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ID.4 1st Edition White / Lunar Grey
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The first one offers the greatest flexibility since you can plug it in to any 120 volt receptacle if you're out and about. But it's limited to 12 amps at that voltage, which seems like a unnecessary compromise.

May I suggest this unit, which allows 16A at 120. Of course this needs to plugged it in to a 20A circuit to do that, but that's a typical rating for outdoor circuits .


I've been using the Duosida for coming up on two years on my other car and it's been a reliable performer, spending its life in my frunk and plugged in for 8+ hours daily.
 

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The first one offers the greatest flexibility since you can plug it in to any 120 volt receptacle if you're out and about. But it's limited to 12 amps at that voltage, which seems like a unnecessary compromise.

May I suggest this unit, which allows 16A at 120. Of course this needs to plugged it in to a 20A circuit to do that, but that's a typical rating for outdoor circuits .


I've been using the Duosida for coming up on two years on my other car and it's been a reliable performer, spending its life in my frunk and plugged in for 8+ hours daily.
Can the ID.4 charge at 16A on 120v? Most other EVs are limited to selection of 8A and 12A only.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition White / Lunar Grey
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899 Posts
Ooh, good question. The J1772 standard maxes out at 16A, but I only plugged the ID.4 the one time to clock it, and the numbers lined up. The problem with that methodology (basing charge on miles recouped instead of percent state of charge) is it varies by recent driver behavior. I'll have to make a point of plugging in for an extended duration and comparing the change in battery %, say over 8 hours.
 

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Happy owner of a blue ID.4 FE
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687 Posts
Since you’re asking about L2 units (240V), I will say all linked units are underpowered for my taste. I want to be able to arrive with 5% charge remaining in the evening, and charge to 100% overnight (that is, in 12 hours or less). That means a unit that can deliver 32A when connected to the right outlet. My Mustart Travelmaster can do this, but very few others.
 

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Glacier White ID.4 1st Edition
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For a portable backup L2 EVSE I have a 120v/240v EVSE with a normal 3 prong plug and a NEMA 14-50 adapter. Means I can plug at any normal outlet up to 16A and 14-50 outlets up to 32A, plus I carry a Tesla to J1772 adapter. Those destination chargers are normally free and deliver good power.
 

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397 Posts
If I were going to purchase a 220 volt charger that you want to take on the road, I would get one with an NEMA 14-50 plug because I think there are more of those around, such as a dryer outlet, which often is in a garage and easy to access.
 

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Glacier White ID.4 1st Edition
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I would get one with an NEMA 14-50 plug because I think there are more of those around, such as a dryer outlet, which often is in a garage and easy to access.
Dryers in the garage are a regional thing. In places with freezing winter temps you won't find them in the garage because of the freezing pipes. But a 14-50 comes in handy for RV parks and campgrounds and some people like my father have one in their garage to power their RV when they are home.
 

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2021 VW ID.4 FE
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94 Posts
If I were going to purchase a 220 volt charger that you want to take on the road, I would get one with an NEMA 14-50 plug because I think there are more of those around, such as a dryer outlet, which often is in a garage and easy to access.
My experience is that the vast majority of dryer outlets are on 30amp circuits, using either 14-30 or 10-30 sockets.
 

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Premium Member
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When we moved to California 14 years ago from the Midwest, I always hated the dryer in the garage. Now I see an advantage with the plug being accessible for a EV.

My 56 year old house only has a 100 amp supply. So I’m looking at a SplitVolt. However, I’m also reroofing it in the next month and adding solar so I might upgrade the supply to 200 amp, put in a EV plug and just wrap all the cost into the home improvement.
 

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2021 VW ID.4 FE
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94 Posts
When we moved to California 14 years ago from the Midwest, I always hated the dryer in the garage. Now I see an advantage with the plug being accessible for a EV.

My 56 year old house only has a 100 amp supply. So I’m looking at a SplitVolt. However, I’m also reroofing it in the next month and adding solar so I might upgrade the supply to 200 amp, put in a EV plug and just wrap all the cost into the home improvement.
I considered a SplitVolt but instead opted to install this toggle switch above my dryer. Ran a branch on the same circuit to the garage, which shares a common wall with the laundry room. Switch, new socket in garage and misc supplies cost under $100. Never use dryer at night anyway, and typically only need to charge EV once a week.
 
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