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Hello, I own a ID.4 Pro S, and so far I been driving locally with about 75/25 highway/city and I have noticed that if driving in the city the "B" mode gets me the best mileage range.
I have tried both "D" and "B" mode driving on the highway and I can't tell much of a difference. I am getting ready to take my first trip trip from KC, MO to ST. Louis, MO; which is like about 276 miles. Just a little bit over the 250 mileage range of the ID.4, so I know that I will need to make one stop there and back, and I already mapped out.

In hoping to get the best mileage so wondering what anyone else has experienced.

Thanks
 

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I like that you're actually performing comparison tests vs. relying on conventional wisdom espoused here.

I think the two modes should provide very similar results in the ID.4 because of the way brake pedal activation engages regeneration. But this assumes steady throttle control on the freeway or anytime else the car is steady cruising.

I haven't performed any consumption tests, but definitely feel the effects of B mode. I like D if it's wide open freeway with no braking, but then I'm likely to engage cruise, and B most other times for the very limited one-pedal driving effects the ID 4 offers.

But those are my preferences, not based on max efficiency.
 

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Hello, I own a ID.4 Pro S, and so far I been driving locally with about 75/25 highway/city and I have noticed that if driving in the city the "B" mode gets me the best mileage range.
I have tried both "D" and "B" mode driving on the highway and I can't tell much of a difference. I am getting ready to take my first trip trip from KC, MO to ST. Louis, MO; which is like about 276 miles. Just a little bit over the 250 mileage range of the ID.4, so I know that I will need to make one stop there and back, and I already mapped out.

In hoping to get the best mileage so wondering what anyone else has experienced.

Thanks
As Nai3t pointed out driving at a steady speed results is similar mileage regardless of driving mode. There are a couple of strategies you can employ on long trips.

Moderating speed has the biggest impact on vehicle range on the highway, once you are confident you will make it to your next stop there is no need to moderate speed at all.
Charge just enough plus a small buffer to make it to the next stop or the next destination, no need to fill 'er up. For charging strategy watch Kyle Conner of Out of Spec Motoring on a long road trip.
 

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There are as many suggestion about the D & B mode as there are folks driving the ID4. I personally drive in the B mode and in sport mode. With most of my charging at EA I am not to concerned with squeezing out every drop of energy - I just like the B mode. Will be looking forward to a software update that will let the ID4 come to a complete stop in B mode. You should drive with what makes you feel comfortable.
 

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2021 VW iD4 1st Edition Glacier White
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I think you will get the best highway range by driving in D and not using cruise control, just modulating the speed with your foot and avoid braking as much as possible. The reason is that any regen is not 100% efficient, so if you avoid regen and avoid braking you will get the best efficiency. Obviously this is only possible if there is no traffic.
 

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I think you will get the best highway range by driving in D and not using cruise control, just modulating the speed with your foot and avoid braking as much as possible. The reason is that any regen is not 100% efficient, so if you avoid regen and avoid braking you will get the best efficiency. Obviously this is only possible if there is no traffic.
This is the same experience I had. Switching between B and D based on traffic provides the most efficiency. Since I am used to the manual, I don't mind switching between B and D on the fly(lights, ramps, traffic). Travel assist is the least efficient and most comfortable. D is light on the foot. B requires a bit more pressure on the pedal to maintain the same speed. Travel assist lets you take the foot off the pedal and maintain the same speed.
 

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I think you will get the best highway range by driving in D and not using cruise control, just modulating the speed with your foot and avoid braking as much as possible. The reason is that any regen is not 100% efficient, so if you avoid regen and avoid braking you will get the best efficiency. Obviously this is only possible if there is no traffic.
I disagree. Cruise control can much better modulate your speed than you can with your foot. In my ICE vehicles I did a highway distance test and proved that using the cruise was more fuel efficient than your foot.
 

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I think you will get the best highway range by driving in D and not using cruise control, just modulating the speed with your foot and avoid braking as much as possible. The reason is that any regen is not 100% efficient, so if you avoid regen and avoid braking you will get the best efficiency. Obviously this is only possible if there is no traffic.
You are correct.
Driving in D mode and driving "like your brakes don't work" will yield the best range whether a BEV or and ICE car. Of course one must use the brakes but driving such that brakes are used less will yield better range. In addition avoiding the use of cruise control will also yield better range. Cruise control cannot predict the future. You can. As an example, if approaching the crest of hill, cruise control will continue applying power when you know you can let up on the power earlier. Also, you can coast when seeing traffic is beginning to slow ahead. Cruise control cannot do that and ACC will do this later and then hit the brakes. As you state there are efficiency losses in charging and discharging batteries as well as running motors and generators ( re-gen mode). All of this creates heat ( losses).

The only case where CC can be more efficient is if the driver is incapable of operating the car smoothly while cruising.
 

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You are correct.
Driving in D mode and driving "like your brakes don't work" will yield the best range whether a BEV or and ICE car. Of course one must use the brakes but driving such that brakes are used less will yield better range. In addition avoiding the use of cruise control will also yield better range. Cruise control cannot predict the future. You can. As an example, if approaching the crest of hill, cruise control will continue applying power when you know you can let up on the power earlier. Also, you can coast when seeing traffic is beginning to slow ahead. Cruise control cannot do that and ACC will do this later and then hit the brakes. As you state there are efficiency losses in charging and discharging batteries as well as running motors and generators ( re-gen mode). All of this creates heat ( losses).

The only case where CC can be more efficient is if the driver is incapable of operating the car smoothly while cruising.
BS!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
As Nai3t pointed out driving at a steady speed results is similar mileage regardless of driving mode. There are a couple of strategies you can employ on long trips.

Moderating speed has the biggest impact on vehicle range on the highway, once you are confident you will make it to your next stop there is no need to moderate speed at all.
Charge just enough plus a small buffer to make it to the next stop or the next destination, no need to fill 'er up. For charging strategy watch Kyle Conner of Out of Spec Motoring on a long road trip.
Thanks for the Video very good information.

I agree on the moderating speed having the biggest impact as I have a bit of a lead foot at times and I have noticed that it really effect the range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think you will get the best highway range by driving in D and not using cruise control, just modulating the speed with your foot and avoid braking as much as possible. The reason is that any regen is not 100% efficient, so if you avoid regen and avoid braking you will get the best efficiency. Obviously this is only possible if there is no traffic.
Thanks for that piece of information. With this I think that I will drive in D mode there and back on the highway and use cruise control on the way there and not use it on the way back and see if there is much noticeable difference.
 

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Thanks for that piece of information. With this I think that I will drive in D mode there and back on the highway and use cruise control on the way there and not use it on the way back and see if there is much noticeable difference.
Not sure how you will quantify impact of weather (especially wind) and elevation change.
 

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I suggest you read the study on this topic published by the IEEE. In a real-world experiment involving 18,500 trips, researchers found 5-7% energy savings for drivers using adaptive cruise control. An Automated Vehicle Fuel Economy Benefits Evaluation Framework Using Real-World Travel and Traffic Data
I don't believe this study is representative of the scenario that we are discussing here. I am not sure what they are comparing but looks like they talk about a vehicle with ACC vs vehicles w/o ACC in a mix driving condition. My personal experience is that on open road the ACC will reduce efficiency a little bit. Mathematically this can be explained by ACC overshooting speed and trying to reduce it, but it could also be that you drive a bit slower overall when you regulate the speed yourself. A 1 mph difference in average speed at highway can have a significant impact on efficiency.

P.S. the electronics could also use more electricity when you are on ACC. Something like 300w for example will translate to 1 kw in a 3.5 hour drive which translates to 3.5 miles of range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Not sure how you will quantify impact of weather (especially wind) and elevation change.
That is true and I think that even if one had the time to make the trip twice so you could alternate the cruise control with it on the first trip and off the second trip you would never have the same impact of weather and would never have a perfect test. So lacking time to take this trip twice this is the best I can do, and I hoping that it might provide some useful information.
 

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I could care less about squeezing every mile I can unless I really need to.
I do care about safety. I find driving in B mode in town and highway driving allows for that split second braking the car does on release of the accelerator to give me the feel of a safe drive.
 

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I don't believe this study is representative of the scenario that we are discussing here. I am not sure what they are comparing but looks like they talk about a vehicle with ACC vs vehicles w/o ACC in a mix driving condition. My personal experience is that on open road the ACC will reduce efficiency a little bit. Mathematically this can be explained by ACC overshooting speed and trying to reduce it, but it could also be that you drive a bit slower overall when you regulate the speed yourself. A 1 mph difference in average speed at highway can have a significant impact on efficiency.

P.S. the electronics could also use more electricity when you are on ACC. Something like 300w for example will translate to 1 kw in a 3.5 hour drive which translates to 3.5 miles of range.
Plus that assumes "the average of drivers" and I think it's safe to say we aren't "average drivers"
 
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