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ID.4 is the perfect road-trip car
As long as there is a place to charge after you drive 200 miles and you drive only along major interstates. This hasn’t been the case in all three road-trips I’ve made so far in the ID.4. None of my destinations had a DC charger so I had to make a charging detour every single time to be able to return from my trip or even be able to drive around at the destination. How is this a perfect road-trip car?

It’s not about the size or the ride quality. The size is subjective, and the ride quality is good. It’s about too small a range for the US (and Canada) and the scarcity of DC chargers in the US (and Canada). I’m sure for Europe, it’s a great road-trip car.

My metro area is larger than many European counties. A daily commute in my metro area could easily be 150 miles for some. When I go for a roadtrip, it’s akin a European crossing the entire EU, which not many Europeans do often. Additionally, their DC charging infrastructure is much more developed than ours. So, yes, for Europe, it’s a great road-trip mid-size SUV. For the US and Canada, it’s a compact CUV that is only good as a commuter car and around-town car similar to most other EVs of this size. Maybe the Model Y is an exception, but even that I’m not sure about, and I own one.
 

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As long as there is a place to charge after you drive 200 miles and you drive only along major interstates. This hasn’t been the case in all three road-trips I’ve made so far in the ID.4. None of my destinations had a DC charger so I had to make a charging detour every single time to be able to return from my trip or even be able to drive around at the destination. How is this a perfect road-trip car?

It’s not about the size or the ride quality. The size is subjective, and the ride quality is good. It’s about too small a range for the US (and Canada) and the scarcity of DC chargers in the US (and Canada). I’m sure for Europe, it’s a great road-trip car.

My metro area is larger than many European counties. A daily commute in my metro area could easily be 150 miles for some. When I go for a roadtrip, it’s akin a European crossing the entire EU, which not many Europeans do often. Additionally, their DC charging infrastructure is much more developed than ours. So, yes, for Europe, it’s a great road-trip mid-size SUV. For the US and Canada, it’s a compact CUV that is only good as a commuter car and around-town car similar to most other EVs of this size. Maybe the Model Y is an exception, but even that I’m not sure about, and I own one.
I think it is a bit more case dependant than that. I own a KIA Niro EV, and drove it from Phoenix Arizona to Milwaukee Wisconsin and back in the end of February/ early March. This is a roadtrip of 1800 miles each way that I have done at least a dozen times in an ice vehicle, and this was my first time in an EV. Driving with three adults and luggage it added about 6 hours each way more than a typical trip when you factor in bathroom, eating and sleeping breaks, which I found to not be too bad. The Niro EV also charges at about half the speed of the ID4, so If I had an ID4 at the time it would have been even less of a difference than an ICE vehicle.
 

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I think it is a bit more case dependant than that. I own a KIA Niro EV, and drove it from Phoenix Arizona to Milwaukee Wisconsin and back in the end of February/ early March. This is a roadtrip of 1800 miles each way that I have done at least a dozen times in an ice vehicle, and this was my first time in an EV. Driving with three adults and luggage it added about 6 hours each way more than a typical trip when you factor in bathroom, eating and sleeping breaks, which I found to not be too bad. The Niro EV also charges at about half the speed of the ID4, so If I had an ID4 at the time it would have been even less of a difference than an ICE vehicle.
Bottom line is it works if you drive along major interstates and you have a place to charge at your destination. It takes significantly longer, but it works.

My three road trips so far were either not along major interstates or I had no place to charge at my destination, or both. So, I had to take significant charging detours to be able to drive at my destination and to be able to get to the next charger on the way back. I also had to charge to 100% so that I wouldn’t have to call a tow truck, which also makes a charging session almost twice as long as it would charging to 80%.

At the end of the day I ask myself why the hell I got rid of my perfectly good ICE SUV, which was great on road trips. I don’t buy the environmental factor. My electricity is not green (I can’t choose green electricity), so my EVs are not green. Getting my own solar roof generation has an ROI of 35 years in my area, and until Russia, China, India, and Africa have a plan to transition to green energy and 100% EVs, what we do here in the US will have a minimal effect on climate change that may not even be measurable. I bought two EVs for convenience, but my road trips have become a huge inconvenience. Unless I buy a LUCID SUV (which doesn’t exist) ot a CyberTruck (which also doesn’t exist), I don’t have a viable road-trip vehicle for most of the US. I can, however drive to Canada if I follow the major interstates in the ID.4. And then I can travel around Canada as long as I map my route ahead of time and don’t deviate from it. Is this a sufficiently good road-trip vehicle solution? Not in my book. It’s almost like riding a train. You have to go where the rails are laid, and in the US, the rail system is pretty darn scarce, whereas in Europe you can get anywhere by rail. Can you travel by train in the US? Sure? Do a lot of people use rail travel in the US? Hell no. It’s slow, costs a fortune, and makes absolutely no sense.
 

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I disagree 100%. If you call the ID.4 too big a vehicle, we won’t be able to agree on much.
It's a good size for a road trip car (but I would still have bought the ID.3 if it was sold here) I just said it's too big and too heavy to be a good around town commuter car. Smaller, lighter, more nimble and easier to park are all traits of a great commuter car
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
It's a good size for a road trip car (but I would still have bought the ID.3 if it was sold here) I just said it's too big and too heavy to be a good around town commuter car. Smaller, lighter, more nimble and easier to park are all traits of a great commuter car
I would have much preferred an ID.3 vs the ID.4 but we are the minority in the states. I really think VW would have done ok sales with ID.3 here but I guess the tea leaves did not align correctly for that to happen.
 

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I'd love an id.3 as a second car. We've been looking at the Bolt as an alternative when the time comes to go back to 2 cars (have an up-and-coming driver). Though the seats in the Bolt still get middling results, which is disappointing.

I personally don't have any of the limitations that @truthseeker posted. We've so far seen no limitations for us in the way we use the car. Do we have to stop and charge a bit more often than gas and wait longer when we do? Yes. Does it matter to us? 230 miles of highway range in the AWD we have is 3 hours of saddle time. I used to be able to go 5 or more without a stop, but at 50 that's no longer in the cards. I do admit that the destination charging issue would be a bigger impact if we road tripped more possibly, but so far when we have we've just planned those stops into our adventure.

I guess it's what you make of it, and educate yourself on what to expect so you can make an informed choice. Charging does seem to be getting better, whether that's fast enough for current 'on the fence' buyers is a different story.
 

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As to being 25% less efficient, it is probably 25% heavier.
Try more than 30% heavier! (1,188 pounds heavier by a quick Google) Not to mention a much bigger frontal area so worse aerodynamics. It’s incredible this thing is as efficient as it is… I routinely get mid-3’s in mi/kWh.
 
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At this time, long road trip EV travel in the US and Canada means either Tesla (due to the Supercharger network) or Lucid (due to its long battery range). Every other EV on the market today is not a viable long road trip vehicle for people with jobs. For commuting, the ID.4 is brilliant.
Everyone's experience is different. I drive my ID4 RWD 500 miles every weekend across western Montana and haven't had a single issue. It takes an extra 55 mins, typically.
 

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Everyone's experience is different. I drive my ID4 RWD 500 miles every weekend across western Montana and haven't had a single issue. It takes an extra 55 mins, typically.
Because you have a place to charge at both ends. That’s why you are not having any issues. This is not how it works when you travel to a city that has no charging infrastructure and you are staying in a hotel with no destination chargers. As long as you travel along the highway that has DC chargers and both ends of your 500-mile commute have places to charge, of course there is no problem. This is not travel; this is commute.
 

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Because you have a place to charge at both ends. That’s why you are not having any issues. This is not how it works when you travel to a city that has no charging infrastructure and you are staying in a hotel with no destination chargers. As long as you travel along the highway that has DC chargers and both ends of your 500-mile commute have places to charge, of course there is no problem. This is not travel; this is commute.
Get a Tesla and get off this forum.
 

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I have the same EXACT car but 2022. You are not missing anything without the 3.1 software. None of those additional features work well enough to covet the 3.1 software.

I’ve compared the charging curves between the 2021 and the 2022 model years, and the 2021 charges about 10 kW faster above about 40% SOC. Yes, the 2022 can charge at 170+ kW but only under 25%. At 25% SOC, the charging speed goes to 150 kW, and by 30% SOC, the 2021 and the 2022 charge at the same speed. Anything above 45% SOC, and the 2021 charges more quickly. All in all, if you were to go from 10% to 80% SOC, I would guess the time you would spend to charge is about the same between the 2021 and the 2022. With the scarce DC charging infrastructure, I personally don’t feel comfortable riding the 10% to 60% SOC range. Instead, I ride 20+% to 100%, in which case it would take the same time to charge your car as mine or, your car would charge even faster.

I just came from a 550-mile trip from a northern Atlanta suburb to Huntsville, AL, and it was not a pretty picture with what I had to go through vis-à-vis charging. My wife is pissed (this is our third long road trip in the ID.4 in 7 weeks). We have two EVs now and no ICEV. She is demanding we trade in one of our EVs for an ICE SUV. Yes, it’s that bad. For around town, the ID.4 is a great vehicle. For road trips, not so much. The three deficiencies are: scarcity of the CCS charging infrastructure (not specific to the ID.4), short range of the ID.4, and slow charging speeds.

The two axioms with the EV travel that everyone pushes are completely wrong IMO when it comes to non-Tesla-EV long-distance travel:
1. Ride the lower half of the battery SOC. In theory, this makes sense. In todays’s reality, this doesn’t get you far off major interstates.
2. Never charge to 100%. After the first one and a half trips, I found that you should ALWAYS charge the ID.4 to 100% when leaving for a long road trip or while on a long road trip. The extra 25 minutes that you spend charging from 80% to 100% will save your bacon multiple times if you are venturing away from major highways.

My last two trips were to Orlando and to Huntsville. Orlando only had one DC charger with 6 stalls (this is Orlando, for crying out loud). We wasted 6 hours over the course of a three-day weekend just driving to the DC charger in Orlando, waiting in line, and getting a charge). We also put an extra 150 miles on the ID.4 while doing this. Huntsville has exactly ZERO DC chargers. The closest DC charger to Huntsville is 35 miles away in Athens, AL. That’s a 70-miles round-trip (in the wrong direction) and two hours of wasted time just to get a charge so that you can drive back to Atlanta.

Traveling in the ID.4 is akin intentionally complicating one’s life. With the current state of DC charging, the EV should have at a minimum 350 miles worth of real range. The range of 450 miles would make the EV travel feasible and similar to the ICEV travel. At 260 miles, the ID.4 is not a viable long road trip vehicle in the US or Canada. If you are retired and time is not an issue, the ID.4 can get you into most places in populated areas (but it may take twice as long as an ICEV). But, if you value time, the ID.4 is not a road trip vehicle you would want to use.

At this time, long road trip EV travel in the US and Canada means either Tesla (due to the Supercharger network) or Lucid (due to its long battery range). Every other EV on the market today is not a viable long road trip vehicle for people with jobs. For commuting, the ID.4 is brilliant.
I think there is nothing wrong with your I.D.4. The nations charging and infrastructure is extremely poor.
 

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It's true that if you travel in this area a lot, that there are not a lot of choices for DC fast charging (50kW or higher):

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I don't necessarrily find it true in looking at PlugShare that there aren't destination chargers at hotels available in the same area, but they may not be at a hotel you like or a preferred chain.

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Look and plan accordingly, and if you have to travel long distances in the middle of the country regularly or you frequent sparsely populated areas, then an EV might not be for you. You can also carry a 120/240 charger and stop at most campgrounds to see if they will let you charge using one of their RV hookups as well. None of it is optimal, but you can make it work if it's important to you.
 

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I think there is nothing wrong with your I.D.4. The nations charging and infrastructure is extremely poor.
That depends on which part of the nation you live in! Maybe moving would help :) I’ve done road trips from NJ to Boston and to DC and it’s been easy as pie! I’ve had my choice of Electrify America stations - they’re often 50 miles apart, and each have numerous stations and are widely used so plenty of reviews on PlugShare.
 
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