suffer from arthritis which limits motion. It was early in the afternoon in Flagstaff, AZ, at 7,000 feet elevation, ambient temp 90 degrees F. My ‘21 Pro, less than a year old and with 3,000 miles on it, had an SOC in the seventies, so no problem there. We were parked in a shopping center, near Burger King. Since I still think of my car as new, I always try to park in remote areas of parking lots. Also, I get a little exercise that way.

For my dog’s thirteenth birthday we were about to break diet protocol and indulge in a burger, fries and an ice cream cone. We do this every year.

I turned on immediate climate control, holding the temperature at seventy-five, locked the car and went inside to get our treats. Service was fast so I was back in five minutes. To spare my back and enhance the celebration I got in the back seat with my canine companion. The key fob and cell phone were in my pockets as usual. We sat in cool comfort and communed over our snacks. My dog was in heaven. This is the high point of her year.

After a while (thirty minute timer?) the AC shut off so it was time for me to resume the driver’s seat. That’s when I discovered we were locked in. The back doors would not open. I tried pulling the handle twice and pulling it hard. (I have good hand/arm strength and have no trouble handling fifty lb. bags of horse feed). Clicking the key fob three times resulted in solenoid activity inside the rear doors but still they wouldn’t open. The MyVW app didn’t have an unlock function. I wish I had thought of setting the climate control with MyVW but It was getting really hot and I was starting to panic. My old dog was panting hard. Dogs don’t sweat and it doesn’t take much to send a dog, especially an old, compromised dog, into heat stroke.

I didn’t notice whether either of the door lock buttons on the driver’s door was illuminated. But why would they be? I had never touched them. I had been out of the car for five minutes. Doors had opened and closed. The car was stationary.

What were my options? To pound on a window and ask a passer-by to do…what? Call 911? I could do that myself. Besides, I saw nobody around our area. Since I had the fob, could they have opened a front door from outside? I don’t know.

It was getting hotter by the minute. And, remember we were at an altitude of 7,000 ft. The sun always seems more severe at that altitude.

The only reasonable option seemed to be to get to the front seat. I started trying. Head first, feet first. Face up, face down. Arm rests up or down. Driver’s seatback forward or back (I could reach the control for that motorized function, but not the one for moving the seat forward). Between the arm rests, my 200 lb. bulk, severe arthritis, front seats rolled all the way back and a big dog taking up a lot of the back seat, no matter how I struggled I couldn’t get there. I also couldn’t put enough weight on the front seat from my position to activate the switch and turn on the AC or release the rear door locks, in case that might have worked.

My poor dog, beyond panting, was starting to hack and gag. I was feeling weak and a bit faint. My brain felt half asleep. I had the bizarre notion to take off all my sweat-soaked clothes, including bulky new jeans and my work boots, to make it easier to maneuver. Even stripping was difficult, feeling already enervated by the heat and cramped as we were in the back seat. Somehow I managed it and I don’t remember exactly what happened then but I found myself in the driver’s seat, naked. There was nobody around to notice my Adonis-like corpus. The AC was on, the car was cooling rapidly, my dog was back to normal breathing and my head was clearing. The whole emergency had taken about an hour from the time the AC turned off.

After a few minutes of recovery time and getting dressed, as soon I tried to drive home and got “key not detected” and “brake boost limited” messages. I could not shift out of Park. After ten minutes everything cleared and we drove home with no further problem then or since.

Fob problem? Not likely as the car has only 3,000 miles on it and there have been no further incidents. I don’t see how the fob could have been in a blind spot because I had moved it around plenty when I was trying to click open the doors.

Yeah, I can think—now—of things I should have done. Call the dealer? Call VW? Find out where is the magic place to put the fob? Couldn’t find a reference to it in the dreadful manual.

No harm, no foul? Well, maybe.

My conclusion: no matter what else I should or should not have known or done, no matter how bad VW’s software is, no matter how urgent it was for VW to get these cars to market prematurely, this incident should never have been possible and should never have happened. To anyone. Ever.

The experience really shook me. What if we had spent another hour in that car as the temperature increased even more? Will I ever trust the car again? At the moment I don’t. Every time I look at it, I hear “I’m sorry, HAL, I’m afraid I can’t do that…”

The service manager at my dealership, who is ID.4 certified, is taking the incident quite seriously. He is making inquiries by phone and email. The sales manager has already offered me $40,000 for the car, which means breaking the lease, paying the remaining taxes and rebating me $9,000 cash. It also means I can do better elsewhere by buying out the lease and selling the car myself.

I plan to wait a few weeks to see what answers the service manager comes up with and give myself some time to calm down.

Meanwhile, has anyone been similarly locked in?Does anyone know what went wrong or have suggestions about what else I should have done? Other than not getting in the back seat, of course.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Pro S Gradient AWD
Joined
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625 Posts
This sounds like a horrible experience for you and your dog.

The owners manual states that if the "electrical childproof lock" is enabled, the rear doors cannot be opened from the inside. See Page 78. There's an indicator light for this in the driver door.

On Page 75 it says "All doors can be locked from the inside... This can result in locking yourself inside the vehicle." Also this: "Opening the doors from the inside - Pull the opening lever until you feel resistance and push open the door. Do not pull the door opening lever beyond the point of resistance. If the vehicle has been locked from the outside, the door opening lever must be pulled twice, as far as it goes, in order to open the door from the inside."

Now if you had the fob and it didn't work, maybe after a year the battery is close to dead? My GTI fobs went through batteries in about 6 months. But the car warned the driver when the fob battery needed replacement. Does the ID.4 include a similar fob battery warning?

I'm sure you'll get some other suggestions. Again sorry for that awful experience. :(
 

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2014 VW CC (ID.4 Pro S Gradient AWD reserved. The wait begins....)
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I don't have an ID.4...... YET. But it sounds like the child safety locks were on. The outside door would have opened but you couldn't open from the inside. You need to make sure that is disabled. Someone else can chime in on how to do it on this car but I'm sure it's simple. Happy birthday to your dog! 😎
 

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1,103 Posts
I would bet the car can be opened from the inside using the handle under any circumstances. But if one panics anything is possible. Glad you and your dog are okay!
 

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Registered User
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79 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
TRAPPED IN A HOT CAR

On June 15th my old dog was with me in my ID.4. She has cancer and a bad heart. I am 84 and suffer from arthritis which limits motion. It was early in the afternoon in Flagstaff, AZ, at 7,000 feet elevation, ambient temp 90 degrees F. My ‘21 Pro, less than a year old and with 3,000 miles on it, had an SOC in the seventies, so no problem there. We were parked in a shopping center, near Burger King. Since I still think of my car as new, I always try to park in remote areas of parking lots. Also, I get a little exercise that way.

For my dog’s thirteenth birthday we were about to break diet protocol and indulge in a burger, fries and an ice cream cone. We do this every year.

I turned on immediate climate control, holding the temperature at seventy-five, locked the car and went inside to get our treats. Service was fast so I was back in five minutes. To spare my back and enhance the celebration I got in the back seat with my canine companion. The key fob and cell phone were in my pockets as usual. We sat in cool comfort and communed over our snacks. My dog was in heaven. This is the high point of her year.

After a while (thirty minute timer?) the AC shut off so it was time for me to resume the driver’s seat. That’s when I discovered we were locked in. The back doors would not open. I tried pulling the handle twice and pulling it hard. (I have good hand/arm strength and have no trouble handling fifty lb. bags of horse feed). Clicking the key fob three times resulted in solenoid activity inside the rear doors but still they wouldn’t open. The MyVW app didn’t have an unlock function. I wish I had thought of setting the climate control with MyVW but It was getting really hot and I was starting to panic. My old dog was panting hard. Dogs don’t sweat and it doesn’t take much to send a dog, especially an old, compromised dog, into heat stroke.

I didn’t notice whether either of the door lock buttons on the driver’s door was illuminated. But why would they be? I had never touched them. I had been out of the car for five minutes. Doors had opened and closed. The car was stationary.

What were my options? To pound on a window and ask a passer-by to do…what? Call 911? I could do that myself. Besides, I saw nobody around our area. Since I had the fob, could they have opened a front door from outside? I don’t know.

It was getting hotter by the minute. And, remember we were at an altitude of 7,000 ft. The sun always seems more severe at that altitude.

The only reasonable option seemed to be to get to the front seat. I started trying. Head first, feet first. Face up, face down. Arm rests up or down. Driver’s seatback forward or back (I could reach the control for that motorized function, but not the one for moving the seat forward). Between the arm rests, my 200 lb. bulk, severe arthritis, front seats rolled all the way back and a big dog taking up a lot of the back seat, no matter how I struggled I couldn’t get there. I also couldn’t put enough weight on the front seat from my position to activate the switch and turn on the AC or release the rear door locks, in case that might have worked.

My poor dog, beyond panting, was starting to hack and gag. I was feeling weak and a bit faint. My brain felt half asleep. I had the bizarre notion to take off all my sweat-soaked clothes, including bulky new jeans and my work boots, to make it easier to maneuver. Even stripping was difficult, feeling already enervated by the heat and cramped as we were in the back seat. Somehow I managed it and I don’t remember exactly what happened then but I found myself in the driver’s seat, naked. There was nobody around to notice my Adonis-like corpus. The AC was on, the car was cooling rapidly, my dog was back to normal breathing and my head was clearing. The whole emergency had taken about an hour from the time the AC turned off.

After a few minutes of recovery time and getting dressed, as soon I tried to drive home and got “key not detected” and “brake boost limited” messages. I could not shift out of Park. After ten minutes everything cleared and we drove home with no further problem then or since.

Fob problem? Not likely as the car has only 3,000 miles on it and there have been no further incidents. I don’t see how the fob could have been in a blind spot because I had moved it around plenty when I was trying to click open the doors.

Yeah, I can think—now—of things I should have done. Call the dealer? Call VW? Find out where is the magic place to put the fob? Couldn’t find a reference to it in the dreadful manual.

No harm, no foul? Well, maybe.

My conclusion: no matter what else I should or should not have known or done, no matter how bad VW’s software is, no matter how urgent it was for VW to get these cars to market prematurely, this incident should never have been possible and should never have happened. To anyone. Ever.

The experience really shook me. What if we had spent another hour in that car as the temperature increased even more? Will I ever trust the car again? At the moment I don’t. Every time I look at it, I hear “I’m sorry, HAL, I’m afraid I can’t do that…”

The service manager at my dealership, who is ID.4 certified, is taking the incident quite seriously. He is making inquiries by phone and email. The sales manager has already offered me $40,000 for the car, which means breaking the lease, paying the remaining taxes and rebating me $9,000 cash. It also means I can do better elsewhere by buying out the lease and selling the car myself.

I plan to wait a few weeks to see what answers the service manager comes up with and give myself some time to calm down.

Meanwhile, has anyone been similarly locked in?Does anyone know what went wrong or have suggestions about what else I should have done? Other than not getting in the back seat, of course.
Oops. “I’m sorry DAVE…”
 

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Registered User
2021 RWD Pro S, Galaxy White Metallic
Joined
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83 Posts
First off, this is an unacceptable experience and I am glad you have a what sounds like a good dealer working with you.

It might have been the child locks are set to turn on automatically. I think the ID4 ships this way, and you may not have known how to disable it because it's a bit unusual. However, they should not be locking people in the car when it is off.

To disable the childproof locks entirely, you must open the rear door. You will see a weird keyhole type thing. Take the key out of the FOB (the metal key, yes there is one in there believe it or not) and then turn the child lock to the off setting. Now the sensor and lock in the seat is disabled. Next, do the same thing to the other side of the car. Your dealer can certainly help you do this too as it is the same protocol for most VW cars.

I also highly recommend everyone turn their climate settings to 'turn on aux climate when car is unlocked' - this way all you have to do is click the unlock button on your car to fire up the AC or heat. It works like a charm for me! Way better and easier than the app IMO. Of course you have to be in key fob range. And if you walk by the car and it unlocks, that will of course turn the AC on.

Also the car can be opened from the outside if you unlock it from the inside with the fob. The car's mechanical handles can be lifted and opened as well but I don't really know how those work. It also takes a lot of brute strength to get the door open.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Pro S Gradient AWD
Joined
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625 Posts
To disable the childproof locks entirely, you must open the rear door. You will see a weird keyhole type thing. Take the key out of the FOB (the metal key, yes there is one in there believe it or not) and then turn the child lock to the off setting.
I just tried this. The key-slot thing is there, and it will turn about 1/4 turn clockwise, but it's spring-loaded and just returns to the original position. It seems like the only way to turn childproof locks on and off is via the touch switch on the driver door?

On my Q5 that key-slot thing has 2 positions. One position is CP Locking On, the other position is Off.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Pro S Gradient AWD
Joined
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625 Posts
Oops. “I’m sorry DAVE…”
I hope you didn't take offense at my reading-the-manual reply. I'm almost a year into ownership and until this thread popped up I never really paid any attention to how the door locks actually work, considering they're a combination of mechanical and electrical. Certainly never looked into how the childproof locks work either.
 

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Premium Member
ID.4 Pro RWD since 6/21
Joined
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477 Posts
I just tried this. The key-slot thing is there, and it will turn about 1/4 turn clockwise, but it's spring-loaded and just returns to the original position.
I saw the same thing. You can turn it, but there is no click or any indentation to keep it in the position. I tried holding door handles up, but that didn't make a difference. Is it really possible to disable the childproof locks on the ID.4?
 

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Registered User
2021 RWD Pro S, Galaxy White Metallic
Joined
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I just tried this. The key-slot thing is there, and it will turn about 1/4 turn clockwise, but it's spring-loaded and just returns to the original position. It seems like the only way to turn childproof locks on and off is via the touch switch on the driver door?

On my Q5 that key-slot thing has 2 positions. One position is CP Locking On, the other position is Off.
My child lock also returns to the same position but it seems to have nullified the child lock weight sensor. In any event, this is a horrible experience. Keep us updated please as to a fix or resolution.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Pro S Gradient AWD
Joined
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625 Posts
I saw the same thing. You can turn it, but there is no click or any indentation to keep it in the position. I tried holding door handles up, but that didn't make a difference. Is it really possible to disable the childproof locks on the ID.4?
I tried the same things - no difference. And I can find nothing in the manual about disabling CP locks except via the touch switch on the driver door.

In my Q5, that rotary key slot has 2 clear positions, and there's a visual indicator stamped into the sheetmetal showing which position is CPL enabled and which is CPL disabled. No such marking on the ID.4.
 

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359 Posts
TRAPPED IN A HOT CAR

On June 15th my old dog was with me in my ID.4. She has cancer and a bad heart. I am 84 and suffer from arthritis which limits motion. It was early in the afternoon in Flagstaff, AZ, at 7,000 feet elevation, ambient temp 90 degrees F. My ‘21 Pro, less than a year old and with 3,000 miles on it, had an SOC in the seventies, so no problem there. We were parked in a shopping center, near Burger King. Since I still think of my car as new, I always try to park in remote areas of parking lots. Also, I get a little exercise that way.

For my dog’s thirteenth birthday we were about to break diet protocol and indulge in a burger, fries and an ice cream cone. We do this every year.

I turned on immediate climate control, holding the temperature at seventy-five, locked the car and went inside to get our treats. Service was fast so I was back in five minutes. To spare my back and enhance the celebration I got in the back seat with my canine companion. The key fob and cell phone were in my pockets as usual. We sat in cool comfort and communed over our snacks. My dog was in heaven. This is the high point of her year.

After a while (thirty minute timer?) the AC shut off so it was time for me to resume the driver’s seat. That’s when I discovered we were locked in. The back doors would not open. I tried pulling the handle twice and pulling it hard. (I have good hand/arm strength and have no trouble handling fifty lb. bags of horse feed). Clicking the key fob three times resulted in solenoid activity inside the rear doors but still they wouldn’t open. The MyVW app didn’t have an unlock function. I wish I had thought of setting the climate control with MyVW but It was getting really hot and I was starting to panic. My old dog was panting hard. Dogs don’t sweat and it doesn’t take much to send a dog, especially an old, compromised dog, into heat stroke.

I didn’t notice whether either of the door lock buttons on the driver’s door was illuminated. But why would they be? I had never touched them. I had been out of the car for five minutes. Doors had opened and closed. The car was stationary.

What were my options? To pound on a window and ask a passer-by to do…what? Call 911? I could do that myself. Besides, I saw nobody around our area. Since I had the fob, could they have opened a front door from outside? I don’t know.

It was getting hotter by the minute. And, remember we were at an altitude of 7,000 ft. The sun always seems more severe at that altitude.

The only reasonable option seemed to be to get to the front seat. I started trying. Head first, feet first. Face up, face down. Arm rests up or down. Driver’s seatback forward or back (I could reach the control for that motorized function, but not the one for moving the seat forward). Between the arm rests, my 200 lb. bulk, severe arthritis, front seats rolled all the way back and a big dog taking up a lot of the back seat, no matter how I struggled I couldn’t get there. I also couldn’t put enough weight on the front seat from my position to activate the switch and turn on the AC or release the rear door locks, in case that might have worked.

My poor dog, beyond panting, was starting to hack and gag. I was feeling weak and a bit faint. My brain felt half asleep. I had the bizarre notion to take off all my sweat-soaked clothes, including bulky new jeans and my work boots, to make it easier to maneuver. Even stripping was difficult, feeling already enervated by the heat and cramped as we were in the back seat. Somehow I managed it and I don’t remember exactly what happened then but I found myself in the driver’s seat, naked. There was nobody around to notice my Adonis-like corpus. The AC was on, the car was cooling rapidly, my dog was back to normal breathing and my head was clearing. The whole emergency had taken about an hour from the time the AC turned off.

After a few minutes of recovery time and getting dressed, as soon I tried to drive home and got “key not detected” and “brake boost limited” messages. I could not shift out of Park. After ten minutes everything cleared and we drove home with no further problem then or since.

Fob problem? Not likely as the car has only 3,000 miles on it and there have been no further incidents. I don’t see how the fob could have been in a blind spot because I had moved it around plenty when I was trying to click open the doors.

Yeah, I can think—now—of things I should have done. Call the dealer? Call VW? Find out where is the magic place to put the fob? Couldn’t find a reference to it in the dreadful manual.

No harm, no foul? Well, maybe.

My conclusion: no matter what else I should or should not have known or done, no matter how bad VW’s software is, no matter how urgent it was for VW to get these cars to market prematurely, this incident should never have been possible and should never have happened. To anyone. Ever.

The experience really shook me. What if we had spent another hour in that car as the temperature increased even more? Will I ever trust the car again? At the moment I don’t. Every time I look at it, I hear “I’m sorry, HAL, I’m afraid I can’t do that…”

The service manager at my dealership, who is ID.4 certified, is taking the incident quite seriously. He is making inquiries by phone and email. The sales manager has already offered me $40,000 for the car, which means breaking the lease, paying the remaining taxes and rebating me $9,000 cash. It also means I can do better elsewhere by buying out the lease and selling the car myself.

I plan to wait a few weeks to see what answers the service manager comes up with and give myself some time to calm down.

Meanwhile, has anyone been similarly locked in?Does anyone know what went wrong or have suggestions about what else I should have done? Other than not getting in the back seat, of course.
It happened with me during my test drive. After driving the car for a while my wife wanted to check the comfort on back seat so she moved to the back and I was driving, when we reached back at our dealership she was not able to open the door and I started fumbling with controls. I noticed an icon with child safety symbol so I pressed that and still she was not able to open the door, I pressed that again asked her to try again and it worked this time. I am almost sure child lock was off but did not pay too much attention and why would it work second time? I jokingly told my dealer I locked her on back seat by mistake and he was like yeah it happens as everything is touch, you some times touch it and don't even realize its locked.
I was also watching a regular ID4 experience video of a long time user and he also mentioned, so many times people keep complaining about unable to open the back door.

I really don't care too much about touch buttons in infotainment area but I feel like at least, any controls on steering and door handles have to be physical buttons. There are already some incidences where people are triggering ACC by accident, also a lot of people touch rear window button and by mistake operate rear window instead of front ones and vice a versa.
 

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It is a case where the car is in charge and the occupants have to adapt. All cars are like this though some work easier for a certain individual than others. Subaru sucked hard for me. I used to get cut all the time getting in and out.
 

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It is a case where the car is in charge and the occupants have to adapt. All cars are like this though some work easier for a certain individual than others. Subaru sucked hard for me. I used to get cut all the time getting in and out.
Issue is, they have completely ignored "What if" part. Because of touch controls in odd places, it's hard. I bet each and every driver has pressed window and child lock control by mistake. I did it during my test drive.
 

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2021 RWD Pro S, Galaxy White Metallic
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I have to be honest: what is the point of electric handles? They seem to bring more complexity and hassle to a vehicle. I honestly can’t think of a single advantage. Not trying to be rude here, if you could hear my voice my tone would be curious not contrite. Can someone tell me the advantage of an electric-assisted door handle?
 

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Enthusiastic 1st Edition Owner
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I have to be honest: what is the point of electric handles? They seem to bring more complexity and hassle to a vehicle. I honestly can’t think of a single advantage. Not trying to be rude here, if you could hear my voice my tone would be curious not contrite. Can someone tell me the advantage of an electric-assisted door handle?
It's actually less complexity from a design standpoint. The latch is directly addressable by the central locking computer, making all lock / unlock / open decisions easily driven through software. This falls right in line with all of the other CAN bus driven components of cars, including lights, wipers, climate controls, etc. It simplifies design, assembly, and probably troubleshooting if the tech is properly equipped. This is versus a strictly mechanical latch that requires a solenoid of some sort to facilitate remote locking.

The other advantages are giving the car a "premium" feel by requiring less lever throw, reduced effort for door opening, automatic opening assist functions especially for heavier doors, and of course aerodynamic, aesthetic and ergonomic design freedom for handle placement and because no clunky lever is required on the exterior.
 

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Enthusiastic 1st Edition Owner
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My i3 is electromechanical and has been since it debuted in 2014. Although the shape and action of the outside handles are more reminiscent of the old style mechanical.

Tesla, Mach-e, the Hyundai/Kia E-GMP cars, Polestar are all electromechanical.

I'd expect the same from Benz, Porsche, Audi, Volvo just because of their "premium car" status, but don't know. I wonder about the F150 Lightning. Does the current ICE F150 use old school mechanical or EM? Ford said they were banking on parts commonality.
 

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Premium Member
2021 Pro S Gradient AWD
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Setting aside the issues of the shape of a door handle and its aerodynamics, I’m not understanding why the standard Kessy-controlled electromechanical door latches and locks used successfully for years in many VW Group vehicles is suddenly in need of a redesign that potentially confuses people. The Kessy system isn’t “dumb” - it uses modules too.

I’m reminded of Jeep’s confusing redesign of the transmission shifter that lead to the death of actor Anton Yelchin (Star Trek). Jeep reverted to the original shifter pronto.

Probably a rhetorical question, no response needed. Gotta keep moving forward. Ha.
 
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