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I have the same EXACT car but 2022. You are not missing anything without the 3.1 software. None of those additional features work well enough to covet the 3.1 software.

I’ve compared the charging curves between the 2021 and the 2022 model years, and the 2021 charges about 10 kW faster above about 40% SOC. Yes, the 2022 can charge at 170+ kW but only under 25%. At 25% SOC, the charging speed goes to 150 kW, and by 30% SOC, the 2021 and the 2022 charge at the same speed. Anything above 45% SOC, and the 2021 charges more quickly. All in all, if you were to go from 10% to 80% SOC, I would guess the time you would spend to charge is about the same between the 2021 and the 2022. With the scarce DC charging infrastructure, I personally don’t feel comfortable riding the 10% to 60% SOC range. Instead, I ride 20+% to 100%, in which case it would take the same time to charge your car as mine or, your car would charge even faster.

I just came from a 550-mile trip from a northern Atlanta suburb to Huntsville, AL, and it was not a pretty picture with what I had to go through vis-à-vis charging. My wife is pissed (this is our third long road trip in the ID.4 in 7 weeks). We have two EVs now and no ICEV. She is demanding we trade in one of our EVs for an ICE SUV. Yes, it’s that bad. For around town, the ID.4 is a great vehicle. For road trips, not so much. The three deficiencies are: scarcity of the CCS charging infrastructure (not specific to the ID.4), short range of the ID.4, and slow charging speeds.

The two axioms with the EV travel that everyone pushes are completely wrong IMO when it comes to non-Tesla-EV long-distance travel:
1. Ride the lower half of the battery SOC. In theory, this makes sense. In todays’s reality, this doesn’t get you far off major interstates.
2. Never charge to 100%. After the first one and a half trips, I found that you should ALWAYS charge the ID.4 to 100% when leaving for a long road trip or while on a long road trip. The extra 25 minutes that you spend charging from 80% to 100% will save your bacon multiple times if you are venturing away from major highways.

My last two trips were to Orlando and to Huntsville. Orlando only had one DC charger with 6 stalls (this is Orlando, for crying out loud). We wasted 6 hours over the course of a three-day weekend just driving to the DC charger in Orlando, waiting in line, and getting a charge). We also put an extra 150 miles on the ID.4 while doing this. Huntsville has exactly ZERO DC chargers. The closest DC charger to Huntsville is 35 miles away in Athens, AL. That’s a 70-miles round-trip (in the wrong direction) and two hours of wasted time just to get a charge so that you can drive back to Atlanta.

Traveling in the ID.4 is akin intentionally complicating one’s life. With the current state of DC charging, the EV should have at a minimum 350 miles worth of real range. The range of 450 miles would make the EV travel feasible and similar to the ICEV travel. At 260 miles, the ID.4 is not a viable long road trip vehicle in the US or Canada. If you are retired and time is not an issue, the ID.4 can get you into most places in populated areas (but it may take twice as long as an ICEV). But, if you value time, the ID.4 is not a road trip vehicle you would want to use.

At this time, long road trip EV travel in the US and Canada means either Tesla (due to the Supercharger network) or Lucid (due to its long battery range). Every other EV on the market today is not a viable long road trip vehicle for people with jobs. For commuting, the ID.4 is brilliant.
 

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What app were you using to find chargers? I see more than a dozen DC chargers in Orlando, albeit only 1 Electrify America. Based on your complaint, you might be better off spending the $10-15 to charge at a non-EA from time to time, instead of wasting time and distance hunting down an EA charger.
All others are 50 kW (or lower) chargers with only one (or two) stalls and as far from the hotel (or farther) as the EA charger. When you only have enough charge to get yourself to a DC charger, and you have a choice of a location with 6 stalls over a location with one stall, you don’t go to a location with one stall. It could be broken with no other stalls as a backup or you may find two or three other EVs waiting in line because they don’t have enough charge remaining to get them to another location. If you have two EVs in front of you at a 50 kW charger, you are stuck there for several hours.

It also depends on where you stay. We had to stay in a particular hotel (which didn’t have overnight L2 chargers), so our only feasible charging place was the sole EA charging site at the Mall of Florida, and even there we had to wait in line every time we got there.
 

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I originally purchased this car thinking it would be my road trip car, mainly for my yearly snowbird trip to Florida. After some issues on a 400+ mile trip to my son's house in Pittsburg, and some months later realizing I didn't want the inconvenience of charging, I changed my plans.
I know many folks road trip this car and I give them credit. I still think this is a great vehicle and my wife loves it and uses it for her 70 mile RT commute. At one point I thought I might be taking the ID.4 to Florida this year because of increased charging speed with the update, (Ha, if it ever comes) and a more mature EA network, but I've realized the ice car is a better option for me. I'll wave to you guys charging at Sheetz while I'm gassing up!
Can we do a group buy for the Li Auto Li One or Li L9? Because this is exactly what we need here in the US for the next 10 years. These vehicles can't get to North America soon enough. 100 miles of real-life electric range and over 600 miles of total range (with the on-board gasoline generator). Perfect solution for both commuting and roadtripping. I'm actually seriously considering importing an L9 from China.

Why can't VW release something like this? They are now building both EVs and have been building ICEVs for almost 100 years. They could release an SUV like this within a year. There is not a single PHEV sold in the US right now that's worth buying because the most they can do is 35 miles of electric range, and even that is on a single underpowered electric motor that can't even accelerate properly. The Li Auto's vehicle are fully electrically propelled with two electric motors even when the generator is in use. I think the Europeans do not comprehend how we drive here in the US. While the ID.4 may be completely fine in Europe for roadtripping, they are not suitable for this task in North America.
 

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Truthseeker. Fortunately road trips are not really in the cards for me, not because of my choice of an EV but mainly because I abhor sitting behind the wheel for anything longer than 2ish hours. Anything that is longer than a 2-3 hour drive I am booking a flight on Delta mainly because living in Atlanta I have non-stop connectivity to pretty much anywhere I want or need to go. I will say I might need to make a trip to St. Marys, GA (~300 miles) to pick up a family heirloom chest and looking at A Better Route Planner its kind of grim as there is one Electrify America station in Cordele, GA along the route, if anything goes wrong there I am going to be having to seek out alternatives that may not be a fast charger.
I hate driving, but even more so, I hate driving to the Atlanta airport, parking, taking a shuttle, getting through security, being shoved in coach, sitting like a sardine in a can for hours, RENTING A CAR, and so on.

My suggestion for the road trip. Always charge to 100%.
 

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There are still a lot of states, especially in the south and midwest, that haven’t been particularly supportive of EVs and EV infrastructure over the years and are only just now really ramping up with the availability of federal funds via the NEVI program just getting started.
Let’s go north. The Dakotas, Montana, Wyoming. Would you venture out in an EV, especially in the winter?

Or how about you drive north of Portland Maine, and try to reach the next DC charger in Canada?
 

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IMO, the ID.4 is more aimed at attempting to be a good road trip car and for me, that makes it much less of a good around town car. It's too big, it's too heavy and both affect it's efficiency. Smaller and lighter, easier to park, better visibility are all keys to a great around town car. When you lean the windshield back so far that you must have larger A pillars to support the roof, visibility suffers - If the ID.4 isn't a good road trip car, I would suggest buying something else - Something smaller, lighter, easier to park, easier to get into and out of and easier to see out of

I've been driving a Mitsubishi iMiEV around town now for more than 10 years and it's still my every day driver - My ID.4 is reserved for longer trips. The Mitsu only has a 16 Kw battery so its very light by comparison, smaller all around, easier to park, much better visibility and it's the easiest car for ingress and egress this old man has ever driven and around town cars are frequently gotten into and out of many times. It's like a mini cargo truck - With the back seats folded flat, you can get a standard sized washer or dryer in the back and still close the hatch and it's not a tall lift to do so

You pick your poison, IMO - If you need (or want) 200 plus mile range, you give up much of what makes a car a good urban vehicle. Few cars can do an excellent job of both. For that reason (and a couple others) I'll be keeping both my urban car and my road trip car . . . . and, I have a gas powered Ford Transit Connect which does everything neither of my EV's can do 🤣
I disagree 100%. If you call the ID.4 too big a vehicle, we won’t be able to agree on much. It’s especially shocking that you live in the US. I can understand a European saying it’s too big, but not an American. One of my gripes is that it’s too small to be an SUV. For the US, it’s a compact around town CUV. For Europe, i can totally understand it being called a mid-size SUV. Their small apartments are the size of our large SUVs.
 

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ID.4 is the perfect road-trip car
As long as there is a place to charge after you drive 200 miles and you drive only along major interstates. This hasn’t been the case in all three road-trips I’ve made so far in the ID.4. None of my destinations had a DC charger so I had to make a charging detour every single time to be able to return from my trip or even be able to drive around at the destination. How is this a perfect road-trip car?

It’s not about the size or the ride quality. The size is subjective, and the ride quality is good. It’s about too small a range for the US (and Canada) and the scarcity of DC chargers in the US (and Canada). I’m sure for Europe, it’s a great road-trip car.

My metro area is larger than many European counties. A daily commute in my metro area could easily be 150 miles for some. When I go for a roadtrip, it’s akin a European crossing the entire EU, which not many Europeans do often. Additionally, their DC charging infrastructure is much more developed than ours. So, yes, for Europe, it’s a great road-trip mid-size SUV. For the US and Canada, it’s a compact CUV that is only good as a commuter car and around-town car similar to most other EVs of this size. Maybe the Model Y is an exception, but even that I’m not sure about, and I own one.
 

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I think it is a bit more case dependant than that. I own a KIA Niro EV, and drove it from Phoenix Arizona to Milwaukee Wisconsin and back in the end of February/ early March. This is a roadtrip of 1800 miles each way that I have done at least a dozen times in an ice vehicle, and this was my first time in an EV. Driving with three adults and luggage it added about 6 hours each way more than a typical trip when you factor in bathroom, eating and sleeping breaks, which I found to not be too bad. The Niro EV also charges at about half the speed of the ID4, so If I had an ID4 at the time it would have been even less of a difference than an ICE vehicle.
Bottom line is it works if you drive along major interstates and you have a place to charge at your destination. It takes significantly longer, but it works.

My three road trips so far were either not along major interstates or I had no place to charge at my destination, or both. So, I had to take significant charging detours to be able to drive at my destination and to be able to get to the next charger on the way back. I also had to charge to 100% so that I wouldn’t have to call a tow truck, which also makes a charging session almost twice as long as it would charging to 80%.

At the end of the day I ask myself why the hell I got rid of my perfectly good ICE SUV, which was great on road trips. I don’t buy the environmental factor. My electricity is not green (I can’t choose green electricity), so my EVs are not green. Getting my own solar roof generation has an ROI of 35 years in my area, and until Russia, China, India, and Africa have a plan to transition to green energy and 100% EVs, what we do here in the US will have a minimal effect on climate change that may not even be measurable. I bought two EVs for convenience, but my road trips have become a huge inconvenience. Unless I buy a LUCID SUV (which doesn’t exist) ot a CyberTruck (which also doesn’t exist), I don’t have a viable road-trip vehicle for most of the US. I can, however drive to Canada if I follow the major interstates in the ID.4. And then I can travel around Canada as long as I map my route ahead of time and don’t deviate from it. Is this a sufficiently good road-trip vehicle solution? Not in my book. It’s almost like riding a train. You have to go where the rails are laid, and in the US, the rail system is pretty darn scarce, whereas in Europe you can get anywhere by rail. Can you travel by train in the US? Sure? Do a lot of people use rail travel in the US? Hell no. It’s slow, costs a fortune, and makes absolutely no sense.
 

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Everyone's experience is different. I drive my ID4 RWD 500 miles every weekend across western Montana and haven't had a single issue. It takes an extra 55 mins, typically.
Because you have a place to charge at both ends. That’s why you are not having any issues. This is not how it works when you travel to a city that has no charging infrastructure and you are staying in a hotel with no destination chargers. As long as you travel along the highway that has DC chargers and both ends of your 500-mile commute have places to charge, of course there is no problem. This is not travel; this is commute.
 
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