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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was able to snap a picture of the included Level 1 120 volt EV Cord Set at the dealership today.

1791


I found https://www.aptiv.com/docs/default-source/user-manual/english-user-manual-ic-cpd.pdf, which appears to be the manual for this device. Although the US English specific labeling on the back says 60 Hz and 120 volts, the user manual says 50 or 60 Hz, and 100-240 volts, with a "depending on the model" caveat.

Once I get my ID.4, I'll take a closer look at this to see if it can be used as a 240 volt EVSE with an adapter. I think there is a good chance the components are the same worldwide and it is universal voltage.
 

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ID.4 Pro S AWD / Waiting, waiting, waiting
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I don't think you can convert to 240V. The manual states "The IC-CPD charging equipment provides a standard grounded power connection to residential building sockets from 100 V to 240 V 50/60 Hz (depending on the model variant) and a charging current of 6 A up to 16 A according to the specifications on the back label of the control box of your device."

There are obviously different variants by country and the label has 120V @ 10A. Also, the only NEMA connector shown in the manual is the 5-15. It's sad the EVSE is even rated to 10A. At 1.2kW, the car only charges 2 miles/hr. It should at least be 12A. They should be able to have an adapters for 240V (or even NEMA 5-20) but doesn't seem likely.

You are likely better off just buying an aftermarket mobile EVSE than trying to convert the included one to 240V.

EDIT: Also, looking at the picture, I see 3×14AWG and 18AWG wirings (can't tell if they are different cables). That wiring can't support more than 15A or 10A.
 
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Just part of that 46% Chinese content...
 
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It's sad the EVSE is even rated to 10A. At 1.2kW, the car only charges 2 miles/hr. It should at least be 12A.
That is sad! I was hoping it could do NEMA 5-20. Not even full capacity of NEMA 5-15 is truly terrible.
 

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That is sad! I was hoping it could do NEMA 5-20. Not even full capacity of NEMA 5-15 is truly terrible.
Hardly anybody has a 5-20 receptacle. Just from the standpoint of what the average U.S. home has in the garage, that's probably a decent fit.

I can't see anyone putting in a 5-20 either. If you are going to pay an electrician, you would put in a 14-50.
 

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That looks pretty shitty. I hoped they'd ship a 110/220v L1/L2 charger with replaceable plugs, just like Tesla bundles with their cars. It's not the end of the world since you can buy one for just $250 on Amazon, but it sure would have been nice to get one with the car.

The yellow cable looks horrible btw.
 

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That looks pretty shitty. I hoped they'd ship a 110/220v L1/L2 charger with replaceable plugs, just like Tesla bundles with their cars. It's not the end of the world since you can buy one for just $250 on Amazon, but it sure would have been nice to get one with the car.

The yellow cable looks horrible btw.
Also the Mustang Mach-e ships with a L1/L2 charger
 

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ID.4 Pro S Gradient AWD pre-ordered 9/23/2020
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That is sad! I was hoping it could do NEMA 5-20. Not even full capacity of NEMA 5-15 is truly terrible.
BMW did something similar with its OCU cables. The original ones were 12A and the later ones were 10A. If I’m not mistaken, it’s because using the OCU’s for long charging sessions builds up a lot of heat in electrical circuits that weren’t designed for extended periods of time at max load. Lots of stories of melted plugs and outlets.
 

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BMW did something similar with its OCU cables. The original ones were 12A and the later ones were 10A. If I’m not mistaken, it’s because using the OCU’s for long charging sessions builds up a lot of heat in electrical circuits that weren’t designed for extended periods of time at max load. Lots of stories of melted plugs and outlets.
The workaround is to design it for max load charging - not just rename it "Occasional Use Cable."
 

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The workaround is to design it for max load charging - not just rename it "Occasional Use Cable."
The problem wasn’t the OCU, it was the electrical circuit side. The OCU is fine. My i3 had the older higher amp version and it never had issues. Did melt an outlet at my mom’s house once with it, though. Oops.
 

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18awg wire seems a bit small for carrying 10amps for extended periods. Most of the amp calculators I can find call for 14awg to pull 10 amps.
 

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This makes me want to keep the portable EVSE that came with my Toyota RAV4EV that I had converted to 120/240V operation and had a L6-30 socket attached. I keep several pigtails for different outlets. It's only 12A but it's better than nothing.
 

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18awg wire seems a bit small for carrying 10amps for extended periods. Most of the amp calculators I can find call for 14awg to pull 10 amps.
I am thinking the cable has both wires inside. J1772 has 5 pins - two power, a ground, a control pilot and proximity detection. I am guessing the control pilot and proximity detection are low voltage and use the 18awg wire.
 

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So to open the discussion a bit; what is a great dual voltage portable EVSE to replace the L1 device that comes with the vehicle?
 

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I think you meant 6-50 as 14-50 is a somewhat antiquated carryover from older home wiring. Much discussion elsewhere.
Font Material property Publication Technology Gas
... If you are going to pay an electrician, you would put in a 14-50.
ChristophW has a great plan tho' for carrying a hybrid 14-50 cable to hook up to say a garage 220V dryer socket when traveling (garage-common in warmer climates, but not in colder as accompanying washer water Winter freeze concerns).
 

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I think you meant 6-50 as 14-50 is a somewhat antiquated carryover from older home wiring. Much discussion elsewhere.
View attachment 1803


ChristophW has a great plan tho' for carrying a hybrid 14-50 cable to hook up to say a garage 220V dryer socket when traveling (garage-common in warmer climates, but not in colder as accompanying washer water Winter freeze concerns).
No, I meant 14-50 - that's what my JuiceBox Pro came with. I wasn't aware that 6-50 is now preferred. I had seen that the new electrcical code seems to prefer hardwired EVSE.

Dryers tend to be only 30A, so would take a different plug altogether. I suppose if a dryer plug is what you have, you could purchase a portable EVSE that is rated for such a circuit.
 

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Does anyone know of a good portable EVSE that has multiple different NEMA plug adapters? I have family that live in different areas of the country and I’m sure their plugs are not all the same.
 

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Does anyone know of a good portable EVSE that has multiple different NEMA plug adapters? I have family that live in different areas of the country and I’m sure their plugs are not all the same.
Some of the companies that offer L2 EVSE’s make portable versions. Technically, any plug-in version is portable. However, the cables are long and often very thick, and not very portable at all in my opinion, not to mention the bulk of the L2 EVSE in general. I’ve heard of this one, but have no experience with it nor have I read any first-person accounts of using it. It has lots of plug adapters available. I don’t think it can switch between 120v/240v, however.

 

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Does anyone know of a good portable EVSE that has multiple different NEMA plug adapters? I have family that live in different areas of the country and I’m sure their plugs are not all the same.
Check out this 16A one from Quick Charge Power. I haven't used this one but I have been happy with their other products (JdeMO) and the company has great customer service:
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Wow, this thread took off! Wanted to clarify some of my original musings, as well as reply to some of the things brought up in this thread.

I don't think you can convert to 240V. [...] There are obviously different variants by country and the label has 120V @ 10A.

You are likely better off just buying an aftermarket mobile EVSE than trying to convert the included one to 240V.
I'll try to clarify more what I meant. As I understand it, UL certification is quite expensive. Thus, it rarely makes sense to certify one set of electronics in North America, and one set in Europe, and yet another set somewhere else in the world. Take a look at a laptop or phone charger- you'll note that nearly all of them made in the last 5 years or so support 100-240 volts and 50-60 Hz. Given that this exact same base model is used worldwide, I am guessing (but could be wrong!) that the only difference between European models and North American models is the two cordsets- one that plugs into the wall, and one that plugs into the car.

Maybe I'll register later today so I can look at the full details of UL certification for this EVSE. Search for E483194 on Product iQ | UL

The yellow cable looks horrible btw.
For something I only intend to use occasionally, I think the yellow cord might be a blessing. Makes it much less of a tripping hazard when it is being used to plug in somewhere that isn't my own garage. I have a dedicated EVSE at home, but for something I might plug in on a road trip, or at a camp site, or wherever, a bright yellow "please don't trip on me" cord is better than a black one, IMO.

EDIT: Also, looking at the picture, I see 3×14AWG and 18AWG wirings (can't tell if they are different cables). That wiring can't support more than 15A or 10A.
18awg wire seems a bit small for carrying 10amps for extended periods. Most of the amp calculators I can find call for 14awg to pull 10 amps.
Someone else mentioned it, but the full labeling on the cord is 3x14 AWG + 1x18 AWG. The 18 AWG wire is the control pilot, and the 14 AWG wires are ground + 2 current conductors (hot/hot for North American 240 volts, or hot/neutral for 120 volts).

Keep in mind that the NEC (electrical code) does NOT apply to appliance wiring or anything you plug into the wall. The jurisdiction stops once you get to a receptacle. Let's take a ETL-listed ClipperCreek charger, for example- the manual (page 18) shows that they use 10 AWG wiring for 40 amps, and 8 AWG wiring for 50 and 60 amps. This is more than what the NEC would allow at 75ºC. 14 AWG should have no problem up to 15 or 16 amps.

I think you meant 6-50 as 14-50 is a somewhat antiquated carryover from older home wiring. Much discussion elsewhere.
14-50 is definitely not antiquated. I'd say it is the most future proof outlet, as it has 2 hot wires, 1 neutral, and 1 ground. A 14-50 can be used as a 6-50, since a 6-50 is 2 hot + 1 ground. NEMA 10 is the no-longer-used standard (typically found on older clothes dryer outlets), which does not have a ground, but only 2 hots and 1 neutral.

If you have a 14-50 or 6-50 in your garage, or any other NEMA 6 outlet (6-15, 6-20), you should have no problem finding a charger that can plug into it.


My reason for wanting to investigate if this can be a dual-voltage charger stems from the following:
  • Not wanting to have to buy another occasional or rarely used charger
  • This charger is UL-listed, whereas the $200 ones on Amazon most definitely are not
  • The Amazing-E looks like a great road trip charger, but it doesn't support 120 volts from what I can see, which means I'd need to bring two chargers, not one, for maximum compatibility
  • Being able to use the occasional use charger on a 240 volt outlet, even at 10 amps, will charge at least twice as fast compared to 120 volts. Level 2 charging is more efficient, likely because there are more losses going from 120 VAC -> 400 VDC as compared to 240 VAC -> 400 VDC.

I don't want to guess too much more until I actually get the car and the included charger, but I wouldn't be surprised to open it up and see some DIP switches that allow changing the fixed charging current value, and possibly the voltage if it isn't universal.

If indeed it is dual voltage, it's just a trip to the hardware store to pick up the parts build a few custom adapters (NEMA 10-30 for old dryer outlets, NEMA 14-30 for new ones, etc).
 
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