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The only way I can make the id4 work for my family is to use a rooftop cargo box (our dog will be occupying the trunk). Anyone care to hazard a guess what kind of range reduction I'm looking at with a rooftop cargo box?
I'm concerned that reported range ~ 230 == real world range of 200 == real world range of 150 with a rooftop box.
 

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The only way I can make the id4 work for my family is to use a rooftop cargo box (our dog will be occupying the trunk). Anyone care to hazard a guess what kind of range reduction I'm looking at with a rooftop cargo box?
I'm concerned that reported range ~ 230 == real world range of 200 == real world range of 150 with a rooftop box.
Hard to know for an ID.4 at this point, but similar impact study on a Tesla Model 3 was a 12% hit. Model 3 Roof Rack Consumption Test

You quoted standard ~230 mile range for the ID.4. Are you talking the AWD model?
 

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Yep, AWD. I live in MN so I’m leaning toward AWD. It’s also why I shave off miles for the “real world range” - temps are less than ideal for battery efficiency.
Thanks for that link! 12% isn’t as bad as I would have thought.
 

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Yep, AWD. I live in MN so I’m leaning toward AWD. It’s also why I shave off miles for the “real world range” - temps are less than ideal for battery efficiency.
Thanks for that link! 12% isn’t as bad as I would have thought.
Another Minnesotan! Welcome. I signed up for my test drive at Ridgedale; sad that it’s not until the end of May.
Range reduction is a definite concern and one reason I’ve still been considering the Ariya with its purported 300 mile range.
One option for you might be one of those cargo racks that fit into the hitch receiver - keeps it out of the wind.
 

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One option for you might be one of those cargo racks that fit into the hitch receiver - keeps it out of the wind.
Do you know of any range tests for those rear hitch cargo racks? I was thinking as well that the reduction in range might be a bit better compared to roof top options (also easier accessible).
 

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Do you know of any range tests for those rear hitch cargo racks? I was thinking as well that the reduction in range might be a bit better compared to roof top options (also easier accessible).
I don't have any data for the impact of roof racks vs. rear hitch cargo options on EV range. But gas mileage on an ICE vehicle should offer some guidance. In the case of our road-tripping vehicle (shape not dissimilar to the ID.4), any roof rack cargo has a significant impact on consumption (up by a good 20% at highway speeds, more if going faster). Meanwhile, the hitch cargo solution has had barely any discernible impact on fuel economy. I'd peg it in the <5% range, which is why I'm reluctant to even attribute it to the cargo tray, as opposed to headwinds, etc.

To be sure, the viability of a hitch tray depends on your cargo. Skis may be harder to transport that way. But for luggage, etc., these are great options. When in a pinch, we just pile two of Costco's gigantic storage boxes onto the tray. They fit perfectly next to one another, and you could add more on top. Just make sure you don't cover your taillights. On the ID.4, they are high enough up to support quite some storage. Since it's not the teardrop shape of, say, the Model Y, the aerodynamics should also be impacted less.

One minor caveat is that, if memory serves, most cargo trays are meant for a 2-inch receiver, so the ID.4's 1.25-inch receiver would require some adapter. Here's the tray we're using. Another nice feature is the ability to fold it away when not in use, presumably helping aerodynamics and reducing the vehicle footprint for parking, etc. Hope this helps.
 

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I don't have any data for the impact of roof racks vs. rear hitch cargo options on EV range. But gas mileage on an ICE vehicle should offer some guidance. In the case of our road-tripping vehicle (shape not dissimilar to the ID.4), any roof rack cargo has a significant impact on consumption (up by a good 20% at highway speeds, more if going faster). Meanwhile, the hitch cargo solution has had barely any discernible impact on fuel economy. I'd peg it in the <5% range, which is why I'm reluctant to even attribute it to the cargo tray, as opposed to headwinds, etc.

To be sure, the viability of a hitch tray depends on your cargo. Skis may be harder to transport that way. But for luggage, etc., these are great options. When in a pinch, we just pile two of Costco's gigantic storage boxes onto the tray. They fit perfectly next to one another, and you could add more on top. Just make sure you don't cover your taillights. On the ID.4, they are high enough up to support quite some storage. Since it's not the teardrop shape of, say, the Model Y, the aerodynamics should also be impacted less.

One minor caveat is that, if memory serves, most cargo trays are meant for a 2-inch receiver, so the ID.4's 1.25-inch receiver would require some adapter. Here's the tray we're using. Another nice feature is the ability to fold it away when not in use, presumably helping aerodynamics and reducing the vehicle footprint for parking, etc. Hope this helps.
That is awesome. Thanks for your inside. That will be the option for us. We are camping quite a bit and this will help very much. I think, we just have to watch the vertical weight rating.
 

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And presumably you can still open the trunk if you have a modestly loaded hitch tray?
I cannot speak for the ID.4 (yet) but, based on experience with a comparable SUV, the answer is yes. There's enough space to open the trunk even with a well-stacked carrier. In fact, our carrier leaves enough of a gap even for our 50-pound dog to get in and out of the trunk.
 

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Yep, AWD. I live in MN so I’m leaning toward AWD. It’s also why I shave off miles for the “real world range” - temps are less than ideal for battery efficiency.
Thanks for that link! 12% isn’t as bad as I would have thought.
Note that was tested at 100km/h = 62mph. At our highway speeds of 75mph the loss will be higher than 15% since it goes up exponentially with speed. These tests on many gas cars said it was 19%:
How Adventure Gear Strapped to Your Roof Affects Gas Mileage
 

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The only way I can make the id4 work for my family is to use a rooftop cargo box (our dog will be occupying the trunk). Anyone care to hazard a guess what kind of range reduction I'm looking at with a rooftop cargo box?
I'm concerned that reported range ~ 230 == real world range of 200 == real world range of 150 with a rooftop box.
Get a smaller dog. Just kidding.
 

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Hi, real world, 70Mph and the AC on full (I live in hot part of California, and range is 200, with the biggest roof box Yakima sell.
Most likely I will be flying from Texas to Florida to pick up a demo First Edition. They are throwing in rack and a cargo box to cover the 900 moles on the vehicle. Id rather have cash off, but otherwise believe it is a fair trade in the current market. Now my question is have you done any more trips with the rack and cargo box to get a more complete look at mileage? I’m mixed on just telling them to keep it since not only would my first electric road trip be in a ‘new’ car, but also with a giant brick on top.
 

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Naw, you can fold the backseat down and put rack and box inside the car. Assuming you don’t have more than 2 people in the car of course.
With the box on top, mount it the “wrong” way. Tesla drivers report better range that way, and aerodynamics considerations bear that out. It’s easier to push a blunt front through the air if the air can slip off the back of the object cleanly.
 

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Naw, you can fold the backseat down and put rack and box inside the car. Assuming you don’t have more than 2 people in the car of course.
With the box on top, mount it the “wrong” way. Tesla drivers report better range that way, and aerodynamics considerations bear that out. It’s easier to push a blunt front through the air if the air can slip off the back of the object cleanly.
I have thought of that, but can’t find interior dimensions, just volume numbers. The carrier is 75 inches long and in the picture makes it look like it takes up the whole roof area. The box might be located a bit forward on the roof.
 

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