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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know what the mile range/life of the tire on the Hankook tires on the Pro would be with average driving but not pushing to the max on every drive? I am also wondering when is the best time to rotate if it should be at 5,000 miles instead of 10,000.
 

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Does anyone know what the mile range/life of the tire on the Hankook tires on the Pro would be with average driving but not pushing to the max on every drive? I am also wondering when is the best time to rotate if it should be at 5,000 miles instead of 10,000.
Keep in mind the rear tires are wider than the front tires, so any rotation would just be a matter of swapping sides. Does anyone know if these tires are directional?
 

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Both the 19s and 20s have wider rears than the fronts, so they can only be swapped side to side. They are not directional tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Keep in mind the rear tires are wider than the front tires, so any rotation would just be a matter of swapping sides. Does anyone know if these tires are directional?
OK I believe I have the 19's/ any idea on the mile range on these?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That really depends on the driver more than anything else.
That's true for any tire, right? What I am trying to find out is if there is a suggested range due to it being an EV tire and the extra weight of the car.
 

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The ev tire is developed for extra low rolling resistance, so I’d guess that would offset the weight a bit. Temperature, road conditions, how hard you floor it, or stamp on the brakes are mostly likely the biggest drivers for tire life
 

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From the Discount Tire website:

Treadware

The rating for treadwear is a relative score given to a tire as an estimate of longevity. It is not a projected estimate of the mileage or tread life. Scores are determined by tire wear in closely controlled driving conditions. The rating for treadwear is given numerically, and is made in comparison to a reference tire given a 100. A tire that scores a 400 in treadwear should last twice as long as a tire with a 200. A comparable tire, made by a different manufacturer, may be given a score of 300.To reiterate; the scores for a comparable tire may vary from brand to brand. It is important, then, to only compare tire scores within a given brand. Actual treadwear may vary based on real-world use. Driving habits, proper air pressure, road conditions, and even climate can affect tread life.
 

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ID.4 1st Edition Blue (acquired 4/20/2021)
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That really depends on the driver more than anything else.
I didn’t think so either… but now I can “quote” someone else other than myself when “pressured” to do so. 🤣 Although I am getting too old for the pressure game anyway. Just say no (reused from my former career).
 

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I'm guessing you can figure about 25% less than you would get from an ICE car on similar tires, mostly due to the weight.

I've typically gotten 40,000 miles or more from new tires. Given the weight of this car I'm guessing I'll be lucky to get 30,000 miles. Sadly, I seem to enjoy the acceleration in this car more - so the rears might only last 20-25,000 miles. I hope I'm wrong...but I doubt it.

Your best reference for a guess would be Tesla owners, particularly the Models 3 and Y which are more analogous to the ID.4. Go see what they're saying.
 

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I changed the tires on my RAV4 Hybrid last year at 70k. That car is only about 400 lbs lighter than the FE. Driver is the biggest factor followed by road conditions. I check my pressures weekly and rotate every 5k.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I'm guessing you can figure about 25% less than you would get from an ICE car on similar tires, mostly due to the weight.

I've typically gotten 40,000 miles or more from new tires. Given the weight of this car I'm guessing I'll be lucky to get 30,000 miles. Sadly, I seem to enjoy the acceleration in this car more - so the rears might only last 20-25,000 miles. I hope I'm wrong...but I doubt it.

Your best reference for a guess would be Tesla owners, particularly the Models 3 and Y which are more analogous to the ID.4. Go see what they're saying.
Yes talking to a Tesla owner of a model 3 and why might be a good way to gauge the mileage on those tires. I do agree that there will be a range based on the type of driver but due to the higher trend level as well I think we can get more mileage if we drive right. Thanks for the input.
 

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On the Model 3, the reported tire life is short, possibly due to the 45psi recommended pressure and low profile. Not having received my ID.4 yet, what is the recommended operating pressure for the 19” and 20” tires?
 

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As some members have lamented the OEM tires have a relatively shallow tread depth, so these tires may wear out relatively quickly. But driver style, typical traffic pattern, city/highway, etc. make all but a general average near impossible to determine. The tire companies (TireRack, etc.) will likely provide a number at some point.
I just looked and as expected not yet enough data.
btw: shallow tread depth = less tire weight and less rolling resistance and thereby help in achieving the advertised range. There's always a reason for a design. Whether someone will like it or not is of course subjective. ;)
 

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On the Model 3, the reported tire life is short, possibly due to the 45psi recommended pressure and low profile. Not having received my ID.4 yet, what is the recommended operating pressure for the 19” and 20” tires?
I got 16,000 miles out of the rear tires on my Model 3. It's due to the tendency to drive quicker, and also that EV (low rolling resistance tires) tend to come with less tread from the factory when new. They start out at 8.5/32" on the Model 3, whereas most tires come with 10-11/32". The pressure and tire profile don't really affect treadwear - unless the pressure is under or overinflated and it's wearing weird.
 

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These heavy EVs will eat tires. The added wear comes from acceleration, braking and cornering of a heavy vehicle. To make matters worse, to avoid having the car feel "squirmy" when the tires are new, tires with less tread are often specified. My Porsche 911 tires ( Michelin PS2 N2 ) have less tread on the rears when new to ensure good handling with all that weight in the back. In addition, wider tires will often wear faster as there is more likely to have uneven wear. The 911 is not at all a heavy car but to optimize handling, the wide rear tires come with less tread. They are also UHP summer tires as well which=short life. All season tires with a deeper tread can have problems with a heavy car so it would not surprise me that VW might choose a tire with less tread for that model.
 
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